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Tuesday, September 17, 2013
Jerry: No problem with screen pass

By Calvin Watkins

IRVING, Texas -- It's become the most talked about screen pass of the week: Quarterback Tony Romo bypasses one-on-one coverage with wide receiver Dez Bryant to throw a screen pass at the 12-yard line to rookie wideout Terrance Williams.

Sunday's game between the Dallas Cowboys and Kansas City Chiefs had many questions, but the third-quarter pass from Romo to Williams, ending in a 3-yard loss on third down, received much analysis.

Cowboys owner/general manager Jerry Jones said on his twice-weekly radio show Tuesday he had no problem with the play call.

"I know on any given play, a quarterback usually has many as three places to go with the ball," Jones said on KRLD-FM. Jones added it's easy to second-guess the decision of Romo throwing to Williams after watching the play again on game tape.

"That's the discretion of the quarterback to where the ball goes," Jones said later. "That was a call, a screen play, I don't have any problems with that. We were in trouble there getting into the end zone as it was. I don't take issues [with the play], we were in hurry-up situation there, too; all that I think contributes to it. The real problem was we made two mistakes when we got down there."

On the play, Bryant is waving his arms signaling he's got one-on-one coverage with Brandon Flowers and the Cowboys needed to exploit it. But Romo doesn't see him and goes to Williams instead. And while there were some blocking issues on the play, it was still a questionable decision.

The two mistakes Jones is talking about is Chiefs nose tackle Dontari Poe slipping through two blockers for a sack on first-and-goal from the 5 and left guard Ronald Leary's false-start penalty on a third-and-goal from the 4, which eventually set up the pass to Williams.

After the pass play, kicker Dan Bailey made a 30-yard field goal to increase the Cowboys' lead to 13-7 with seven minutes left in the third.