Big 12 coaching carousel recap

March, 2, 2015
Mar 2
4:00
PM ET
The coaching carousel has finally slowed to a stop (well, almost), so let’s take a look back at who has gone and who is new in the Big 12 heading into spring practice. Iowa State and Kansas State made no changes, but every other program in the conference is breaking in at least two new assistants this fall. A rundown of all the changes:

Baylor

Out: Philip Montgomery (Tulsa), Brian Norwood (Tulsa)
In: Promoted Kendal Briles (OC) and Tate Wallis (WRs), hired Cris Dishman (DBs)

Art Briles is handing the reins of Baylor's offense to his son, Kendal Briles, who had previously coached the Bears’ prolific receivers. He earned the promotion after Montgomery landed the head coaching job at Tulsa and brought Norwood along as his co-defensive coordinator. The younger Briles will now oversee quarterbacks and provide his own innovative touches to playcalling. Dishman, a former Pro Bowler, will also bring fresh ideas to the mix as the safeties coach.

Kansas

In: Hired David Beaty (HC), Rob Likens (OC), Reggie Mitchell (RBs), Klint Kubiak (WRs), Zach Yenser (OL), Gary Hyman (ST/TEs), Kenny Perry (co-DC), Calvin Thibodeaux (DL), Kevin Kane (LBs)

Beaty has been well-received by Kansas fans so far and assembled a staff that will compete on the recruiting trail. Retaining Clint Bowen as co-DC and assistant head coach was his first move and certainly a popular one. Likens and Yenser come from Cal and will help install Beaty’s Air Raid-style vision for the offense. Perry, a high school coach just three years ago, was plucked from TCU’s staff. Bringing back strength coach Je'Ney Jackson, a former Mark Mangino assistant, was another savvy move.

Oklahoma

Out: Josh Heupel (Utah State), Jay Norvell (Texas), Jerry Montgomery (Green Bay Packers), Bobby Jack Wright (retired)
In: Hired Lincoln Riley (OC), Dennis Simmons (WRs), Diron Reynolds (DL), Kerry Cooks (DBs)

Bob Stoops hated having to part ways with Heupel and Norvell, but a change of direction for the offense was necessary. Riley, a Mike Leach disciple who got the Air Raid rolling at East Carolina, seems like a great fit and the perfect guy to deliver on Stoops’ new plan. Simmons, another former Leach assistant, should help with the transition. Cooks was Notre Dame’s ace recruiter in Texas, and Reynolds has more than a decade of NFL coaching experience.

Oklahoma State

Out: Bob Connelly (USC), Jemal Singleton (Arkansas), Van Malone (SMU), Eric Wolford (San Francisco 49ers), Jason Ray
In: Hired Dan Hammerschmidt, Marcus Arroyo, Greg Adkins, Jason McEndoo

Gundy completed his staff last week after enduring a lot of change, including one coach (Wolford) taking an NFL job a week after being hired. The specific roles for OSU’s four new hires have yet to be announced. Hammerschmidt is taking a job on the defense, and the other three will work with the offense. Arroyo was the Tampa Bay Bucs’ interim offensive coordinator last season. Adkins also comes from the pros. McEndoo was a longtime assistant at FCS Montana State.

TCU

Out: Dick Bumpas (retired), Kenny Perry (Kansas)
In: Promoted DeMontie Cross (co-DC), Chad Glasgow (co-DC), Paul Gonzales (CBs), Dan Sharp (DL)

Gary Patterson stuck to promoting from within this offseason, rewarding Cross and Glasgow when Bumpas stepped aside after 11 years as a Frog. Gonzales was promoted after three years as a grad assistant. Sharp, a member of the staff since 2001, was a director of player personnel last season, but has long overseen TCU’s special teams. Patterson says every member of his staff was offered jobs this offseason, and all but one stay put. This much continuity after a big season is critical.

Texas

Out: Chris Rumph (Florida), Les Koenning, Bruce Chambers
In: Hired Brick Haley (DL), Jay Norvell (WRs), Jeff Traylor (ST/TEs)

The abrupt departure of the well-liked Rumph was a surprise, but Charlie Strong found a respected replacement in LSU’s Haley. Bringing in Norvell from the Sooners was a surprise, too, and adds a little extra juice to the rivalry. We’ll see what influence, if any, the former OC has on Texas’ plans to go up-tempo offensively. Traylor, a successful Texas high school coach, gives the Longhorns a better presence in recruiting the valuable East Texas area.

Texas Tech

Out: John Scott Jr. (New York Jets)
In: Hired David Gibbs (DC), Zac Spavital (LBs)

Nobody forced more turnovers over the past two seasons (73) than Houston. That is one of the many reasons why Gibbs was a smart hire to overhaul the Red Raiders' defense. The eighth Texas Tech DC since 2007 should bring a bit more stability, and he also brought along Spavital from Houston. Mike Smith, the interim DC last year, was retained and will now coach the defensive line in addition to keeping his co-DC title.

West Virginia

Out: Tom Bradley (UCLA), Shannon Dawson (Kentucky)
In: Hired Bruce Tall (DL)

Dawson and Bradley left for good promotions, yet it’s hard to say West Virginia took a big hit as a staff this offseason. Dawson’s departure won’t change much, as Dana Holgorsen is still overseeing the offense as its playcaller. New GA hire Michael Burchett will help Holgorsen coach the QBs. Tall returns after a four-year stint as DC at FCS Charlotte. Holgorsen still has one more hire to make: special teams coach. Once they are on board, the Big 12 coaching carousel will officially (probably) come to a stop for 2015.
We're in the middle of junior day season with multiple schools hosting prospects last weekend and others set to host elite talent this weekend. Here's the latest on the recruiting trail:

BAYLOR
Total commits: 5
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 3
The latest: Baylor hosted several elite prospects over the weekend including Plano (Texas) East prospect Anthony Hines III, an elite Class of 2017 prospect who boasts offers from most of the Big 12 as well as LSU, Ohio State and others. Fellow Class of 2017 prospects Hezekiah Jones and Jeff Okudah, who was offered over the weekend, were also in Waco for BU’s junior day as Art Briles' program focuses on this recruiting cycle and beyond.

IOWA STATE
Total commits: 0
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 0
The latest: It’s a big week for the Cyclones with spring football set to kick off and junior day this weekend. ISU also sent out some offers last week including an offer to Allen (Texas) defensive end Levi Onwuzurike. The 6-foot-3, 230-pound prospect also boasts offers from Boston College and Illinois.

KANSAS
Total commits: 2
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 0
The latest: KU held a junior day over the weekend with Wildwood (Missouri) Lafayette offensive lineman Chase Behrndt among the visitors. The Jayhawks also offered Sachse (Texas) athlete Donovan Duvernay last week. His twin brother, Devin Duvernay, is the No. 12 player in the ESPN Junior 300 and already boasted a KU offer. The Jayhawks joined Boise State as teams who have offered Donovan.

KANSAS STATE
Total commits: 2
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 0
The latest: Edmond (Oklahoma) Santa Fe linebacker Calvin Bundage has emerged as one of the rising stars in the Big 12 region as he added an offer from the Wildcats. Iowa State, Kansas, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State, TCU, Texas Tech and Michigan are among the schools who have offered the Class of 2016 safety/linebacker hybrid.

OKLAHOMA
Total commits: 3
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 1
The latest: The Sooners could have a big weekend ahead with another junior day set for March 7. New Orleans (Louisiana) Easton linebacker Pernell Jefferson is among the recruits who are set to head to Norman, Oklahoma, this weekend. TCU and Texas Tech are among the other Big 12 teams who have offered Jefferson.

OKLAHOMA STATE
Total commits: 2
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 0
The latest: Oklahoma State didn’t see any reason to wait any longer before offering Class of 2018 offensive tackle Brey Walker. The Moore (Oklahoma) Southmoore prospect is 6-foot-6, 285 pounds and excelled on the gridiron and wrestling mat during his freshman season. He’s going to be a name to watch over the next few years.

TCU
Total commits: 8
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 3
The latest: TCU hopes to go into Arkansas to grab Little Rock (Arkansas) Robinson athlete T.J. Hammonds away from the Razorbacks. The Horned Frogs offered the 5-foot-11, 186-pound prospect this week and he could be a good fit on either side of the ball for Gary Patterson’s program.

TEXAS
Total commits: 4
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 3
The latest: Texas held a junior day over the weekend with several top prospects visiting Austin, Texas, despite the weather playing havoc with the travel plans of many prospects. The Longhorns offered multiple prospects last week including OU offensive line commitment Jean Delance along with running back Darius Anderson and cornerback Eric Cuffee.

TEXAS TECH
Total commits: 3
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 0
The latest: The Red Raiders looked to the East Coast for one of its latest offers with Washington (D.C.) Woodrow Wilson running back Abdul Adams boasting an offer from Kliff Kingsbury’s program. The No. 277 player in the ESPN Junior 300, Adams has a large offer list which includes OU and West Virginia.

WEST VIRGINIA
Total commits: 4
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 0
The latest: West Virginia sent out multiple offers last week with its March 15 junior day on the horizon. Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) Imhotep running back Tylick Raynor and Southfield (Michigan) running back Matthew Falcon are among the recruits who boasted offers from the Mountaineers.

Big 12 morning links

March, 2, 2015
Mar 2
9:00
AM ET
Haven't been watching "House of Cards." How's Season 3? Lemme know in the comments. If you need a quick break between episodes, some Monday morning links:
  • TCU got started on spring ball Sunday afternoon, which capped off a pretty good weekend for Cameron Echols-Luper. The speedy returner won gold in the long jump at the Big 12 indoor track and field championships this weekend, then made it back in time for his first practice. Echols-Luper is moving from receiver to cornerback this spring and I really wouldn't be surprised if he provides a spark there once he gets comfortable.
  • Texas Tech also opened spring practice on Sunday, and a defender to keep an eye on under new DC David Gibbs is Justis Nelson. According to Don Williams of the Lubbock Avalanche-Journal, Nelson will work at corner and safety this spring and Gibbs has high hopes for him. In fact, he thinks Nelson could've nabbed as many as eight interceptions last season. Tech has established its pre-spring depth chart, but it sounds like Gibbs will have his defensive backs cross-train at multiple spots for versatility and to present different looks. Good idea.
  • Iowa State has all sorts of question marks on defense this spring, and Bobby La Gesse of the Ames Tribune does a nice job here of breaking down the biggest concerns. First and foremost, the Cyclones' staff has to figure out how to get better up the middle. I'm not surprised there's optimism about juco import Desmond Tucker at defensive tackle -- they'll need him to be good right away. There are way too many unknowns when it comes to those linebackers, too.
  • Athlon has attempted to rank the rosters of the Big 12 based on recruiting data, with Texas coming in first place (and No. 9 in the nation) ahead of Oklahoma. They're the only two Big 12 programs that cracked Athlon's top 25. Baylor is 32nd in FBS, TCU is 35th and Kansas State is 56th. Clearly they're bad at recruiting, right? I'm reluctant to share this one because, frankly, I think using recruiting rankings to evaluate a team's roster years later is an exercise that promises to produce bogus results. But, hey, people like lists.
  • Lastly, I know this isn't a football link but it's still definitely worth a share. In this SC Featured piece, Texas women's basketball player Imani McGee-Stafford opens up about how slam poetry helped her overcome her past. It's a poignant piece about an athlete who has braved a lot and found an outlet to express her pain and inspire others. Give this video a watch today.
In today's Big 12 mailbag, we discuss coaching hires, QB battles, why I hate everyone and what Big 12 apparel I have in my closet.

On to the 'bag:
Trotter: Never underestimate the power of Bill Snyder's magic wand. That said, I don't see how K-State doesn't take a step back this year without Jake Waters, Tyler Lockett, Curry Sexton, B.J. Finney, Ryan Mueller and Jonathan Truman.

Trotter: It's funny to me when a particular fan base thinks I only pick on their team. I pick on everyone, when the occasion calls for it. All 10 Big 12 fan bases have gotten mad at me at one time or another. Just check my Twitter mentions sometime.

Trotter: Right now, I have them third in the league behind TCU and Baylor. The Cowboys really don't have any weaknesses on paper, and they boast an up-and-coming quarterback in Mason Rudolph, who was fabulous in three starts last year. The schedule also lines up for the Cowboys, who get TCU, Baylor and Oklahoma in Stillwater.

Trotter: Very solid hire. Adkins has been around the block, with stints coaching offensive line at Tennessee and Georgia. Our SEC guru Chris Low really liked the hire. Doug Marrone obviously thought a lot of Adkins to bring him along from Syracuse to the Bills. Mike Gundy could have done a lot worse.

Trotter: To me, it's a two-man race between William Crest and Skyler Howard. Paul Millard is a nice veteran to have around. David Sills is a solid prospect, and we'll see what Chris Chugunov can do. But Crest's year in the system gives him an edge over the freshmen. And Howard's game experience gives him an edge over everyone.

Trotter: Considering court-storming is probably going to get banned this year, I'd go with the former.

Trotter: For one, what the Lincoln Riley offense will look like. For two, who will emerge in the QB derby. There's plenty of intrigue in Norman this spring.

Trotter: Given that Trevor Knight, Baker Mayfield and Cody Thomas all have a bunch of experience, Hansen is a long shot. Not that those three can't be beaten out. But it's going to be hard for Hansen to shine when he's going to be getting fourth-team reps.

Trotter: Pretty business-as-usual hire. Patterson oversees the defense to a large degree, anyway. By promoting in-house, he keeps that continuity, which is an obvious positive. Patterson might be more involved than when Dick Bumpas was around. But the defense is going to be similar to what we've seen in Fort Worth.

Trotter: I actually have one article of Big 12 apparel in my closet -- a pair of West Virginia sweatpants my wife's family (who are rabid Mountaineers fans) got me at the most recent family reunion (which, by the way, was in West Virginia). They're too comfortable for me to get rid of. So everyone is just going to have to deal with that.
Fully capitalizing on red-zone chances is a trait of championship teams.

Settling for field goals can cost a team a game. Worst yet, turning the ball over in the opponent's red zone can completely change momentum.

Here's a look at the Big 12's rankings in red-zone efficiency in conference games only during the past three years since TCU and West Virginia joined in 2012.

Red-zone points per drive

1. Kansas State, 5.14: The Wildcats' 64.3 red-zone touchdown percentage is the best in the Big 12. Five Wildcats (John Hubert, Collin Klein, Charles Jones, Jake Waters, Daniel Sams) rushed for at least seven red-zone touchdowns.

2. Oklahoma, 5.02: The Sooners average 3.1 yards per carry in the red zone, ranking second in the Big 12. Samaje Perine rushed for 240 yards and 14 touchdowns on 56 red-zone carries in 2014 as he erased any need for a special short yardage package for the Sooners.

3. Baylor, 4.94: The Bears have the unique ability to run defenses ragged with their speed and explosiveness yet buckle down with physical offense when needed. Baylor's 75 red-zone rushing touchdowns are the Big 12's best during this span.

4 (tied). Texas, 4.92: The Longhorns convert 50.7 percent of third-down conversions in the red zone, second in the conference but Texas' 282 total plays and 106 total drives rank eighth in the Big 12 -- a sign UT doesn't sustain long scoring drives on a consistent basis.

4 (tied). Oklahoma State, 4.92: The Cowboys scored on 85.3 percent of their red-zone drives, but a 34.8 third-down conversion rate ranked last in the Big 12. Some of OSU's offensive struggles in recent years followed them into the red zone at times.

6. Iowa State, 4.90: The Cyclones' 3.79 yards per play in the red zone sits atop the Big 12 but their 236 total red-zone plays is ninth in the conference. Paul Rhoads' team was decent when it got inside the 20-yard line but a combination of turnovers and inefficiency slowed ISU down.

7. Texas Tech, 4.79: The Red Raiders' eight red-zone turnovers helped push them down the rankings despite Tech recording a conference-best 61.9 completion percentage inside the red zone.

8. West Virginia, 4.76: The Mountaineers had a 29 touchdown-to-interception ratio in the red zone with one interception in 115 red zone attempts but their 34.9 third-down conversion percentage resulted a poor red-zone touchdown percentage (58.9 percent, eighth in Big 12).

9. TCU, 4.59: The Horned Frogs nine red-zone turnovers were the worst in the Big 12, offsetting TCU's 55.9 completion percentage and 4.88 yards per pass attempt in the red zone, which ranked second in the Big 12 in both categories.

10. Kansas, 3.72: The Jayhawks rank last in pretty much every category including yards per play (2.6), total plays (202) and yards per carry (2.14). Kansas' bad offense followed them any time they ventured within the red zone.

Red-zone points per drive allowed

1. TCU, 4.25: Gary Patterson's program sits atop the Big 12 in total plays (229), yards per play (2.85) and yards per carry (2.39) in the red zone.

2. Oklahoma State, 4.43: The Cowboys allowed 1.98 yards per carry in the red zone and nine red-zone sacks, ranking first in the Big 12, and tied TCU for first at 2.85 yards per play.

3 (tied). Kansas State, 4.64: The Wildcats were terrific on third down, allowing 35.8 percent of conversion attempts to be converted.

3 (tied). Kansas, 4.64: Kansas saw the most total plays (369) yet ranked third behind OSU and TCU in yards per play (3.08). The Jayhawks' defense also added nine red-zone turnovers forced, which is second in the conference.

5. Texas, 4.66: The Longhorns' 8.1 sack percentage in the red zone led the conference, but 33.2 percent of opponents' plays resulted in five yards or more, the worst percentage in the Big 12. It gave the defense a boom-or-bust type of feel.

6. West Virginia, 4.75: The Mountaineers faced the second-highest number of red-zone plays (364) and ranked fourth in yards per play allowed (3.17) yet allowed opponents to convert 50.6 of third-down attempts.

7. Iowa State, 4.82: The Cyclones have forced the most red-zone turnovers in the Big 12 (11) yet have allowed 80 red-zone touchdowns, tied with Kansas for eighth.

8. Oklahoma, 5.06: The Sooners' inability to force turnovers in the red zone is part of the problem as OU forced one red-zone mistake in three seasons.

9. Baylor, 5.39: Baylor's 3.58 yards per play ranked ninth in the conference and didn't record a red-zone sack in three seasons.

10. Texas Tech, 5.42: The Red Raiders allowed a 57.1 third-down conversion rate, worst in the Big 12. By comparison, TCU's 20 third-down conversion rate was the Big 12's best.
In this week's Big 12 roundtable, we examine the biggest keys for new coordinators Rob Likens, David Gibbs and Lincoln Riley.

What is the biggest key for Likens?

Chatmon: The Jayhawks need to figure out if the man who can run their offense from behind center is on campus. Michael Cummings, Montell Cozart and T.J. Millweard will get their chance this spring before a pair of freshmen, Carter Stanley and Ryan Willis, arrive. Frankly, if one of the guys on campus doesn't run away with the job this spring, Kansas should be prepared to turn to one of the freshmen and be willing to take lumps in 2015 if Stanley or Willis are clearly superior fits for the offense.

Olson: This is a start-from-scratch spring for Kansas' offense, and right now teaching is far more important than evaluation. The roster ain't great; there's really no way around that. For Likens and David Beaty, the key has to be installing and instilling an offensive vision and finding out who buys in and steps up. I'd worry about that offensive line, too. Charlie Weis and his staff did a poor job evaluating and developing there, relying too often on juco takes. That group will need extra attention this spring.

Trotter: My goodness, where do we begin? I would start with finding out who can play and who can help. Not only is the staff largely new, the players are largely new, too. No team in the Big 12 returns fewer starters than the Jayhawks. Evaluating and identifying a potential two-deep is Step 1, especially up front along the offensive line.

The biggest key for Gibbs?

Chatmon: How to take advantage of the talent the Red Raiders do have should be first on Gibbs list. Texas Tech has pieces to work with, from linebacker Pete Robertson to cornerback Nigel Bethel, so identifying the best way to take advantage of their skills is key. Gibbs' track record of building defenses that create turnovers means that will be a focus, but figuring out the players who he can trust to win their individual battles consistently then allowing them to excel is a top priority. The plan should be simple: Don't waste time trying to make up for what you don't have, invest time in maximizing what you do have.

Olson: Got to start by finding a way to consistently stop foes from doing what's easiest: running right at these Red Raiders. Opponents ran the ball nearly 50 times per game against Tech last season, 11 more than the league average. No wonder they ended up with the worst run D of all Power 5 teams. I like a lot of the pieces Tech has in its front seven entering 2015 and am curious to see what solution Gibbs can offer for perhaps their big weakness.

Trotter: I'm with Max. If the Red Raiders don't do a better job of stopping the run, then anything else Gibbs does won't matter much. The good news is Tech should be deeper up front with the addition of Breiden Fehoko to the tackle rotation. Mike Mitchell should assist in run support as a potentially sure tackler from the weak side. If the Red Raiders fare better against the run, they'll automatically fare better everywhere else, as well.

The biggest key for Riley?

Chatmon: Identifying his best players is the key for Riley. Oklahoma has talent that could have been misused in the previous offense, resulting in a lackluster passing game and a lack of balance. In other words, preconceived spring plans for how someone like Joe Mixon or Michiah Quick may fit into the system will be Riley's enemy. Once he identifies his playmakers, Riley can then mold his system around their strengths during the summer months. The players should decide what Riley's offense will look like in the fall, not OU's first-year offensive coordinator. And this spring is his chance to see what they can do.

Olson: Leadership at the quarterback position. Which passer will Sooners players rally around this spring? Who's going to do the best job of not only grasping Riley's scheme but also guiding those around him? Riley will have to do a good job of keeping a finger on the team's pulse here. There's no doubt that between Trevor Knight, Baker Mayfield and Cody Thomas, two confident and competitive guys ultimately aren't going to get their way.

Trotter: Like Brandon noted, tailoring the offense to fit the skill set of his personnel will be the key. Riley's air raid system and OU's plethora of talented running backs led by Samaje Perine, who is a between-the-tackles runner, is little like a square peg in a round hole. It can work. But it's going to be a challenge to find the right balance.
Last week, we completed a series ranking the individual position groups in the Big 12 heading into spring ball. We also weighed in with who we thought the best position units in the Big 12 are.

Now, we put to the question to you.

Who has the best individual position group (not including quarterback) in the league?

SportsNation

Who has the Big 12s best individual position group?

  •  
    23%
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    1%
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    40%
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    8%
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    28%

Discuss (Total votes: 4,260)

Despite losing Antwan Goodley off last year's team, the Baylor wide receivers are certainly in the conversation. All-Big 12 selection Corey Coleman and freshman All-American K.D. Cannon both return coming off 1,000-yard receiving seasons and form one the most prolific one-two punches at wideout in college football. The group has depth, too, with veteran Jay Lee, sophomore Davion Hall and a host of up-and-coming prospects including Ishmael Zamora, Chris Platt, Devontre Stricklin and Blake Lynch.

Receiver isn't Baylor's only stocked position, either. The Bears also bring back a devastating defensive line, headlined by a pair of first-team All-Big 12 performers in defensive end Shawn Oakman and defensive tackle Andrew Billings. Together, the two combined for 30 tackles for loss last season -- the highest total among defensive line teammates in the Big 12. Tackle Beau Blackshear is also entering his third season as a starter for the Bears.

Baylor, however, isn't the only Big 12 team with a loaded position.

Samaje Perine is back to lead an Oklahoma running back stable loaded with talent. As a true freshman, Perine led the Big 12 with more than 1,700 yards on the ground and 21 touchdowns. He also broke the FBS single-game record with 427 rushing yards against Kansas. Perine is flanked with plenty of talent in the Sooners backfield. Alex Ross led the Big 12 in kick returns last season and averaged 6.8 yards per carry as a change of pace to Perine's barreling style. Keith Ford has 94 career carries. And the Sooners will finally debut Joe Mixon, who was the gem of the 2014 signing class before being suspended for the season.

While Oklahoma will lean on the firepower of its backfield, West Virginia will be relying on a secondary overflowing with talent. Strong safety Karl Joseph, who has forged a reputation as the league's hardest hitter, will be entering his fourth year as a starter. He could emerge as a Big 12 Defensive Player of the Year candidate. Dravon Henry is coming off a freshman All-American campaign after starting every game at free safety during his season in Morgantown. Daryl Worley is one of the top returning cornerbacks in the league. And West Virginia signed two more would-be contributors in ESPN 300 defensive back Tyrek Cole and ESPN 50 JC corner Rasul Douglas.

Lastly, we'd be remiss if we didn't include a position group from early Big 12 2015 favorite TCU. The Horned Frogs are obviously strong at several positions. But for the purpose of this exercise, we'll actually feature their special teams units. All-Big 12 kicker Jaden Oberkrom will be a four-year starter. Punter Ethan Perry will be a four-year starter, as well. Cameron Echols-Luper is back after ranking 16th in the country in punt returns. The Horned Frogs have several players with kickoff return experience. And, not only did they lead the country in punt return coverage last year, they became the first team to allow negative punt return yards in the 14 seasons the statistic has been tracked. The TCU special teams have no weaknesses.

Now, it's your to weigh in.

Tell us who you think the best individual position group in the Big 12 is by voting in our weekly Big 12 poll.
Success on third downs can decide games.

Coaches focus on it, quarterbacks can become stars and defenders can become feared by stepping up to another level on those key moments. Here's a look at the Big 12's third-down conversion rate rankings, offensively and defensively, in Big 12 games during the three seasons since TCU and West Virginia joined the conference in 2012.

Third-down conversion rate
  1. Kansas State, 47.1 percent
  2. Baylor, 45.5 percent
  3. Oklahoma, 44.4 percent
  4. Texas, 42 percent
  5. Texas Tech, 41.7 percent
  6. West Virginia, 39.6 percent
  7. Iowa State, 36.9 percent
  8. TCU, 35.5 percent
  9. Oklahoma State, 35.3 percent
  10. Kansas, 30.8 percent
Third-down conversion rate allowed
  1. TCU, 31.2 percent
  2. Texas, 36.6 percent
  3. Oklahoma State, 38.5 percent
  4. West Virginia, 39.6 percent
  5. Oklahoma, 40 percent
  6. Kansas State, 41.2 percent
  7. Texas Tech, 42.5 percent
  8. Iowa State, 42.5 percent
  9. Kansas, 42.7 percent
  10. Baylor, 42.9 percent

Here are some team-by-team thoughts:

Baylor: Clearly the Bears offense overcomes the Bears defensive struggles on third down. The Bears offense had 68 drives without a first down out of 291 drives in the past three seasons. Good quarterback play from Bryce Petty and Nick Florence have played a key role as well as a solid running game that has picked up 90 first downs on the ground, best in the Big 12.

Iowa State: Ranking in the bottom half in both categories is not a good look for Paul Rhoads program. Limited production at the quarterback position and 14 third-down sacks from the defense have played a major role as well as injuries to key players like Quenton Bundrage in 2014 and Tom Farniok in 2013 have made life a lot harder on the Cyclones.

Kansas: The only team to rank in the bottom two in both categories, it's easy to see why David Beaty is taking charge in Lawrence, Kansas. It's somewhat surprising to see the Jayhawk defense so far down the list but KU had 13 third-down sacks during this span. And the quarterback position has been a major problem at KU since Todd Reesing left in 2009.

Kansas State: Yet again the Wildcats efficient offense leads the Big 12 in a key category. Strong quarterback play from Collin Klein and Jake Waters along with receiver Tyler Lockett made KSU very difficult to stop. To see Bill Snyder's team in the bottom half of the conference in conversion allowed rate is a surprise but the Wildcats have a hard time getting three-and-outs. KSU's 17.8 three-and-out percentage on defense is only better than KU's 17.7.

Oklahoma: The Sooners offense has been good on third down despite some of its recent struggles while the defense has been very average. Offensively, OU has done a good job of getting its playmakers, namely Jalen Saunders and Sterling Shepard, involved on third-down plays. Defensively, the Sooners have talented players, like Eric Striker, yet sit middle of the road in third down defense.

Oklahoma State: Seeing the Cowboys near the bottom on the list in offensive conversion rate will make Cowboy fans long for the days of Brandon Weeden and Justin Blackmon. OSU's defense has been consistently good on third down and its third-down production was one of the reasons for the Cowboys recent Big 12 title contention. OSU's offense will need to be a lot better if the Pokes hope to surprise in 2015.

Texas: UT's 37 sacks is one key reason the Longhorns are among the Big 12's top third-down defenses. The surprise is the Longhorns offense sitting in the top half of the conference, ahead of Texas Tech, West Virginia and Oklahoma State, who have generally put together more productive offenses. It's a sign UT's offense has had its moments of offensive precision even if the bad moments are the most memorable.

Texas Tech: The Red Raiders haven't been great on third down but they haven't been horrible either. Improving the turnover margin is priority No. 1 for Kliff Kingsbury as the offense turns the ball over and the defense doesn't take the ball away. Once that is handled, then Tech can work on improving third down conversion rates.

TCU: The Horned Frogs defense is stellar in nearly every category, ranking first in the Big 12 in yards per play allowed (4.62) and yards per carry allowed (2.13) on third down. Its offense was terrible on third down before the 2014 season, when it converted 42.9 percent on its third down attempts. TCU could end up in the top third of the conference in both categories in 2015 unless Gary Patterson's program takes a step backward this fall.

West Virginia: The Mountaineers haven't been particularly good on either side of the ball. WVU's struggles to stop the pass on defense -- 13.63 yards per completion on third down -- have hampered WVU's ability to get off the field. On offense, uneven quarterback play after Geno Smith's departure doomed the Mountaineers to finish in the middle of the pack.
It is an important spring for several players in the Big 12.

Some are fighting to keep their jobs, others are trying not to be forgotten and others have to fight off lauded Class of 2015 recruits. Here's a look at several Big 12 players who have plenty to gain during spring football.

Chris Johnson, QB, Baylor: With Seth Russell as the clear favorite to replace Bryce Petty as the starting quarterback, Johnson needs a strong spring to ensure the competition continues into the fall. He’ll also need to hold off highly regarded true freshman Jarrett Stidham.

Vernell Trent, DT, Iowa State: Trent had a decent redshirt freshman season, starting three games and finishing with 10 tackles in 2014. But ISU signed a pair of defensive tackles in the Class of 2015 with an eye on Demond Tucker and Bobby Leath becoming immediate impact performers. A good spring would help Trent secure a spot in the Cyclones’ defense.

[+] EnlargeMontell Cozart
Grant Halverson/Getty ImagesMontell Cozart must impress the new Kansas coaching staff this spring.
Montell Cozart, QB, Kansas: The junior went from unquestioned starting quarterback to afterthought in a span of a few months. Former coach Charlie Weis anointed Cozart to be the Jayhawks' quarterback of the future, but he faltered and eventually was replaced by Michael Cummings in 2014. If Cozart has any hope making a major impact during his Jayhawks career, he needs to impress the new coaching staff this spring.

Judah Jones, WR, Kansas State: The Wildcats are hoping to replace the playmaking skills of Tyler Lockett. One player isn’t going to do it, but Jones has the upside to become a key player in KSU’s offense while also making an impact on special teams. KSU has several other options at receiver, so Jones needs to rise above the competition if he hopes to separate himself this spring.

Trevor Knight, QB, Oklahoma: The junior has started 15 games during the past two seasons but faces stern competition to keep his starting spot with Texas Tech transfer Baker Mayfield becoming eligible in the fall. As Lincoln Riley brings his version of the Air Raid to OU, many assume Mayfield is the best bet to trigger the attack. Knight can use the spring to remind everyone of his unique physical gifts.

Marcell Ateman, WR, Oklahoma State: It’s time for Ateman to step up and separate himself at the receiver spot. At 6-foot-4 and 210 pounds, he brings size, speed and ball skills that are tough to duplicate, but he doesn’t dominate the way he should. With plenty of competition at the position, he needs to show he is ready to match his All-Big 12 talent with All-Big 12 production.

Daje Johnson, WR, Texas: When he touches the ball, Johnson looks like the dynamic playmaker the Longhorns have longed for during the past few seasons, but he constantly takes himself out of the equation by making bad decisions off the field. This spring is the opportunity for him to show he has the focus needed to make his final season on the 40 acres a breakout year.

Foster Sawyer and Grayson Muehlstein, QBs, TCU: The battle to back up Trevone Boykin should be interesting, so the spring gives Sawyer and Muehlstein the chance to lay claim to the No. 2 spot. Both quarterbacks should get plenty of chances to impress and the winner of the backup quarterback derby could set himself up to take over in 2016.

Davis Webb, QB, Texas Tech: A strong finish to the 2014 season by Patrick Mahomes has resulted in Webb being overlooked in many ways, but a healthy Webb was productive during his first two seasons in Kliff Kingsbury's program. The job is open heading into spring and Webb can make sure the quarterback battle in Lubbock is one of the most interesting aspects of Big 12 football in the spring.

Daikiel Shorts, WR, West Virginia: The Mountaineers need to fill the void left by Kevin White and Mario Alford. Shorts has been a contributor to the WVU offense since his true freshman season but hasn’t really developed into a game-changing target. This spring will give him the chance to show he can be a primary target for Dana Holgorsen's team.

Ranking the Big 12 coaching jobs

February, 25, 2015
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This week, ESPN.com ranked the best Power 5 coaching jobs in college football, No. 1 through 65. Below is how we rank the jobs in the Big 12:

1. Texas
The Longhorns have unlimited financial resources with a massive donor base. They are located in the middle of one of the country's pre-eminent recruiting hotbeds, too.

2. Oklahoma
The Sooners have one of the great traditions in college football, a recruiting pipeline into Texas and a supportive administration.

3. Oklahoma State
Thanks to Boone Pickens, Oklahoma State boasts facilities that take a backseat to no one. Over the past 10 years, few teams have won more than the Cowboys, either.

4. Baylor
This job would have ranked near the bottom not long ago. But Art Briles has whipped Baylor into a powerhouse. The Bears have a new stadium, a budding fan base and a brand that seems to be resonating with young recruits.

5. TCU
Facilities and conference used to be impediments for the Horned Frogs. Not anymore. TCU has a newly renovated stadium and state-of-the-art facilities, including an air-conditioned practice facility. TCU's proximity to the Metroplex makes it an attractive recruiting destination, too.

6. Texas Tech
Unlike West Virginia, Kansas State, Iowa State and Kansas, the Red Raiders are located in the Lone Star State, which gives them a proximity advantage in recruiting. Texas Tech also has rabid fans and a strong donor base in the Midland/Odessa area, which is pumping money into the stadium renovation.

7. West Virginia
The Mountaineers have severe recruiting challenges, with the lack of in-state talent. Still, this is the equivalent of a pro team in the state, and it has the backing necessary to win.

8. Kansas State
Nobody does more with less than Bill Snyder. Manhattan has never been a recruiting destination. But the Wildcats have passionate fans (as the court rushing in basketball the other night demonstrated) who make Bill Snyder Family Stadium a tough place to play. The Wildcats also have been making impressive facility upgrades, most recently to the Vanier Football Complex.

9. Iowa State
The Cyclones have obstacles with a small in-state recruiting pool they also have to share with Iowa. The elimination of the Big 12 North hurt Iowa State as well. But the Cyclones have something Kansas does not -- and that's a fan base committed to football.

10. Kansas
Only eight years ago, Mark Mangino took Kansas to the Orange Bowl. It seems even more amazing now. The Jayhawks are behind the rest of the league in every area, from attendance to facilities.

Big 12 Tuesday mailbag

February, 24, 2015
Feb 24
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In Tuesday's mailbag, Oklahoma State's defense, Baylor/TCU and Bryce Petty's future are among the topics. As always, thanks for your questions (and thanks for not asking about expansion this time around). To submit questions for next week's mailbag, click here.

Christian in Missoula, Montana, writes: Even though I love James Castleman and Ofa Hautau, neither seem to be getting much of a sniff from the NFL. Based on this and the players that we brought in to play defensive tackle and the younger guys moving up, is it crazy to think that we could be better across the board on defense next season? Would you be that surprised if Okstate had the best overall defense next year?

Brandon Chatmon: I fully expect Oklahoma State to be better defensively next season than it was in 2014. All those talented young players will be experienced, talented young players along with defensive end Emmanuel Ogbah, safety Jordan Sterns and cornerback Kevin Peterson returning to be among the Big 12’s best at their positions. The Cowboys have a ways to go before they can lay claim to the best overall defense moniker, however, as OSU still needs to replace that duo at defensive tackle to help take pressure off Ogbah and a playmaking linebacker needing to emerge to become the missing piece of the puzzle.


David in Dallas writes: After looking at the position by position rankings, were you surprised to see Baylor on top over TCU? Knowing you guys view these two as the upper echelon of the Big 12, are the deciding factors for TCU as the favorite simply Trevone Boykin and playing in Fort Worth?

BC: I wasn’t really surprised, David. BU is built to last with talent up and down the roster. Boykin is definitely the determining factor for me as a legit preseason Heisman candidate who creates problems that are difficult to answer for any defense. Anytime a team has the best quarterback in the league surrounded by a talented roster, that’s always going to be tough to beat. Boykin makes TCU the favorite with BU right on the heels of the Horned Frogs.


Scotty in Waco, Texas, writes: Why is Bryce Petty being projected as a 3rd-4th round pick? Big guy, big arm, can move, proven winner in college. Does it have anything to do with RG3's struggles translating his game to the NFL? Is that fair? Bryce's play in college seems to warrant a first round pick.

BC: I’d imagine Robert Griffin’s struggles may play a role but not a huge one. I’m not a draft expert but questions about how Petty can transition out of BU’s offense into an NFL attack and his ability to handle pressure seem to be holding him back a bit. He had a solid showing at the combine, which should help, but it doesn’t seem like he will rise into the first round barring something unforeseen. It may cost him money on the front end but landing in a good situation should be more important to Petty. We all know mistakes are made on draft day as nobody is batting 100 percent and lower picks outperform first-rounders each year. Going to a good organization, not one full of chaos, is critical for Petty. Or any draftee, to be honest.


Mike McGown in Katy, Texas, writes: I don't understand why you guys rated BU as 4th best in position ratings when it comes to QB. Totally understand Boykin/TCU at #1. But OSU & TTU ahead of BU? Seriously? Look at the track record: RG3/Florence/Petty in successive years--not to mention Seth Russell threw for more than 800 yards and looked pretty doggone good doing it (and running too). Please, justify or rectify. Thanks! Sic ‘em!

BC: I can think of several reasons but I’ll just go with this one: Oklahoma State and Texas Tech, barring a transfer or injury, are guaranteed to go into the 2015 season with a backup quarterback who has won a Big 12 game. Can Baylor say the same? So there’s no reason to just slot the Bears at No. 2 automatically, regardless of the track record of Art Briles’ program. That said, I don’t think anyone would be surprised if the Bears are No. 1 or 2 in the postseason rankings because there’s plenty of talent in Waco. I mean, there’s a reason TCU and Baylor are still clear favorites in my mind despite uncertainty at quarterback for the Bears. I don’t expect that offense to take a step backward no matter who wins that job, but Baylor should not be ahead of OSU or Tech in a pre-spring ranking.


Dagger in Salinas, California, writes: Do you think there is any chance of the Power 5 conferences getting together enough to arrange an five-way interconference challenge for one of the weeks of non-conference play? Reserve one (or 2) weeks. Let each conference (coaches/athletic directors) seed their own teams. Randomly select opponents. 1's play 1's or 2's, and lasts play lasts or second to lasts so everyone is getting a comparable opponent, and there can be a bit more rational basis for selecting playoff teams , no more skating by on cupcake non-conference schedule and whining about being left out.

BC: I love the idea, Dagger, and I’d love to see something similar come into play at some point in the future. But we’re a long way off from something like this becoming reality and all the negotiation and politics involved would be draining. Are you willing do the rest of us a favor and take care of that part? Thanks!
A potential first-round pick and one of the Big 12’s top young defensive coaches have left Oklahoma since the end of the 2014 season, leaving the Sooners searching for answers at the defensive tackle position. The quarterback derby will get the headlines, but here’s a look at another key position battle at OU this spring.

Departed: Defensive tackle Jordan Phillips was an anchor of the Sooners' defense, which finished among the nation’s leaders in run defense. Phillips decided to leave early for the NFL, leaving a hole in the middle of OU’s defense. In addition, veteran Chuka Ndulue, who could play anywhere along the defensive line, has exhausted his eligibility.

Spring contenders: Redshirt freshman Courtney Garnett, sophomore Matthew Romar, sophomore Charles Walker, junior Jordan Wade.

Summer contenders: Neville Gallimore (No. 165 in ESPN 300), Marquise Overton (No. 175 in ESPN 300)

The skinny: Phillips and defensive line coach Jerry Montgomery have departed yet the defensive tackle position in Norman remains in good shape. Romar had a solid redshirt freshman season and should help fill the void left by Phillips. Walker joins Romar to give the Sooners a pair of quality sophomores with terrific upside and brings versatility to the defensive line. He showed flashes, particularly with his five tackles and 0.5 sacks against Clemson in the Russell Athletic Bowl. Wade is one of the strongest players on the team and has shown he can hold his own after replacing a injured Phillips and starting eight games as a redshirt freshman during the 2013 season. Behind that trio OU has three highly regarded recruits in Gallimore, Overton and Garnett, who have the physical talent to force their way into the rotation. New defensive line coach Diron Reynolds has plenty of young talent to work with as he looks to replace Phillips.

Prediction: Between Walker, Romar and Wade, the Sooners should be able to replace Phillips’ 39 tackles, seven tackles for loss and two sacks. Romar and Walker have the potential to become a pair of disruptive players in the interior while Wade can play the anchor role with his strength and size. If any of the three youngsters steps up and earns a role, OU could end up with the deepest group of interior linemen in the conference.
West Virginia receiver Kevin White was one of the stars of the combine, Kansas State's Tyler Lockett made a statement, and a trio of TCU Horned Frogs disappointed.

It was a busy few days at the NFL combine in Indianapolis as former Big 12 stars tried to impress during the NFL's annual interview process. Here's a recap of the top Big 12 performers at the NFL combine.

Headliner: Kevin White, WR, West Virginia. One of the stars of the combine with his 4.35 40-yard dash time. Heading into the weekend his 40 time was considered a potential determining factor as analysts tried to separate White, Alabama’s Amari Cooper and Louisville’s Devante Parker. The former Mountaineer might have cemented himself atop the list of receivers and could find himself in the top 10.

Made some money: Tyler Lockett, WR, Kansas State. The Wildcats all-time leading receiver erased any questions about his speed. His 4.4 was among the best receiver times, and he backed it up with a 4.07 in the 20-yard shuttle and 11.14 in the 60-yard shuttle. His playmaking during his four years spoke volumes about his talent and he just reiterated those skills with a stellar combine. Overshadowed, again: Mario Alford, WR, West Virginia. Much like the 2014 season, White grabbed the headlines while Alford was quietly productive. He was among the combine's top performers in the three-cone drill (6.64), 20-yard shuttle (4.07) and 60-yard shuttle (11.22). Alford also ran a 4.43 40-yard dash with a 34-inch vertical. One for the future: Blake Bell, TE, Oklahoma. The tight end position, as a whole, was underwhelming. But Bell was one of the top performers while recording a 4.8 40-yard dash, 4.32 20-yard shuttle and 11.81 60-yard shuttle. He's raw and inexperienced at the tight end spot, but he proved his athleticism at the combine which could convince a team that his long-term upside is worth taking a chance on. "Well, at least I have pro day": It was a rough weekend for a trio of TCU standouts. Linebacker Paul Dawson Jr., safety Chris Hackett and cornerback Kevin White disappointed at the combine. Dawson ran a 4.93 40-yard dash, Hackett ran a 4.81 40-yard dash, and White ran a 4.63 in Indianapolis. They'll get the chance to redeem themselves during TCU's pro day on March 27. All three players earned All-Big 12 honors in 2014 but their slow times will force teams to take another look at their game film and adds pressure to excel at their pro days. Dawson's post-combine tweet pretty much sums up the situation for the TCU trio. Keep an eye on: Ben Heeney, LB, Kansas: The Jayhawks best player had a strong showing at the combine. The Big 12’s leader in tackles per game was among the combine’s top performers in the 40-yard dash (4.59), three-cone drill (6.68), 20-yard shuttle (4.00) and 60-yard shuttle (11.06). Those strong numbers could spark teams to take a deeper look at his chances of being an impact player on the next level.

Big 12 morning links

February, 24, 2015
Feb 24
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It was good to see Kevin White, Tyler Lockett and Bryce Petty among the Big 12 players who helped themselves during the combine. And here's hoping the TCU trio can redeem themselves at pro day.
  • Dustin Garrison has decided to leave West Virginia. The running back is set to graduate and should be eligible to play immediately at his next school. It's not a major blow to the Mountaineers, as Garrison managed 20 carries for 92 yards as a junior. WVU has Rushel Shell, Wendell Smallwood, Andrew Buie and redshirt freshman Dontae Thomas-Williams coming off a solid season on the scout team. Garrison's decision to leave is the best move for both parties and he could be a quality pickup for any team searching for help at running back.
  • Former Oklahoma State defensive tackle James Castleman has been working out alongside people who have suffered catastrophic injuries, writes Kyle Fredrickson of The Oklahoman. It's pushed Castleman, who wasn't invitied to the NFL combine, to work harder as he prepares to try to earn a spot in the NFL. I was surprised Castleman didn't earn an invite to the combine so I wouldn't be surprised if he ends up getting drafted, particularly with a strong showing at OSU's pro day.
  • Everyone associated with Texas Tech expects more from the Red Raiders next season, reports Tim Griffin of the San Antonio Express-News. Kliff Kingsbury found the 4-8 season to be motivating while athletic director Kirby Hocutt remains certain that Kingsbury is the right guy to get Tech back on track. And there's no reason to assume he isn't. The Red Raiders are recruiting well but there's no doubt Kingsbury needs to start a conference winning streak after going 6-12 in the Big 12 during his first two seasons. Tech fans shouldn't be impatient with Kingsbury because there aren't a lot of people who want to get things right or care more about Tech football than he does.
  • Oklahoma inside receivers coach Cale Gundy insists the Sooners are going to run the ball in Lincoln Riley's new offense, writes Guerin Emig of the Tulsa World. It's odd that people think Riley wouldn't run the ball and the myth that "Air Raid" style attacks don't run the ball is getting odd. Mike Leach is the only one who really sticks to the pass only philosophy (79.6 pass percentage) at Washington State. Riley's ECU offense was among the top five among FBS teams in pass percentage but at a much lower 62.5 pass percentage in 2014. Time will tell how much the Sooners run the ball, but I'd be surprised if Riley doesn't put together a balanced offense during his first season in charge.
  • Texas landed a quarterback for the Class of 2016 with Shane Buechele deciding to commit to the Longhorns. Buechele, the No. 246 player in the ESPN Jr300, had offers from Oklahoma, TCU, Texas Tech and others. UT has offered several quarterbacks in the Class of 2016 and would be wise to continue to pursue some of those signal callers even with Buechele's commitment. Not only does UT need more options at the position, they would be wise to have Plan B, C and D in place if Buechele changes his mind late in the process like Zack Gentry did during the last recruiting cycle.

Big 12 recruiting scorecard

February, 23, 2015
Feb 23
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Junior day season is still underway, and that means a lot more offers and new names on the radar. Here's the latest on the 2016 recruiting trail in the Big 12:

BAYLOR
Total commits: 5
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 3
The latest: Baylor running back commit Kameron Martin received an offer from Texas last week, but so far that move hasn't been enough to flip him. The ESPN Junior 300 back is a cousin of former Texas great Jamaal Charles and has called UT his "dream school," but Baylor was the first to offer and he's been a loyal pledge to the Bears since July 2014.

IOWA STATE
Total commits: 0
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 0
The latest: The Cyclones were the first to offer 6-foot-5 tight end T.J. Hockenson of Chariton, Iowa. He landed his offer during a junior day visit and put up serious numbers as a junior: 73 catches, 1,116 yards and 18 touchdowns. Hockenson is expected to take a junior day trip to Kansas State as well.

KANSAS
Total commits: 2
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 0
The latest: The Jayhawks locked up their second commitment of 2016 from Antoine Frazier, a 6-foot-5, 250-pound offensive tackle from Huffman, Texas, who pledged one day after receiving an offer. Frazier was a high school teammate of KU early enrollee receiver Chase Harrell at Huffman.

KANSAS STATE
Total commits: 2
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 0
The latest: One of the many recruits hoping for an offer at Kansas State's junior day Feb. 28 will be Ian Rudzik, a linebacker/running back from Ulysses, Kansas, who visited KU earlier this month. The 6-foot-1, 215-pound junior is drawing interest from Arizona State and Minnesota, but a KSU offer might end his recruitment quickly.

OKLAHOMA
Total commits: 3
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 1
The latest: Though Oklahoma only picked up one commitment from its junior day last weekend, the Sooners did make progress with a number of key targets in the state of Texas. ESPN Junior 300 defensive end Marvin Terry, defensive tackle Chris Daniels and lineman Kellen Diesch all emerged with positive reviews and will be intriguing targets moving forward.

OKLAHOMA STATE
Total commits: 2
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 0
The latest: Oklahoma State went to the juco ranks for its second pledge of 2016. Fort Scott (Kansas) Community College cornerback Malik Kearse picked the Cowboys on Thursday. He originally hails from Miami, but an elbow injury in his senior year of high school meant no offers. Kearse logged two interceptions and 10 pass breakups in his first year at Fort Scott.

TCU
Total commits: 8
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 3
The latest: TCU hosted another big junior day on Saturday and received a commitment from offensive lineman Austin Myers of Manvel, Texas. The Horned Frogs also made offers to ATH Tyrell Alexander, TE Donte Coleman and 2017 ATH Roshauud Paul and were able to get ESPN Junior 300 running back Trayveon Williams and corner Jared Mayden on campus.

TEXAS
Total commits: 3
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 2
The latest: Texas made a ton of offers this week, and most of them went to quarterbacks. LSU commit Feleipe' Franks, Oregon commit Seth Green, Texas Tech commit Tristen Wallace and Baylor commit Zach Smith all picked up Texas offers, as did uncommitted passers Xavier Gaines, Woody Barrett and Bowman Sells. Considering the Horns' depth issues at QB, taking two in this class might make sense.

TEXAS TECH
Total commits: 3
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 0
The latest: The Red Raiders landed their third commitment of the 2016 class from running back Da'Leon Ward of powerhouse Dallas Skyline. The all-purpose back picked Tech over TCU and rushed for 1,779 yards and 20 touchdowns as a junior, but he is still expected to take more visits despite his pledge.

WEST VIRGINIA
Total commits: 4
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 0
The latest: West Virginia is reportedly expected to get an unofficial visit from defensive end Shavar Manuel this spring. The nation's No. 2 overall 2016 recruit has Florida State in the lead following his FSU junior day trip, but WVU is on Manuel's list of upcoming trips along with Clemson, Florida, LSU and Virginia Tech.

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Big 12 2015 Recruiting Overview
National recruiting analysts Tom Luginbill and Craig Haubert discuss the top 2015 recruiting classes in the Big 12.
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