Hospital visits change Cowboys' perspective

December, 16, 2013
12/16/13
1:30
PM ET
DALLAS -- Less than 12 hours after the Dallas Cowboys suffered their worst loss of the season – a 37-36 defeat to the Green Bay Packers -- the players visited several local hospitals to meet with sick children.

Before the 19 players could interact with the kids, Children’s Medical Center CEO and President Chris Durovich offered a message.

“I think you’ll find these kids will brighten your week,” he said.

Durovich was right. Players and cheerleaders signed autographs and took pictures with boys and girls and their families. Tony Romo and Jason Witten met with a girl that Romo had previous contact with after they beat the New York Giants last month.

“I just think anytime you can see children smile, it warms your day,” Romo said. “A lot of these kids are in tough situations and are going through some tough things. Being a dad, you just feel for them and their parents and families and you pray for them. Anytime you can brighten their day at all, it’s a great thing for everybody, especially for us. We feel that.”

Witten has made hospital visits every year since joining the Cowboys in 2003. The pain he felt after the loss to the Packers does not compare.

“I think when you’re able to step back, it’s amazing to see,” Witten said. “I don’t know that it eases the pain of football but you’re able to look at real life from this perspective. I’m always amazed at the courage and toughness that these kids and families are able to show being in this situation in this time of their lives.”

Sean Lee is unable to play because of a neck injury, but he called seeing the children an inspiration.

“For me there’s been a lot of situations where I’ve been down, been frustrated because of not being able to be on the football field,” Lee said. “You can only be so negative because you understand when it comes to real life and problems, there’s a lot worse things that could happen than not being able to play football.”

Todd Archer

ESPN Dallas Cowboys reporter

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