Big 12 morning links

March, 3, 2015
Mar 3
9:00
AM ET
Hilton Magic...
  • Iowa State is kicking off its spring drills this morning. Monday, coach Paul Rhoads met with the media to discuss his team. Among the topics was an update on defensive end Mitchell Meyer, who was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma in February. Rhoads said Meyer has had two chemotherapy treatments, and his spirits are high.
  • The Cyclones also released a depth chart Monday, with few surprises. Perhaps the most intriguing position battle this spring will be at running back, where Iowa State is replacing Aaron Wimberly, who graduated, and DeVondrick Nealy, who left the team. Upperclassman Tyler Brown is atop the two-deep at running back, but the back creating the most buzz is redshirt freshman Mike Warren. "Mike is a guy we believe is going to be a 200-pound-plus back, which is where we want to be with our backs -- and where we haven't been in the past," Rhoads said. The Des Moines Register's Tommy Birch has more notes from Rhoads' news conference, including the plan for wideout Quenton Bundrage, who is coming back from a season-ending knee injury.
  • The Waco Tribune-Herald's John Werner has a feature on Baylor quarterback Seth Russell, who is the favorite to succeed Bryce Petty. Assuming Russell does win the job, it will be interesting to see how Art and Kendal Briles tailor the offense to fit Russell's skill set. Russell isn't a track star the way Robert Griffin III was. But he's more athletic than Petty, with a 40-yard dash time of 4.48 seconds. The Bears could be running the quarterback more next season than they have in recent years. In other news, the Bears had an interesting visitor to their practice Monday.
  • TCU coach Gary Patterson discussed his philosophy for hiring assistants with the Fort Worth Star-Telegram's Carlos Mendez. "So many people are so easy to let people go, to lose knowledge of your program, how you recruit," Patterson said. "I've never been someone to believe you do that." It's little wonder that Patterson promoted four of his coaches last week, including Chad Glasgow and DeMontie Cross to co-defensive coordinators. Patterson hasn't been afraid to go out and hire assistants from the outside when the occasion has called for it (see: Doug Meacham and Sonny Cumbie). But his philosophy of promoting from within has fostered TCU's coveted continuity.
  • The Tulsa World's Bill Haisten acknowledged the rumor that Oklahoma State quarterback Daxx Garman is exploring a transfer. Haisten noted there will be no official update on Garman from Oklahoma State until the start of its spring practice next week. But a source told me over the weekend that at this point it's a "strong possibility" Garman transfers. Though he has already transferred before (from Arizona to Oklahoma State), it's hard to fault Garman for at least considering this option. Though Garman started eight games last season, Mason Rudolph has established himself as the quarterback of the future in Stillwater. The Cowboys also have J.W. Walsh coming back, which has Garman staring at the prospect of falling to third string on the depth chart.

Big 12 coaching carousel recap

March, 2, 2015
Mar 2
4:00
PM ET
The coaching carousel has finally slowed to a stop (well, almost), so let’s take a look back at who has gone and who is new in the Big 12 heading into spring practice. Iowa State and Kansas State made no changes, but every other program in the conference is breaking in at least two new assistants this fall. A rundown of all the changes:

Baylor

Out: Philip Montgomery (Tulsa), Brian Norwood (Tulsa)
In: Promoted Kendal Briles (OC) and Tate Wallis (WRs), hired Cris Dishman (DBs)

Art Briles is handing the reins of Baylor's offense to his son, Kendal Briles, who had previously coached the Bears’ prolific receivers. He earned the promotion after Montgomery landed the head coaching job at Tulsa and brought Norwood along as his co-defensive coordinator. The younger Briles will now oversee quarterbacks and provide his own innovative touches to playcalling. Dishman, a former Pro Bowler, will also bring fresh ideas to the mix as the safeties coach.

Kansas

In: Hired David Beaty (HC), Rob Likens (OC), Reggie Mitchell (RBs), Klint Kubiak (WRs), Zach Yenser (OL), Gary Hyman (ST/TEs), Kenny Perry (co-DC), Calvin Thibodeaux (DL), Kevin Kane (LBs)

Beaty has been well-received by Kansas fans so far and assembled a staff that will compete on the recruiting trail. Retaining Clint Bowen as co-DC and assistant head coach was his first move and certainly a popular one. Likens and Yenser come from Cal and will help install Beaty’s Air Raid-style vision for the offense. Perry, a high school coach just three years ago, was plucked from TCU’s staff. Bringing back strength coach Je'Ney Jackson, a former Mark Mangino assistant, was another savvy move.

Oklahoma

Out: Josh Heupel (Utah State), Jay Norvell (Texas), Jerry Montgomery (Green Bay Packers), Bobby Jack Wright (retired)
In: Hired Lincoln Riley (OC), Dennis Simmons (WRs), Diron Reynolds (DL), Kerry Cooks (DBs)

Bob Stoops hated having to part ways with Heupel and Norvell, but a change of direction for the offense was necessary. Riley, a Mike Leach disciple who got the Air Raid rolling at East Carolina, seems like a great fit and the perfect guy to deliver on Stoops’ new plan. Simmons, another former Leach assistant, should help with the transition. Cooks was Notre Dame’s ace recruiter in Texas, and Reynolds has more than a decade of NFL coaching experience.

Oklahoma State

Out: Bob Connelly (USC), Jemal Singleton (Arkansas), Van Malone (SMU), Eric Wolford (San Francisco 49ers), Jason Ray
In: Hired Dan Hammerschmidt, Marcus Arroyo, Greg Adkins, Jason McEndoo

Gundy completed his staff last week after enduring a lot of change, including one coach (Wolford) taking an NFL job a week after being hired. The specific roles for OSU’s four new hires have yet to be announced. Hammerschmidt is taking a job on the defense, and the other three will work with the offense. Arroyo was the Tampa Bay Bucs’ interim offensive coordinator last season. Adkins also comes from the pros. McEndoo was a longtime assistant at FCS Montana State.

TCU

Out: Dick Bumpas (retired), Kenny Perry (Kansas)
In: Promoted DeMontie Cross (co-DC), Chad Glasgow (co-DC), Paul Gonzales (CBs), Dan Sharp (DL)

Gary Patterson stuck to promoting from within this offseason, rewarding Cross and Glasgow when Bumpas stepped aside after 11 years as a Frog. Gonzales was promoted after three years as a grad assistant. Sharp, a member of the staff since 2001, was a director of player personnel last season, but has long overseen TCU’s special teams. Patterson says every member of his staff was offered jobs this offseason, and all but one stay put. This much continuity after a big season is critical.

Texas

Out: Chris Rumph (Florida), Les Koenning, Bruce Chambers
In: Hired Brick Haley (DL), Jay Norvell (WRs), Jeff Traylor (ST/TEs)

The abrupt departure of the well-liked Rumph was a surprise, but Charlie Strong found a respected replacement in LSU’s Haley. Bringing in Norvell from the Sooners was a surprise, too, and adds a little extra juice to the rivalry. We’ll see what influence, if any, the former OC has on Texas’ plans to go up-tempo offensively. Traylor, a successful Texas high school coach, gives the Longhorns a better presence in recruiting the valuable East Texas area.

Texas Tech

Out: John Scott Jr. (New York Jets)
In: Hired David Gibbs (DC), Zac Spavital (LBs)

Nobody forced more turnovers over the past two seasons (73) than Houston. That is one of the many reasons why Gibbs was a smart hire to overhaul the Red Raiders' defense. The eighth Texas Tech DC since 2007 should bring a bit more stability, and he also brought along Spavital from Houston. Mike Smith, the interim DC last year, was retained and will now coach the defensive line in addition to keeping his co-DC title.

West Virginia

Out: Tom Bradley (UCLA), Shannon Dawson (Kentucky)
In: Hired Bruce Tall (DL)

Dawson and Bradley left for good promotions, yet it’s hard to say West Virginia took a big hit as a staff this offseason. Dawson’s departure won’t change much, as Dana Holgorsen is still overseeing the offense as its playcaller. New GA hire Michael Burchett will help Holgorsen coach the QBs. Tall returns after a four-year stint as DC at FCS Charlotte. Holgorsen still has one more hire to make: special teams coach. Once they are on board, the Big 12 coaching carousel will officially (probably) come to a stop for 2015.
We're in the middle of junior day season with multiple schools hosting prospects last weekend and others set to host elite talent this weekend. Here's the latest on the recruiting trail:

BAYLOR
Total commits: 5
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 3
The latest: Baylor hosted several elite prospects over the weekend including Plano (Texas) East prospect Anthony Hines III, an elite Class of 2017 prospect who boasts offers from most of the Big 12 as well as LSU, Ohio State and others. Fellow Class of 2017 prospects Hezekiah Jones and Jeff Okudah, who was offered over the weekend, were also in Waco for BU’s junior day as Art Briles' program focuses on this recruiting cycle and beyond.

IOWA STATE
Total commits: 0
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 0
The latest: It’s a big week for the Cyclones with spring football set to kick off and junior day this weekend. ISU also sent out some offers last week including an offer to Allen (Texas) defensive end Levi Onwuzurike. The 6-foot-3, 230-pound prospect also boasts offers from Boston College and Illinois.

KANSAS
Total commits: 2
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 0
The latest: KU held a junior day over the weekend with Wildwood (Missouri) Lafayette offensive lineman Chase Behrndt among the visitors. The Jayhawks also offered Sachse (Texas) athlete Donovan Duvernay last week. His twin brother, Devin Duvernay, is the No. 12 player in the ESPN Junior 300 and already boasted a KU offer. The Jayhawks joined Boise State as teams who have offered Donovan.

KANSAS STATE
Total commits: 2
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 0
The latest: Edmond (Oklahoma) Santa Fe linebacker Calvin Bundage has emerged as one of the rising stars in the Big 12 region as he added an offer from the Wildcats. Iowa State, Kansas, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State, TCU, Texas Tech and Michigan are among the schools who have offered the Class of 2016 safety/linebacker hybrid.

OKLAHOMA
Total commits: 3
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 1
The latest: The Sooners could have a big weekend ahead with another junior day set for March 7. New Orleans (Louisiana) Easton linebacker Pernell Jefferson is among the recruits who are set to head to Norman, Oklahoma, this weekend. TCU and Texas Tech are among the other Big 12 teams who have offered Jefferson.

OKLAHOMA STATE
Total commits: 2
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 0
The latest: Oklahoma State didn’t see any reason to wait any longer before offering Class of 2018 offensive tackle Brey Walker. The Moore (Oklahoma) Southmoore prospect is 6-foot-6, 285 pounds and excelled on the gridiron and wrestling mat during his freshman season. He’s going to be a name to watch over the next few years.

TCU
Total commits: 8
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 3
The latest: TCU hopes to go into Arkansas to grab Little Rock (Arkansas) Robinson athlete T.J. Hammonds away from the Razorbacks. The Horned Frogs offered the 5-foot-11, 186-pound prospect this week and he could be a good fit on either side of the ball for Gary Patterson’s program.

TEXAS
Total commits: 4
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 3
The latest: Texas held a junior day over the weekend with several top prospects visiting Austin, Texas, despite the weather playing havoc with the travel plans of many prospects. The Longhorns offered multiple prospects last week including OU offensive line commitment Jean Delance along with running back Darius Anderson and cornerback Eric Cuffee.

TEXAS TECH
Total commits: 3
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 0
The latest: The Red Raiders looked to the East Coast for one of its latest offers with Washington (D.C.) Woodrow Wilson running back Abdul Adams boasting an offer from Kliff Kingsbury’s program. The No. 277 player in the ESPN Junior 300, Adams has a large offer list which includes OU and West Virginia.

WEST VIRGINIA
Total commits: 4
ESPN Junior 300 commits: 0
The latest: West Virginia sent out multiple offers last week with its March 15 junior day on the horizon. Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) Imhotep running back Tylick Raynor and Southfield (Michigan) running back Matthew Falcon are among the recruits who boasted offers from the Mountaineers.

Big 12 morning links

March, 2, 2015
Mar 2
9:00
AM ET
Haven't been watching "House of Cards." How's Season 3? Lemme know in the comments. If you need a quick break between episodes, some Monday morning links:
  • TCU got started on spring ball Sunday afternoon, which capped off a pretty good weekend for Cameron Echols-Luper. The speedy returner won gold in the long jump at the Big 12 indoor track and field championships this weekend, then made it back in time for his first practice. Echols-Luper is moving from receiver to cornerback this spring and I really wouldn't be surprised if he provides a spark there once he gets comfortable.
  • Texas Tech also opened spring practice on Sunday, and a defender to keep an eye on under new DC David Gibbs is Justis Nelson. According to Don Williams of the Lubbock Avalanche-Journal, Nelson will work at corner and safety this spring and Gibbs has high hopes for him. In fact, he thinks Nelson could've nabbed as many as eight interceptions last season. Tech has established its pre-spring depth chart, but it sounds like Gibbs will have his defensive backs cross-train at multiple spots for versatility and to present different looks. Good idea.
  • Iowa State has all sorts of question marks on defense this spring, and Bobby La Gesse of the Ames Tribune does a nice job here of breaking down the biggest concerns. First and foremost, the Cyclones' staff has to figure out how to get better up the middle. I'm not surprised there's optimism about juco import Desmond Tucker at defensive tackle -- they'll need him to be good right away. There are way too many unknowns when it comes to those linebackers, too.
  • Athlon has attempted to rank the rosters of the Big 12 based on recruiting data, with Texas coming in first place (and No. 9 in the nation) ahead of Oklahoma. They're the only two Big 12 programs that cracked Athlon's top 25. Baylor is 32nd in FBS, TCU is 35th and Kansas State is 56th. Clearly they're bad at recruiting, right? I'm reluctant to share this one because, frankly, I think using recruiting rankings to evaluate a team's roster years later is an exercise that promises to produce bogus results. But, hey, people like lists.
  • Lastly, I know this isn't a football link but it's still definitely worth a share. In this SC Featured piece, Texas women's basketball player Imani McGee-Stafford opens up about how slam poetry helped her overcome her past. It's a poignant piece about an athlete who has braved a lot and found an outlet to express her pain and inspire others. Give this video a watch today.
[+] EnlargeCardale Jones
Chuck Cook/USA TODAY SportsCan Cardale Jones parlay last season's run into the full-time starting QB job at Ohio State?

Defending national champion Ohio State might have too many quarterbacks.

Traditional heavyweights such as Florida, Michigan and Texas might not have enough.

As spring football practice opens around the country, many of the sport's best teams will start to sort out quarterback questions. Six of the teams that finished in the top 10 of the final Associated Press top 25 poll in 2014 -- Oregon, Alabama, Florida State, Baylor, Georgia and UCLA -- will have new quarterbacks this coming season.


(Read full post)


In today's Big 12 mailbag, we discuss coaching hires, QB battles, why I hate everyone and what Big 12 apparel I have in my closet.

On to the 'bag:
Trotter: Never underestimate the power of Bill Snyder's magic wand. That said, I don't see how K-State doesn't take a step back this year without Jake Waters, Tyler Lockett, Curry Sexton, B.J. Finney, Ryan Mueller and Jonathan Truman.

Trotter: It's funny to me when a particular fan base thinks I only pick on their team. I pick on everyone, when the occasion calls for it. All 10 Big 12 fan bases have gotten mad at me at one time or another. Just check my Twitter mentions sometime.

Trotter: Right now, I have them third in the league behind TCU and Baylor. The Cowboys really don't have any weaknesses on paper, and they boast an up-and-coming quarterback in Mason Rudolph, who was fabulous in three starts last year. The schedule also lines up for the Cowboys, who get TCU, Baylor and Oklahoma in Stillwater.

Trotter: Very solid hire. Adkins has been around the block, with stints coaching offensive line at Tennessee and Georgia. Our SEC guru Chris Low really liked the hire. Doug Marrone obviously thought a lot of Adkins to bring him along from Syracuse to the Bills. Mike Gundy could have done a lot worse.

Trotter: To me, it's a two-man race between William Crest and Skyler Howard. Paul Millard is a nice veteran to have around. David Sills is a solid prospect, and we'll see what Chris Chugunov can do. But Crest's year in the system gives him an edge over the freshmen. And Howard's game experience gives him an edge over everyone.

Trotter: Considering court-storming is probably going to get banned this year, I'd go with the former.

Trotter: For one, what the Lincoln Riley offense will look like. For two, who will emerge in the QB derby. There's plenty of intrigue in Norman this spring.

Trotter: Given that Trevor Knight, Baker Mayfield and Cody Thomas all have a bunch of experience, Hansen is a long shot. Not that those three can't be beaten out. But it's going to be hard for Hansen to shine when he's going to be getting fourth-team reps.

Trotter: Pretty business-as-usual hire. Patterson oversees the defense to a large degree, anyway. By promoting in-house, he keeps that continuity, which is an obvious positive. Patterson might be more involved than when Dick Bumpas was around. But the defense is going to be similar to what we've seen in Fort Worth.

Trotter: I actually have one article of Big 12 apparel in my closet -- a pair of West Virginia sweatpants my wife's family (who are rabid Mountaineers fans) got me at the most recent family reunion (which, by the way, was in West Virginia). They're too comfortable for me to get rid of. So everyone is just going to have to deal with that.
video

Charlie Strong sat down with Longhorn Network and discussed the impact of race relations on him and his career.
video

In recognition of Black History Month, Longhorn Network held a roundtable discussion featuring former Longhorn football players Vince Young, James Brown and Donnie Little.
Fully capitalizing on red-zone chances is a trait of championship teams.

Settling for field goals can cost a team a game. Worst yet, turning the ball over in the opponent's red zone can completely change momentum.

Here's a look at the Big 12's rankings in red-zone efficiency in conference games only during the past three years since TCU and West Virginia joined in 2012.

Red-zone points per drive

1. Kansas State, 5.14: The Wildcats' 64.3 red-zone touchdown percentage is the best in the Big 12. Five Wildcats (John Hubert, Collin Klein, Charles Jones, Jake Waters, Daniel Sams) rushed for at least seven red-zone touchdowns.

2. Oklahoma, 5.02: The Sooners average 3.1 yards per carry in the red zone, ranking second in the Big 12. Samaje Perine rushed for 240 yards and 14 touchdowns on 56 red-zone carries in 2014 as he erased any need for a special short yardage package for the Sooners.

3. Baylor, 4.94: The Bears have the unique ability to run defenses ragged with their speed and explosiveness yet buckle down with physical offense when needed. Baylor's 75 red-zone rushing touchdowns are the Big 12's best during this span.

4 (tied). Texas, 4.92: The Longhorns convert 50.7 percent of third-down conversions in the red zone, second in the conference but Texas' 282 total plays and 106 total drives rank eighth in the Big 12 -- a sign UT doesn't sustain long scoring drives on a consistent basis.

4 (tied). Oklahoma State, 4.92: The Cowboys scored on 85.3 percent of their red-zone drives, but a 34.8 third-down conversion rate ranked last in the Big 12. Some of OSU's offensive struggles in recent years followed them into the red zone at times.

6. Iowa State, 4.90: The Cyclones' 3.79 yards per play in the red zone sits atop the Big 12 but their 236 total red-zone plays is ninth in the conference. Paul Rhoads' team was decent when it got inside the 20-yard line but a combination of turnovers and inefficiency slowed ISU down.

7. Texas Tech, 4.79: The Red Raiders' eight red-zone turnovers helped push them down the rankings despite Tech recording a conference-best 61.9 completion percentage inside the red zone.

8. West Virginia, 4.76: The Mountaineers had a 29 touchdown-to-interception ratio in the red zone with one interception in 115 red zone attempts but their 34.9 third-down conversion percentage resulted a poor red-zone touchdown percentage (58.9 percent, eighth in Big 12).

9. TCU, 4.59: The Horned Frogs nine red-zone turnovers were the worst in the Big 12, offsetting TCU's 55.9 completion percentage and 4.88 yards per pass attempt in the red zone, which ranked second in the Big 12 in both categories.

10. Kansas, 3.72: The Jayhawks rank last in pretty much every category including yards per play (2.6), total plays (202) and yards per carry (2.14). Kansas' bad offense followed them any time they ventured within the red zone.

Red-zone points per drive allowed

1. TCU, 4.25: Gary Patterson's program sits atop the Big 12 in total plays (229), yards per play (2.85) and yards per carry (2.39) in the red zone.

2. Oklahoma State, 4.43: The Cowboys allowed 1.98 yards per carry in the red zone and nine red-zone sacks, ranking first in the Big 12, and tied TCU for first at 2.85 yards per play.

3 (tied). Kansas State, 4.64: The Wildcats were terrific on third down, allowing 35.8 percent of conversion attempts to be converted.

3 (tied). Kansas, 4.64: Kansas saw the most total plays (369) yet ranked third behind OSU and TCU in yards per play (3.08). The Jayhawks' defense also added nine red-zone turnovers forced, which is second in the conference.

5. Texas, 4.66: The Longhorns' 8.1 sack percentage in the red zone led the conference, but 33.2 percent of opponents' plays resulted in five yards or more, the worst percentage in the Big 12. It gave the defense a boom-or-bust type of feel.

6. West Virginia, 4.75: The Mountaineers faced the second-highest number of red-zone plays (364) and ranked fourth in yards per play allowed (3.17) yet allowed opponents to convert 50.6 of third-down attempts.

7. Iowa State, 4.82: The Cyclones have forced the most red-zone turnovers in the Big 12 (11) yet have allowed 80 red-zone touchdowns, tied with Kansas for eighth.

8. Oklahoma, 5.06: The Sooners' inability to force turnovers in the red zone is part of the problem as OU forced one red-zone mistake in three seasons.

9. Baylor, 5.39: Baylor's 3.58 yards per play ranked ninth in the conference and didn't record a red-zone sack in three seasons.

10. Texas Tech, 5.42: The Red Raiders allowed a 57.1 third-down conversion rate, worst in the Big 12. By comparison, TCU's 20 third-down conversion rate was the Big 12's best.
video
If you asked Mike Leach, odds are he'd probably tell you his job at Washington State is a wee bit more difficult than he might have expected when he was first hired. And it won't be long before Wake Forest fans start to realize just how remarkable Jim Grobe's tenure was in Winston-Salem.

For a variety of reasons -- namely money, scheduling, academics, facilities and recruiting -- the path to the College Football Playoff is simply easier for some Power 5 coaches and nearly impossible for others. Here's a look at the top-10 easiest coaching paths to the playoff, starting with the easiest, and the 10 most difficult coaching jobs:

EASIEST COACHING PATHS TO THE PLAYOFF

1. Texas
One of the wealthiest, most visible brand-name programs in the country wants for nothing -- and unlike Florida State, it doesn't have to navigate through a conference title game. Right now it's in a catch-22 situation. Texas has to win to own the state in recruiting again, but it has to get the recruits to win.

2. Florida State
The Noles can own and have owned the ACC, with Clemson being their most difficult hurdle. The combination of first-class facilities, in-state recruiting and available salary money makes this one of the most desirable jobs for a coach aspiring to reach the playoff.

3. Ohio State
The East Division isn't easy, but it's manageable, and the Big 33 recruiting turf and financial security -- along with the incredible support and facilities -- puts this brand-name program on the fast track to the playoff. It's easy to sell the program that has been the flagship of the conference for more than a decade.

4. Oklahoma
With no conference title game to trip over, the Sooners have one of the easiest paths to the playoff, not to mention the facilities and financial resources to recruit players and pay coaches.

5. Clemson
It's on par with the SEC as far as recruiting and facilities, but has an easier league to navigate. The program has the resources and salaries needed to recruit and coach a top-four team.

6. USC
When this storied program is at full strength -- without scholarship limitations and postseason penalties -- there's nothing in the way of a top-four ranking. Its pipeline of players to the NFL is proof.

7. Notre Dame
The Irish control their strength of schedule and can now sell an ACC bowl lineup to recruits.

8. Georgia
The Bulldogs have owned the state, and while Florida has to contend with FSU (and dreadful facilities), Georgia has had the upper hand in the series against Georgia Tech. Everything is in place for a title run.

9. Alabama
The program oozes money and tradition, luring the best players in the country. It's ranked low because of a grueling SEC West schedule and conference title game to navigate through.

10. LSU
Much like Alabama, the Tigers are the epitome of SEC success, able to cherry-pick recruits and pay for the best coaches in the country. The biggest obstacle is LSU's own conference schedule.

MOST DIFFICULT COACHING PATHS TO THE PLAYOFF

1. Vanderbilt
There's no school in the country with more of an uphill battle to the playoff than Vandy. The stringent academic requirements are a big reason the program can't recruit the elite athletes necessary to compete with the top teams in the league -- which is why it never will.

2. Wake Forest
The smallest school in the BCS had one historic Orange Bowl run, but that was an anomaly, not the trend. It's not the best program in the state, let alone the Atlantic Division.

3. Washington State
The Cougs are the Pac-12's most isolated, rural program, making recruiting difficult -- the heart of Wazzu's troubles over the past 11 straight losing seasons. It also doesn't help to be looking up at Oregon in the North Division.

4. Colorado
After nine straight losing seasons, the Buffs have faded into irrelevance, and they're competing in a South Division that's on the upswing, led by USC and Arizona. The coaching turnover, subpar recruiting and lack of investment in facilities have made the past decade a disaster.

5. Indiana
The Hoosiers have been stuck in a rut of mediocrity and are outpaced when it comes to facilities and coaching hires. Equally as problematic is IU's place in the East Division, alongside heavyweights Ohio State and Michigan State.

6. Kansas
The program has always been overshadowed by its hoops counterpart and hasn't been relevant in football since its 2007 Orange Bowl appearance.

7. Purdue
The fans have lost interest -- and apparently so have the recruits -- but the program also hasn't had the financial backing it needs to stay on pace with the rest of the conference.

8. Iowa State
Not only is there not much in-state talent, but the Cyclones have to share it with rival Iowa.

9. Kentucky
The program has made a renewed financial commitment recently and has demonstrated that bowl eligibility is a reality, but Kentucky has to win the SEC East before it can be taken seriously as a playoff contender.

10. Syracuse
There's a sense of apathy surrounding the program, which is stuck in the ACC's stronger Atlantic Division with FSU, Clemson and Louisville. There's not enough depth on Syracuse's roster to overcome injuries -- or the schedule.
Success on third downs can decide games.

Coaches focus on it, quarterbacks can become stars and defenders can become feared by stepping up to another level on those key moments. Here's a look at the Big 12's third-down conversion rate rankings, offensively and defensively, in Big 12 games during the three seasons since TCU and West Virginia joined the conference in 2012.

Third-down conversion rate
  1. Kansas State, 47.1 percent
  2. Baylor, 45.5 percent
  3. Oklahoma, 44.4 percent
  4. Texas, 42 percent
  5. Texas Tech, 41.7 percent
  6. West Virginia, 39.6 percent
  7. Iowa State, 36.9 percent
  8. TCU, 35.5 percent
  9. Oklahoma State, 35.3 percent
  10. Kansas, 30.8 percent
Third-down conversion rate allowed
  1. TCU, 31.2 percent
  2. Texas, 36.6 percent
  3. Oklahoma State, 38.5 percent
  4. West Virginia, 39.6 percent
  5. Oklahoma, 40 percent
  6. Kansas State, 41.2 percent
  7. Texas Tech, 42.5 percent
  8. Iowa State, 42.5 percent
  9. Kansas, 42.7 percent
  10. Baylor, 42.9 percent

Here are some team-by-team thoughts:

Baylor: Clearly the Bears offense overcomes the Bears defensive struggles on third down. The Bears offense had 68 drives without a first down out of 291 drives in the past three seasons. Good quarterback play from Bryce Petty and Nick Florence have played a key role as well as a solid running game that has picked up 90 first downs on the ground, best in the Big 12.

Iowa State: Ranking in the bottom half in both categories is not a good look for Paul Rhoads program. Limited production at the quarterback position and 14 third-down sacks from the defense have played a major role as well as injuries to key players like Quenton Bundrage in 2014 and Tom Farniok in 2013 have made life a lot harder on the Cyclones.

Kansas: The only team to rank in the bottom two in both categories, it's easy to see why David Beaty is taking charge in Lawrence, Kansas. It's somewhat surprising to see the Jayhawk defense so far down the list but KU had 13 third-down sacks during this span. And the quarterback position has been a major problem at KU since Todd Reesing left in 2009.

Kansas State: Yet again the Wildcats efficient offense leads the Big 12 in a key category. Strong quarterback play from Collin Klein and Jake Waters along with receiver Tyler Lockett made KSU very difficult to stop. To see Bill Snyder's team in the bottom half of the conference in conversion allowed rate is a surprise but the Wildcats have a hard time getting three-and-outs. KSU's 17.8 three-and-out percentage on defense is only better than KU's 17.7.

Oklahoma: The Sooners offense has been good on third down despite some of its recent struggles while the defense has been very average. Offensively, OU has done a good job of getting its playmakers, namely Jalen Saunders and Sterling Shepard, involved on third-down plays. Defensively, the Sooners have talented players, like Eric Striker, yet sit middle of the road in third down defense.

Oklahoma State: Seeing the Cowboys near the bottom on the list in offensive conversion rate will make Cowboy fans long for the days of Brandon Weeden and Justin Blackmon. OSU's defense has been consistently good on third down and its third-down production was one of the reasons for the Cowboys recent Big 12 title contention. OSU's offense will need to be a lot better if the Pokes hope to surprise in 2015.

Texas: UT's 37 sacks is one key reason the Longhorns are among the Big 12's top third-down defenses. The surprise is the Longhorns offense sitting in the top half of the conference, ahead of Texas Tech, West Virginia and Oklahoma State, who have generally put together more productive offenses. It's a sign UT's offense has had its moments of offensive precision even if the bad moments are the most memorable.

Texas Tech: The Red Raiders haven't been great on third down but they haven't been horrible either. Improving the turnover margin is priority No. 1 for Kliff Kingsbury as the offense turns the ball over and the defense doesn't take the ball away. Once that is handled, then Tech can work on improving third down conversion rates.

TCU: The Horned Frogs defense is stellar in nearly every category, ranking first in the Big 12 in yards per play allowed (4.62) and yards per carry allowed (2.13) on third down. Its offense was terrible on third down before the 2014 season, when it converted 42.9 percent on its third down attempts. TCU could end up in the top third of the conference in both categories in 2015 unless Gary Patterson's program takes a step backward this fall.

West Virginia: The Mountaineers haven't been particularly good on either side of the ball. WVU's struggles to stop the pass on defense -- 13.63 yards per completion on third down -- have hampered WVU's ability to get off the field. On offense, uneven quarterback play after Geno Smith's departure doomed the Mountaineers to finish in the middle of the pack.
It is an important spring for several players in the Big 12.

Some are fighting to keep their jobs, others are trying not to be forgotten and others have to fight off lauded Class of 2015 recruits. Here's a look at several Big 12 players who have plenty to gain during spring football.

Chris Johnson, QB, Baylor: With Seth Russell as the clear favorite to replace Bryce Petty as the starting quarterback, Johnson needs a strong spring to ensure the competition continues into the fall. He’ll also need to hold off highly regarded true freshman Jarrett Stidham.

Vernell Trent, DT, Iowa State: Trent had a decent redshirt freshman season, starting three games and finishing with 10 tackles in 2014. But ISU signed a pair of defensive tackles in the Class of 2015 with an eye on Demond Tucker and Bobby Leath becoming immediate impact performers. A good spring would help Trent secure a spot in the Cyclones’ defense.

[+] EnlargeMontell Cozart
Grant Halverson/Getty ImagesMontell Cozart must impress the new Kansas coaching staff this spring.
Montell Cozart, QB, Kansas: The junior went from unquestioned starting quarterback to afterthought in a span of a few months. Former coach Charlie Weis anointed Cozart to be the Jayhawks' quarterback of the future, but he faltered and eventually was replaced by Michael Cummings in 2014. If Cozart has any hope making a major impact during his Jayhawks career, he needs to impress the new coaching staff this spring.

Judah Jones, WR, Kansas State: The Wildcats are hoping to replace the playmaking skills of Tyler Lockett. One player isn’t going to do it, but Jones has the upside to become a key player in KSU’s offense while also making an impact on special teams. KSU has several other options at receiver, so Jones needs to rise above the competition if he hopes to separate himself this spring.

Trevor Knight, QB, Oklahoma: The junior has started 15 games during the past two seasons but faces stern competition to keep his starting spot with Texas Tech transfer Baker Mayfield becoming eligible in the fall. As Lincoln Riley brings his version of the Air Raid to OU, many assume Mayfield is the best bet to trigger the attack. Knight can use the spring to remind everyone of his unique physical gifts.

Marcell Ateman, WR, Oklahoma State: It’s time for Ateman to step up and separate himself at the receiver spot. At 6-foot-4 and 210 pounds, he brings size, speed and ball skills that are tough to duplicate, but he doesn’t dominate the way he should. With plenty of competition at the position, he needs to show he is ready to match his All-Big 12 talent with All-Big 12 production.

Daje Johnson, WR, Texas: When he touches the ball, Johnson looks like the dynamic playmaker the Longhorns have longed for during the past few seasons, but he constantly takes himself out of the equation by making bad decisions off the field. This spring is the opportunity for him to show he has the focus needed to make his final season on the 40 acres a breakout year.

Foster Sawyer and Grayson Muehlstein, QBs, TCU: The battle to back up Trevone Boykin should be interesting, so the spring gives Sawyer and Muehlstein the chance to lay claim to the No. 2 spot. Both quarterbacks should get plenty of chances to impress and the winner of the backup quarterback derby could set himself up to take over in 2016.

Davis Webb, QB, Texas Tech: A strong finish to the 2014 season by Patrick Mahomes has resulted in Webb being overlooked in many ways, but a healthy Webb was productive during his first two seasons in Kliff Kingsbury's program. The job is open heading into spring and Webb can make sure the quarterback battle in Lubbock is one of the most interesting aspects of Big 12 football in the spring.

Daikiel Shorts, WR, West Virginia: The Mountaineers need to fill the void left by Kevin White and Mario Alford. Shorts has been a contributor to the WVU offense since his true freshman season but hasn’t really developed into a game-changing target. This spring will give him the chance to show he can be a primary target for Dana Holgorsen's team.

Ranking the Big 12 coaching jobs

February, 25, 2015
Feb 25
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This week, ESPN.com ranked the best Power 5 coaching jobs in college football, No. 1 through 65. Below is how we rank the jobs in the Big 12:

1. Texas
The Longhorns have unlimited financial resources with a massive donor base. They are located in the middle of one of the country's pre-eminent recruiting hotbeds, too.

2. Oklahoma
The Sooners have one of the great traditions in college football, a recruiting pipeline into Texas and a supportive administration.

3. Oklahoma State
Thanks to Boone Pickens, Oklahoma State boasts facilities that take a backseat to no one. Over the past 10 years, few teams have won more than the Cowboys, either.

4. Baylor
This job would have ranked near the bottom not long ago. But Art Briles has whipped Baylor into a powerhouse. The Bears have a new stadium, a budding fan base and a brand that seems to be resonating with young recruits.

5. TCU
Facilities and conference used to be impediments for the Horned Frogs. Not anymore. TCU has a newly renovated stadium and state-of-the-art facilities, including an air-conditioned practice facility. TCU's proximity to the Metroplex makes it an attractive recruiting destination, too.

6. Texas Tech
Unlike West Virginia, Kansas State, Iowa State and Kansas, the Red Raiders are located in the Lone Star State, which gives them a proximity advantage in recruiting. Texas Tech also has rabid fans and a strong donor base in the Midland/Odessa area, which is pumping money into the stadium renovation.

7. West Virginia
The Mountaineers have severe recruiting challenges, with the lack of in-state talent. Still, this is the equivalent of a pro team in the state, and it has the backing necessary to win.

8. Kansas State
Nobody does more with less than Bill Snyder. Manhattan has never been a recruiting destination. But the Wildcats have passionate fans (as the court rushing in basketball the other night demonstrated) who make Bill Snyder Family Stadium a tough place to play. The Wildcats also have been making impressive facility upgrades, most recently to the Vanier Football Complex.

9. Iowa State
The Cyclones have obstacles with a small in-state recruiting pool they also have to share with Iowa. The elimination of the Big 12 North hurt Iowa State as well. But the Cyclones have something Kansas does not -- and that's a fan base committed to football.

10. Kansas
Only eight years ago, Mark Mangino took Kansas to the Orange Bowl. It seems even more amazing now. The Jayhawks are behind the rest of the league in every area, from attendance to facilities.

Five programs in need of a 2016 QB 

February, 25, 2015
Feb 25
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video
Quarterbacks are committing earlier and earlier in the recruiting process. With 16 of the 27 signal-callers in the ESPN Junior 300 already having given verbal pledges, there is increased pressure to get a top quarterback in the fold early. While some programs are set in 2016 or for the future at the vital position, several programs face the task of having to sign a potential difference maker at the position in the 2016 class.

Here are five programs that must sign a difference maker in 2016, and some of those are well on the way.

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