Normal soreness for Romo at halfway mark

October, 31, 2013
10/31/13
5:00
PM ET
IRVING, Texas -- Dallas Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo is not on the injury report, but he admitted to some soreness through eight games this season.

Romo had surgery in the offseason to remove a cyst from his back and missed the entire offseason program, organized team activities and minicamp but said it feels fine.

Romo
“Just bruises throughout the season, there are no back issues or anything like that,” Romo said. “You end up getting to the midpoint of the season, your shoulders are tight, all the legs, all that stuff, you’ve got to keep grinding away, keep getting better, and keep staying in the weight room and doing all that good stuff.”

In last week’s loss to the Detroit Lions, Romo was slow to get up after defensive end Ezekiel Ansah rolled into him on a 2-yard scramble on the second snap of the game. On the fifth snap in the game, Lions defensive tackle Nick Fairley hammered Romo after he let loose of a pass and later in the first quarter Fairley decked Romo from behind after a throw.

Romo completed just 14 of 30 passes for 206 yards. The 46.7 completion percentage was the third-worst of his career in games in which he has started and finished.

After putting up at least 318 yards on offense in the first five weeks, the Cowboys have had less than 300 yards in two of the last three games. They have converted just 13 of their last 41 third-down opportunities. Romo has completed only 56 percent of his passes.

“If you look at the season as a whole you’re going to have games that are more difficult. I think we’ve had two road games, that’s a part of it,” Romo said. “They’ve created some good pressure up front. I’ve thrown away more balls the last two games than I had previously maybe in four or five. That’s trying to stay ahead of the chains and things like that. The other part is just executing. We’ve just got to be better. It all comes into play.”

Todd Archer

ESPN Dallas Cowboys reporter

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