Cowboys: Bullying not an issue for us

November, 5, 2013
11/05/13
10:00
AM ET
IRVING, Texas -- Like a lot of teams, the Dallas Cowboys have their rookies sing during training camp. During the season, the rookies are responsible for picking up food before the team’s charter flights. And there are also offensive and defensive meals that are split between all the rookies.

When apprised of alleged events with the Miami Dolphins, Richie Incognito and Jonathan Martin, Cowboys rookie running back Joseph Randle was somewhat taken back.

“I can imagine things like that happen,” Randle said, "but we don’t really have that problem here.”

Coach Jason Garrett did not know the specifics of what happened between Incognito and Martin, but said the Cowboys have resources in place that players can use for any situation that arises.

“There’s some things that have happened in football for a long, long time,” Garrett said. “Rookies singing at dinner, rookies carrying shoulder pads, rookies buying fried chicken as you go to the airplane, all that stuff. That’s been around forever and that’s part of the process and part of what this league has been about for a long, long time. Hopefully it’s always done in a way where it’s developing team camaraderie and team chemistry and it’s good for your team. If it comes close to crossing the line, it certainly has to be addressed. I haven’t seen it like that in my career as a player, as a coach. You try to keep your eye on any of those kinds of things but I haven’t really seen it being an issue in the past.”

Brandon Carr has not seen an issue with bullying or hazing in his time with the Cowboys or Kansas City Chiefs.

“I just know in locker rooms I’ve been in it’s been in good fashion, just simple things just a do-boy, go do this, go do that, jokes and things like that,” Carr said. “Nothing serious or personal or attacking anything outside of football. Just a rites of passage what you go through … But I just know you don’t want that type of drama in your locker room between any players or one player being an outcast because that can spread to on the field and he probably has people supporting him in his corner that’s in the locker room and you don’t want that type of commotion in the locker room.”

Todd Archer

ESPN Dallas Cowboys reporter

SPONSORED HEADLINES

Comments

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, photo & other personal information you make public on Facebook will appear with your comment, and may be used on ESPN's media platforms. Learn more.


Insider