Dallas Colleges: Big 12-QA-110212

Big 12 media days live: Day 2

July, 22, 2014
Jul 22
9:40
AM CT
The Big 12 media days continue on Tuesday in Dallas, as Oklahoma's Bob Stoops and new Texas coach Charlie Strong each take the stage. Keep this page open throughout the day's proceedings as we bring you the latest from our reporters, who will cover all 10 teams at the event.

Friday Q&A: Texas Tech safety Cody Davis

November, 2, 2012
11/02/12
4:37
PM CT
Cody Davis has been one of the biggest pieces of Texas Tech's defensive renaissance this season, leading the Big 12 in solo tackles, with 57. He's broken up four passes and returned one of his three interceptions for a score, but he's made a big impact off the field, too. His blog, "Student of the Game" has made him of the league's most outspoken players, too, leading the way for the Red Raiders, who at 6-2 have already surpassed last season's win total.

He took some time out to talk with ESPN.com this week.

[+] EnlargeCody Davis
Jerome Miron/US PresswireSafety Cody Davis has been a reliable performer for Texas Tech this season.
Author's note: Portions of this interview were edited for length.

How would you describe your season so far?

It's been a great season so far. We've hit some rough bumps, definitely wanted to avoid some of the losses, kind of just shot ourselves in the foot those two games, but we're a much-improved team from last year,and we just want to keep improving as the year goes on.

You're up for the Campbell Trophy, also known as the Academic Heisman. What would winning that mean to you?

I'm really just truly honored to be able to be a part of that scholar-athlete class. There's definitely some great players going, and I just have to give credit to God and Texas Tech and family and friends for putting me in opportunities to get that award. Winning it would just be the icing on the cake, and a chance to get some recognition for all the hard work you put in as a student athlete.

What are you looking forward to most about that trip to New York as a member of the National Football Foundation's National Scholar-Athlete Class?

There's a lot to look forward to. The players that are going to be there, meeting some of them. The National Football Foundation -- I talked to (former Ohio State running back and 1995 Heisman Trophy winner) Eddie George this morning on XM Radio, so meeting some of those guys will be cool. Being in New York, too. I've never been before, so it'll be an exciting time.

You made some headlines with your blog post earlier this year that featured some frank reviews of the West Virginia players. What kind of response did you get from Tech fans and opposing fans for that?

It was a mixed response, as you'd probably figure. Most of it was positive, I think. A little misunderstanding on exactly what I was saying. I tried to clear that up, but it was mostly positive or neutral.

So what was your main message about that?

I was just saying the way they played was a little cocky and arrogant, just on the field and on film. I've never quite played against any team that was that ... let's just say "flamboyant" on the field as they are. Sometimes it can be a positive and sometimes it can be a negative, so I really wasn't trying to say anything too bad about 'em, but sometimes that can be good and sometimes that can be bad.

I remember another Texas Tech player, Baron Batch, had a blog that got pretty popular during his senior year. Where did your idea to start this [come from], and how have coaches responded to it?

Really, I've just been thinking about it the last two years, I guess. Just giving the players' perspective of things. You see all over the media what the team is doing and stuff, but a lot of people don't know how much time and effort is put in as a student athlete, and I really just wanted to give that perspective to the fans and an alternate source for information.

When you look at that student-athlete experience, what do you think is the biggest thing fans don't realize about you guys' lives?

I think the time and effort. It's a business these days, and it's kind of a job being a student-athlete. We're held to higher standards than most students and as well we should be, but just the time and effort and what goes into being a student-athlete and being successful on the field as well as in the classroom.

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