Weekend recruiting wrap: Big 12 

September, 23, 2014
Sep 23
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September has been an interesting month, and it’s only going to get even more intriguing in the land of recruiting. Texas flipped an ESPN 300 player, and Baylor landed another skill-position threat. Additionally, West Virginia made an impact on an ESPN 300 player, and Texas Tech looked west at a couple of big-time prospects.

Here are some of the highlights from the week of Big 12 recruiting.

Big 12 morning links

September, 23, 2014
Sep 23
8:00
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I knew the Coke-for-tickets deal at Michigan was too good (or too bad?) to be true. Darn. On to the links...
  • Oklahoma's battle to get Baker Mayfield eligible remains ongoing, reports Ryan Aber of The Oklahoman. Bob Stoops alluded to having some new info, but OU is not ready to announce anything, and a TV report that Mayfield has been ruled immediately eligible appears to be premature or incorrect. You get the sense that, in this complicated appeals process, there's probably more that still needs to play out before Stoops can say anything definitive. If Mayfield is cleared -- and that's still a real if -- I'm curious if OU's perceived reluctance to let Trevor Knight run the ball (at least against West Virginia) will be impacted.
  • The Iron Skillet game is going to have a different vibe this year. This time, TCU is facing a winless SMU team that recently changed coaches. Gary Patterson isn't too interested in talking about what's going on with his crosstown rival, writes Carlos Mendez of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, saying the Mustangs' shakeup is "no concern to TCU." He's just trying to get to win No. 3. TCU's less-than-stellar 2013 offense put up 48 on SMU. You'd think this year's group should have an even easier time.
  • A Kansas team with a winning record is about to face a Texas team with a losing record for the first time in literally forever. Charlie Weis isn't taking the 1-2 Longhorns lightly, writes Matt Tait of the Lawrence Journal-World. The Jayhawks head coach makes what is probably an important observation for both teams: KU isn't going to win a shootout and has to adopt a mindset of surviving slugfests. The same is definitely true of Texas and its offense right now. Texas is a 14-point favorite right now, but could we be in for a game that plays out much closer than expected?
  • Kliff Kingsbury discussed two QBs on Monday: one from his past, one from his future. Now that Jarrett Stidham has signed, Kingsbury can publicly laud the Stephenville (Texas) High senior. He and OC Eric Morris got a chance to watch the incoming Texas Tech early enrollee play this weekend and were wowed by his leadership and demeanor. Kingsbury also talked up OSU's Daxx Garman, whom he pursued while at Houston, and isn't surprised by his early success.
  • Art Briles and Baylor's sports information staff have another ally in the push to get Bryce Petty in the Heisman race: Iowa State coach Paul Rhoads. On Monday, Rhoads told reporters Petty is the Heisman frontrunner in his book, according to Bobby La Gesse of the Ames Tribune. Rhoads and his players are rightfully in awe of what Petty and the Bears' offense appears capable of this season. I don't think the Cyclones' love is an act, either -- it's respect, especially after Baylor handed ISU a 71-7 loss in Waco last year.
video

In the wake of David Ash's concussion battle, Tre' Newton, Nolan Brewster and Kendall Thompson discuss their experiences with sustaining concussions and the subsequent decisions they made for their careers and individual health.

David Ash: 'Awesome days ahead'

September, 22, 2014
Sep 22
4:01
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video

AUSTIN, Texas -- After three difficult weeks of contemplation, David Ash is ready to move on from football and begin the rest of his life.

The former Texas Longhorns quarterback held a 25-minute news conference Monday and offered his first public comments since his concussion symptoms returned after an Aug. 30 win against North Texas.

He explained why, after consulting with Texas coach Charlie Strong and team doctors, he knew he needed to stop playing in the interest of his health and future.

"I'm at peace with that. God has given me a peace," Ash said. "I have a lot of hope and a lot of belief that there's still awesome days ahead for me."

Ash said he experienced headaches for seven or eight days after the 38-7 victory over North Texas, his first game since September 2013. That painful week brought some needed closure.

"At the core of my heart of hearts," Ash said, "I knew I shouldn't be playing."

Ash reported his concussion-related symptoms to Texas trainers in the hours after beating North Texas. He watched film of that game later and could tell he wasn't playing like normal.

"The real deal about the North Texas game is, I really didn't get hit," Ash said. "I didn't get a vicious blow."

Ash still has not disclosed how many concussions he suffered in the past year beyond the first one, which occurred late in a Sept. 6, 2013, loss at BYU. He has not experienced memory loss and is hopeful he's done dealing with those symptoms.

Still, the process of accepting he must retire was difficult. Team doctors told Ash that, if he were their son, they wouldn't let him play.

"It's been hard," he said. "I've met my quota for crying for the next 10 years."


(Read full post)


video

Danny Kanell discusses Texas' slow start and if Longhorns coach Charlie Strong is in danger of losing the locker room.

Big 12 Power Rankings: Week 4

September, 21, 2014
Sep 21
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Mailbag: On K-State, OU-WVU, Tech woes

September, 19, 2014
Sep 19
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In today’s Twitter mailbag, we discuss Kansas State's future after the hard-fought loss to Auburn, the big game between Oklahoma and West Virginia and Texas Tech's defensive problems.

On to the 'bag:

Trotter: The K-State game should make Oklahoma fans a little queasy. The week before meeting the Wildcats on Oct. 18, the Sooners play Texas. The same weekend, the Wildcats will be off. We saw Thursday night how good Bill Snyder is at drawing up a game plan with an extra week to prepare. And this time, his opponent won't have the extra week as well.

Trotter: The good news for Tech is that Oklahoma State's offensive line hasn't exactly dominated, either. But the Cowboys have good backs and they create creases by spreading the field. Though Daxx Garman can't run like J.W. Walsh, he can stretch the field to open up the running game with his arm. That said, if Tech gets steamrolled up front by an Oklahoma State offensive line that even Mike Gundy has termed as "very below average," the Red Raiders might very well get steamrolled by all comers the rest of the way.

Trotter: You're not going to like this answer, but I think it comes down to recruiting better players more than anything else, especially along the defensive line. There isn't a scheme out there that can account for a team's defensive front getting blown off the ball the way Tech's did against Arkansas. The Red Raiders can be better defensively than they were against the Hogs. But ultimately, you either have the horses or you don't.

Trotter: Brandon got the plum assignment of covering the stadium unveiling against SMU. At the moment, I'm not sure yet when exactly I'll be assigned to go down to Waco. But when I do, I'm going to see if I can find a spot in the Baylor Armada.

Trotter: It's a big loss, no doubt. Ford has been OU's best all-around back. But the Sooners are better equipped to deal with the loss of Ford than West Virginia is the loss of standout cornerback Daryl Worley.

Trotter: The fact that Kansas State, Oklahoma State and West Virginia hung tough against Auburn, Florida State and Alabama will do nothing but strengthen the perception of the Big 12 in the eyes of the playoff selection committee. I don't think the committee will get overly focused on scoring differentials. But Oklahoma (or Baylor) beating the Wildcats, Cowboys and Mountaineers would be viewed as quality wins, based on how those three opponents performed in their nonconference schedules.

Trotter: Did you not see the Duke score? I guess anything is possible. But there's reason why Kansas is 1-29 in its last 30 Big 12 games.

Trotter: Why would I trade away the league's best basketball program? And why would you want to trade away an automatic win for whatever team you pull for?


Matt H. writes: Is there a chance for Clint Trickett or Kevin White to be mentioned in the Heisman race if they keep performing at the high level they are playing at right now?

Trotter: White has no shot, if only because receivers don't win Heisman Trophies. But if Trickett lights up a really good Oklahoma defense Saturday, he might begin to generate a little buzz as a possible darkhorse contender.

 

Big 12 true freshman power rankings

September, 19, 2014
Sep 19
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Going into the fourth weekend of the season, we’ve updated our Big 12 true freshman power rankings again, which we’ll be revising occasionally throughout the year. Again, this list combines both opportunity and impact.

The rankings:

1. K.D. Cannon, WR, Baylor (previous rank: 2): Cannon has been nothing short of spectacular while temporarily taking over the role as Baylor’s No. 1 receiver with Levi Norwood, Clay Fuller, Corey Coleman and Antwan Goodley all out with injuries. In three games, Cannon leads the nation with 471 receiving yards, while averaging 33.6 yards per catch. No other Big 12 receiver is averaging more than 25 yards per catch. This is a future star in the making.

2. Samaje Perine, RB, Oklahoma (3): Perine has been stout as Oklahoma’s power back, but will only see his role expand after the leg injury to Keith Ford. While splitting carries with Ford and Alex Ross, Perine has still rushed for 177 yards while averaging 5.5 yards a carry. Ross is expected to get the start at West Virginia, but don’t be surprised if Perine gets the most work.

3. Dravon Henry, FS, West Virginia (1): Henry has kept his starting job, though has been rather quiet since shining in West Virginia’s opener against Alabama. He’ll face another huge challenge this weekend against the balanced Sooners.

4. Dimitri Flowers, FB, Oklahoma (5): Flowers continues to be an instrumental part of Oklahoma’s powerful rushing attack. He hasn’t seen the ball much. But he has paved the way with his lead blocks for Ford, Perine and Ross and an Oklahoma ground game that averaging 5.6 yards per rushing attempt.

5. Allen Lazard, WR, Iowa State (7): Lazard led the Cyclones in receiving in their 20-17 victory over the Hawkeyes. He also hauled in a key pass on Iowa State’s game-winning drive late in the fourth quarter. With Quenton Bundrage out for the season, Lazard has taken over as Iowa State’s go-to receiver on the outside.

6. Davion Hall, WR, Baylor (4): Like Cannon, Hall has made the most of his opportunities as the rest of the Baylor receiving corps recovers from injuries. He’s currently 10th in the league with 192 receiving yards.

7. Elijah Lee, LB, Kansas State (9): Lee didn't have much of an impact Thursday night against Auburn, but he still ranks fifth in the league with 2.5 sacks. Bill Snyder leans against playing true freshmen, but Lee has earned his trust.

8. Justin Stockton, RB, Texas Tech (10): Along with the rest of the Red Raiders, Stockton struggled against Arkansas with only seven yards rushing on six carries. But the week before against UTEP, he was outstanding with 135 yards rushing, including a 75-yard touchdown dash.

9. Corey Avery, RB, Kansas (8): While the rest of the Kansas offense did little, Avery was the lone bright spot in the loss at Duke. He led the Jayhawks with 87 yards rushing, after rushing for 91 the week before in his debut.

10. Jason Hall, S, Texas (NR): Hall had a sack and a couple of big hits against UCLA after entering the game in the second quarter. His aggression figures to warrant him more playing time after Texas returns from the open weekend.

On the radar: Tevin Madison, CB, Texas Tech; Colin Downing, P, Iowa State; Cameron Batson, PR/WR, Texas Tech; Matthew Boateng, CB, Kansas; Steven Parker II, Oklahoma
video

ESPN's Kevin Carter, Matt Millen and Brett McMurphy join national recruiting director Tom Luginbill to discuss the importance of the upcoming seasons for Texas' recruiting efforts, especially with in-state recruits.
David Ash's decision to retire was not unexpected but the former Texas Longhorns quarterback has received support from around the country, including the reigning NBA MVP.

Former Texas standout and current Oklahoma City Thunder star Kevin Durant, who won the 2013-14 NBA MVP award, took to Twitter to express his appreciation for Ash's contribution to the Longhorns.


Ash responded with a thank you of his own for his fellow Longhorn.

Ash gave all he could before walking away

September, 18, 2014
Sep 18
8:30
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AUSTIN, Texas -- A complicated career ended with an easy decision.

David Ash is giving up football, a choice far wiser than he probably appreciates, but one that is no doubt gut-wrenching. Texas' quarterback was right to hang it up after his bout with concussions over the past year. There should be no debate about that.

To let Ash, a 22-year-old with a long life ahead of him, continue to play would've been irresponsible. Texas has known that since Aug. 31, when he revealed to team doctors he was once again dealing with headaches and dizziness.

"There was no way we'd let him back out on the field," Texas coach Charlie Strong said, "because we were going to be concerned about his health."

They knew he was done, so Wednesday's announcement was not unexpected. What we don't know, unfortunately, is something Texas fans have pondered for years.

We'll never know how good Ash could've been. His career seemed forever on the cusp, a few great games away from something bigger. But he gave as much as he could.

When concussions derailed his junior season last year, he wasn't ready to walk away. Last month, Ash was asked about the people who told him to stop playing. He understood why they asked their questions.

[+] EnlargeTexas' David Ash
AP Photo/Eric GayDavid Ash suffered several hard hits on against North Texas in the Longhorns' first game. He revealed to team doctors he was once again dealing with headaches and dizziness the next day.
"'Why are you coming back to play? Why are you doing this? You can quit now. You did the best you could,'” Ash said. "I just can't do that.”

No, he needed another chance. One more game, one more season. He'd fought hard for 12 months to get back, and even harder to become the quarterback he knew he could be.

Ash fit the prototype at 6-foot-3 and 220 pounds with a strong arm and quick feet. He threw as pretty a ball as any Texas QB since Chris Simms, especially when you watched him practice. He was a deceptive runner, with dashes of 55, 49 and 47 yards on his résumé.

There were a few nights when he put it all together. He did it in Stillwater in 2012, leading Texas on a 75-yard, game-winning drive for a 41-36 win over Oklahoma State. Looking back, that was probably the finest game of his career.

He was exceptional against Texas Tech later that season, one week after being benched at Kansas, and his second-half performance in the Alamo Bowl to beat Oregon State inspired real hope about 2013. He threw, he scrambled, he yelled, he led. He was getting closer.

But there were struggles he couldn't overcome along the way. He never beat Oklahoma in two tries, both embarrassing losses. He was pulled in that near-loss at KU in 2012. He shouldn't have tried to play with broken ribs in a Thanksgiving loss to TCU.

But if the sum total of your evaluation of Ash is, "He stunk against OU,” you missed out on a lot. He went 15-7 as Texas' starter. For some reason, he was judged far more by the seven than by the 15.

But Mack Brown believed in Ash. He believed Texas could be great in 2013 if Ash was great. He thought Texas could win any game on its schedule if his quarterback played at the level he expected.

Ash's rocky career will, in some ways, be forever tied to the end of Brown's. While Robert Griffin III, Johnny Manziel and so many other fine quarterbacks from Texas thrived elsewhere, Ash was the guy Brown hitched his wagon to after the implosion of the Garrett Gilbert era. Had Ash not been lost for the season last year, perhaps Texas might not have a new head coach.

The public expectations, for that reason, were never going to be fair for Ash. Brown and Strong repeatedly asked him just to be a good quarterback, a distributor and manager, and not fret about being great.

His week-to-week demeanor as the leader of the Longhorns' offense, the focal point of this great fishbowl, rarely changed. He was quiet, unassuming country boy from Belton, Texas, early on, but always came off as calm and rather determined. He speaks frequently about his life being grounded in his faith.

"In my mind, I always knew I was going to play again,” Ash said in August. "I feel like this is where God has placed me, this is the talent he has given me, and whenever I work hard and I play hard, it pleases Him and gives Him glory.”

The year off from football humbled him in new ways. He came back from his concussion and foot injury with conviction. He'd never considered quitting, he said, and he wasn't going to look back.

Strong lauded his fall practices as "outstanding.” Ash knew he was still getting closer. When asked about being so close to that breakthrough in 2013 and then having it taken away, having to wait patiently for another season, he offered genuine perspective.

"I think you just be thankful for what you get," Ash said, "and this goes for any person in any situation. You look at situations and say, 'I'm a victim. Why me?' Or you can look at situations and say, 'Wow, I'm so thankful that I even got to do this much.' So attitude is everything in those kinds of situations.

"So right now, wow, I get another opportunity. That's amazing. That's awesome. Thank God for that. I didn't necessarily deserve that, to get another opportunity. Just got to make the most of it.”

Ash got another shot against North Texas on Aug. 30. He played as long as he could. When it was over, when the symptoms came back, he knew he could walk away without regret.

When he sat down with Strong on Wednesday to make his retirement official, he did so voluntarily. Ash is ready to move on, unburdened by expectation, off to find a new way to give glory. Soon enough, he'll realize playing quarterback has nothing to do with how good he can be.

Big 12 morning links

September, 18, 2014
Sep 18
8:00
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It's a big night in the "Little Apple."
  • Texas quarterback David Ash elected to give up football after struggling with concussion-related symptoms for the past year. Given the seriousness of head injuries, this was not a surprising decision. Max will have more on this later in the morning, but the move makes you wonder what could have been with Ash. He had moments of brilliance, notably in the 2012 Alamo Bowl win over Oregon State. That game seemed to be the turning point in Ash's career. As it turned out, Ash's career would basically be over not long into the following season.
  • Ash's retirement wasn't the only major Big 12 story of the day. West Virginia cornerback Daryl Worley turned himself into police after a warrant was issued for his arrest on a misdemeanor battery charge. Worley is accused of choking a woman and shoving her to the floor during a nightclub altercation hours after West Virginia's win over Maryland last weekend. This is a huge blow for the Mountaineers on and off the field. Worley was arguably West Virginia's best defensive player, and would have been matched up against Oklahoma WR Sterling Shepard this weekend. But Worley, who was one of the three players coach Dana Holgorsen took to Big 12 media days, was also viewed as one of the leaders of the team. Whenever a player of that stature is suspended indefinitely, the ripple effect in the locker room can be significant.
  • In case you forgot, there's also a pretty big game being played tonight. Auburn will be the highest-ranked nonconference team to visit Manhattan since second-ranked Penn State came to town 45 years ago. There are a bunch of good reads setting up this showdown. Coach Bill Snyder has a message for his fans, according to the Kansas City Star's Kellis Robinett. AL.com's Brandon Marcello has the scoop on Auburn QB Nick Marshall reuniting with Snyder. And the Chicago Sun-Times' Steve Greenberg has more on the intriguing coaching matchup between Gus Malzahn and Snyder. I arrived in Manhattan last night for this one, and can't wait for kickoff.
  • Oklahoma will debut its alternate uniforms this weekend at West Virginia, Bob Stoops revealed. As I detailed in this Take Two over the summer, I wasn't a fan of the Sooners going in this direction. It was my opinion that Oklahoma's iconic brand was above the uniform craze. But I have to admit, I'm curious to see what they'll look like in an actual game.
  • TCU coach Gary Patterson is doing everything he can to get his team's attention in an open week before the Horned Frogs play winless SMU next weekend. According to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram's Carlos Mendez, Patterson demoted both of his starting cornerbacks, senior Kevin White and redshirt freshman Ranthony Texada, for not playing up to Patterson's standard. It's understandable why Patterson is getting after his team. It's also understandable, with the open week and hapless SMU up next, why the Horned Frogs might be a bit sluggish in practice this week.

Timeline: Ash's yearlong concussion battle

September, 17, 2014
Sep 17
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AUSTIN, Texas -- Texas quarterback David Ash has elected to retire due to concussion-related symptoms, ending a 376-day saga that began with one hit in Provo, Utah, and ultimately led to the 22-game starter's decision that his playing days are over. The following is an updated timeline of how we got here.

Sept. 7, 2013: Ash exits a 40-21 loss to BYU late in the fourth quarter after suffering a concussion. He does not play against Ole Miss the following week.

Sept. 20: Texas announces Ash has been cleared by UT medical staff to start against Kansas State. He'd participated in his first practice since the concussion two days earlier after being symptom-free for at least 48 hours.

Sept. 21: Ash passes for 166 yards and guides Texas to a 17-7 halftime lead over K-State, then is held out for the second half. Team trainers evaluate him for concussion symptoms.

[+] EnlargeTexas' David Ash
AP Photo/Eric GayDavid Ash suffered several hard hits on Saturday against North Texas.
Nov. 16: Ash attends his first Texas football game since Kansas State, a home loss to Oklahoma State.

Nov. 25: Texas officially announces Ash is out for the season and will seek a medical redshirt. "Though he's made a lot of progress, we have not been able to clear him to return to competition," Texas trainer Kenny Boyd says in a statement. "Due to the duration of symptoms, we are now at a point that we all believe the best approach for him is to not return this season."

Jan. 18, 2014: Ash is cleared for offseason workouts and is expected to be a full participant in spring practice.

March 18: First day of spring practice. Ash returns to the practice field for the first time since September.

April 11: Ash is shut down for the final week of spring practice after suffering a "Jones fracture" in his left foot which requires surgery. Texas also announces Ash officially received a medical redshirt for missing 2013, giving him two remaining seasons of eligibility.

July 21: Texas announces Ash is fully cleared to participate in fall practice. A day later, Strong says at Big 12 media days Ash is his starting quarterback.

Aug. 4: First day of fall practice. Ash speaks to media for the first time since BYU. "A lot of people told me, 'You need to give it up, you need to quit.' Honestly, I never really thought about it," he says. "In my mind, I always knew I was going to play." He declines to discuss specifics about his concussion. When asked if he's ready to take his first hit, he declares: "Oh yeah, bring it on."

Aug. 25: During his Monday news conference, Strong refers to Ash as an "unbelievable quarterback who's had an unbelievable preseason camp." When asked again about taking his first hit in the season opener, Ash says, "I'm going to be OK. If I get hit, I'll be fine. I will be sliding a lot more this season, so you can count on that, and I'll be trying to protect myself and doing what's best for the team and taking care of my health during games so that I can last the whole season."

Aug. 30: Ash's first hit comes on the first play of Texas' second offensive drive. As he bends down to scoop up a fumbled snap, North Texas defensive end Jarrian Roberts hits Ash and his shoulder collides with the crown of Ash's helmet. Ash is slow to get up but does not report an injury to UT trainers. He takes at least five more hard hits during the 38-7 win, including three to his head or neck area.

Ash does not report any injuries or symptoms to team trainers during the game. A UT spokesperson says Ash spoke with trainers immediately after he came off the field from each drive.

After the game, Ash does not speak to reporters. OC Shawn Watson describes his performance as "sporadic" with some good moments. Strong is asked about the hits Ash took. "It's all within the flow of the game," he says. "I think the officials did a great job and the thing we have to do is just do a better job protecting. ... Sometimes we see it coming and you have to remember, you're going to get hit in this game."

Around 1:30 a.m. Sunday, after leaving the stadium, Ash informs the Texas staff he's experiencing headaches and dizziness and is brought in for further evaluation. He tells Strong he thinks the first hit, by Roberts, caused his symptoms.

Sept. 1: Strong announces Ash will not play against BYU and offers no timetable for his return. He's concerned about Ash's concussion history but insists the coaching staff was unaware of any in-game symptoms. "I'm not ever going to jeopardize injury," he says. "You can never, ever in this program jeopardize a young man's health to compete in a football game."

Sept. 6: Ash is able to attend Texas' home loss against BYU and watches from the sideline in a jersey and khaki shorts. He also travels for Texas' loss to UCLA at AT&T Stadium but did not suit up.

Sept. 17: Ash meets with Strong and decides to end his playing career. Strong says there is "no way" Texas coaches or trainers would've let Ash take the field again, but the quarterback made the call on retiring and will remain involved with the team this season.

Longhorns' David Ash won't return

September, 17, 2014
Sep 17
8:00
PM ET
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AUSTIN, Texas -- Texas Longhorns quarterback David Ash has elected to end his football career after struggling with concussion-related symptoms for the past year.

Coach Charlie Strong announced the junior quarterback's decision after practice Wednesday. Ash had started 22 games in his career with the Longhorns but was shut down on Sept. 1 after experiencing more symptoms.

"We just decided, because of his health -- that's the No. 1 concern for all of us -- that he's no longer going to play football," Strong said. "But he is going to be part of the team, because I told him I wanted him around the team, and that's what he deserves."

Ash suffered a concussion at BYU in September 2013 and played in just two games since then. He met with Strong on Wednesday and agreed it was in his best long-term interest to stop playing.

"The trainers and doctors had been working with him and, like I said, his health is our major concern," Strong said. "We sat down to talk and he said, 'Coach, this is what I'd like to do.'"

Strong said there was "no way" Texas coaches and trainers could allow Ash to continue playing considering his concussion history. But it was Ash's decision to officially end his playing career.

"It was a very tough call for him," Strong said. "He's very emotional. He's done a lot for this program, been a major part of this university."

Ash finished his career with 4,728 passing yards and 36 total touchdowns.

Sophomore Tyrone Swoopes has started Texas' past two games and will remain the starting quarterback. Strong said Ash will continue to work with Texas' quarterbacks this season.

Strong also announced Wednesday that starting defensive tackle Desmond Jackson


(Read full post)


SPONSORED HEADLINES

Longhorn Trio Share Experience with Concussions
In the wake of David Ash's concussion battle, Tre' Newton, Nolan Brewster and Kendall Thompson discuss their experiences with sustaining concussions and the subsequent decisions they made for their careers and individual health.
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