Dallas Cowboys: vinny testaverde

Like '07, Cowboys affirm Romo love

May, 9, 2014
May 9
2:45
PM ET
IRVING, Texas -- The Dallas Cowboys reaffirmed their love of QB Tony Romo on Thursday night when they passed on selecting Johnny Manziel in the 2014 NFL draft.

In 2007, they made a very similar move.

Romo
Back then, there were questions about Romo even after he took the NFL by storm and lifted the Cowboys to the playoffs in 2006.

Was he truly a franchise quarterback? Would a new coaching staff see him the same way the previous coaching staff saw him? Would there be any aftereffects from the bobbled snap in the playoff loss to the Seattle Seahawks?

The Cowboys had searched forever, it seemed, for Troy Aikman’s successor. They tried Quincy Carter. They tried baseball players, such as Chad Hutchinson and Drew Henson. They tried veterans, such as Vinny Testaverde and Drew Bledsoe.

In 10 games, Romo threw for 2,903 yards with 19 touchdowns and 13 interceptions. He went to the Pro Bowl.

He was also in the final year of his contract. Would the Cowboys make him a mega-offer with such a short track record?

Staring at the Cowboys as they were about make the 22nd pick in the '07 draft was Notre Dame quarterback Brady Quinn. Nobody expected him to be there. He was the Cowboys’ highest-rated quarterback. Forgetting what we know now, he had the stamp of approval from Charlie Weis, a coach who worked with Tom Brady. Quinn put up some strong numbers.

On the clock, the Cowboys traded out of the first round when they secured the Browns' second-round choice in 2007 and their first-rounder in 2008. Eventually they moved back into the first round in a trade with the Philadelphia Eagles to take Anthony Spencer with the 26th pick.

The Cowboys affirmed their love for Romo. Seven games into the 2007 season, they signed him to a six-year, $67.5 million deal that included $30 million guaranteed.

About 14 months ago, the Cowboys reaffirmed their love for Romo with a six-year, $108 million extension that included $55 million.

Like in 2007, he faces some questions in 2014. Some are football-related. He has not led the Cowboys to the playoffs since 2009. He has a 25-28 record since the beginning of the 2010 season. There are a lot of questions about his health because he is coming off his second back surgery in less than a year. He turned 34 last month.

But just like seven years ago, Jerry Jones backed Romo once again.

“I think that Tony has everything to do with this decision,” Jones said of Dallas' selecting OT Zack Martin over Manziel. “We have a big commitment to Tony. We feel that anything we look at at quarterback would be down the road and in the future in the development of that quarterback. If you look at the difficult dynamic, giving up this player [Martin] that really enhances what we can do on offense and what Tony can do for the future, just on a pretty quick consideration [taking Manziel] didn’t make sense. That was the driving force behind it.”

Chat recap: When will Cowboys go after QB?

April, 18, 2014
Apr 18
10:30
AM ET
IRVING, Texas -- We had another solid chat on Wednesday with a lot of draft questions.

We talked about trading up (I don’t see it happening), selecting Anthony Barr or Kony Ealy if both are available at No. 16 (Barr), taking a chance on Dominique Easley, the extra time leading up to the draft (hate it) and my all-time favorite Cowboy.

If you want to read the whole chat, click here.

I was also asked about drafting a quarterback.

R Lank, Md.: With romo 1 bad hit, and he's finished along with the uncertainty of orton why not draft a decent qb. at romo's age along with his injuries would u say that a high risk paying him that kind of money. I mean like u and (Jacques) said why pay age?

Todd Archer: When it comes to quarterbacks and left tackles, paying age doesn't seem as problematic for a lot of teams. I understand what you're saying about drafting a quarterback, but I don't see them going after a guy in the first two rounds. Maybe the third but more likely fourth or fifth. When you're picking a guy there, it's a projection more than a known commodity. Honestly, I think when Romo is done, whenever that is, the Cowboys will draft his replacement the following year and go with the guy.

Let me go a little deeper. For the last three or four years this has been a common question either because fans want the Cowboys to move on from Tony Romo or start the process of finding his replacement before it’s too late.

I’ve been a fan of selecting a quarterback every year, similar to the way Ron Wolf worked the draft with the Green Bay Packers. Clearly the Cowboys don’t share that belief, and I’ve just now come to the realization that when Romo’s career is over, then they will go ahead and find their next starter.

They don’t believe it makes sense to draft a quarterback, give him time to develop and then hand him the keys, say, the way the Packers did with Aaron Rodgers when they decided to move on from Brett Favre. It’s a risky strategy, but it’s what the Cowboys did after Troy Aikman retired.

They drafted Quincy Carter in the second round, surprisingly, and he won the job. They cut Tony Banks in camp so as there was no doubt Carter would be the guy. It didn’t work, although Carter did help the Cowboys to the playoffs in 2003.

Finding the next franchise quarterback took time for the Cowboys, and they got lucky in Romo. They looked to baseball and got Carter, Chad Hutchinson and Drew Henson. They looked at vets like Vinny Testaverde and Drew Bledsoe.

If you look at quarterbacks now, teams draft them and play them. Andy Dalton was a Day 1 starter with the Cincinnati Bengals after he was picked in the second round. Russell Wilson won the starting job with the Seattle Seahawks as a third round pick. Cam Newton, Sam Bradford, Matthew Stafford and Andrew Luck were No. 1 picks and starters from the beginning.

Ryan Tannehill (Miami Dolphins), Robert Griffin III (Washington Redskins), E.J. Manuel (Buffalo Bills), Geno Smith (New York Jets) and Matt Ryan (Atlanta Falcons) have been walk-in starters.

So whenever Romo is done – two, three or four years from now – that’s when I think the Cowboys go all in for a quarterback in the draft. And if (remember it’s still an if) that is the case, then there is a strong argument to take another offensive lineman at No. 16 next month.

With Tyron Smith, Travis Frederick and Offensive Lineman X, the Cowboys would have three first-round picks to protect an early-round quarterback. That would be a good way to break in a young quarterback. He would not be under siege behind a bad line.

Will this happen? Who knows, but it’s what I think could be the case.
Bill Parcells knows exactly why Quincy Carter failed with the Cowboys. And it has nothing to do with drugs. Or mental illness.

The 2001 second-roound pick -- the 53rd player taken -- had a substantial fear of success.

That's why he figured out a way to get released in training camp less than a year after leading the Cowboys to a 10-6 record and their first playoff berth since 1999.

"I became pretty close with Quincy personally, and this kid had a lot of good qualities," Parcells said. "He was smart. He understood it. But I just couldn’t save his ass. I really couldn’t.

"You just didn’t have the time. There he is, he got his team in the playoffs, he’s the starting quarterback of the Dallas Cowboys, he’s playing good, he’s improving, he can get out of trouble, he’s pretty smart, he can make almost every throw -- and it’s just, some people just can’t fight the pressure to succeed.

"They just can’t fight it. It’s too much on them once the bar gets up a little bit. It’s too much. I don’t know all the problems or the demons exactly, but that’s what eventually took him down."

Carter started three games for the New York Jets in 2004 and never played another NFL down.

Tony Romo was an undrafted free agent on the 2004 Cowboys, hoping to prove he belonged in the NFL. Forty-one-year-old Vinny Testeverde, who started 15 games, and Drew Henson were also on the roster for the Cowboys, who finished 6-10.

Less than three seasons later, Romo started his first game for the Cowboys. Now, he's one of the league's best quarterbacks.

Parcells wasn't surprised Romo received an opportunity to play.

"There were a couple of guys there that I knew I was going to have trouble counting on," Parcells said. "Henson because of his newness and he didn’t seem to be able to sort things out and Quincy because of, you know ... "

For modern game, Parcells will take Romo

August, 2, 2013
8/02/13
3:07
PM ET


CANTON, Ohio – Bill Parcells was extremely hard on his quarterbacks when he was a head coach.

He would have mostly one-sided arguments with Phil Simms, Drew Bledsoe and Vinny Testaverde over the years when something would go wrong and even when things would go right.

At the Pro Football Hall of Fame on Friday, Parcells, who will be inducted Saturday, was asked which quarterback he coached that he would want forever and Tony Romo was mentioned.

“Well, what do you want them for?” said Parcells, who coached the Cowboys from 2003-06. “If you want them for fighting it out, just fight it out to death -- Phil Simms. You want them for, OK, just passing the ball, you want to make this 100 percent passing, picturesque and classic, then I have to have Vinny Testaverde. Now if you want to play the modern game and you got to be elusive and get away from then, you give me Tony Romo.”

Parcells took to Romo quickly after signing him as an undrafted rookie, but he didn’t have Romo throw a pass in a regular-season game until 2006. Romo started 10 games in what turned out to be Parcells’ final season, going 6-4 and directing the Cowboys to the playoffs.

Over the years, they have stayed in touch mostly by telephone and Romo, like Jason Witten, can still hear Parcells in the back of his mind when he’s on the field.

“Bill is a big influence on me,” Romo said. “He taught me a lot about the game and the approach. He had some great wisdom in a lot of areas. It wasn’t just to manage the team. It was about people. It was about his ability to know little things you might be thinking or might be going on in your head. I think he’s pretty gifted at that.”

Cowboys must move on from Tony Romo

October, 29, 2012
10/29/12
8:00
AM ET
ARLINGTON, Texas -- It's time to move on.

The Dallas Cowboys need to plan their exit strategy from quarterback Tony Romo today or they're going to be stuck in the same situation they were in when Troy Aikman retired after the 2000 season.

After Aikman retired, the Cowboys turned to guys like Quincy Carter, Ryan Leaf, Chad Hutchinson, Vinny Testaverde and Drew Bledsoe to lead them.

Bledsoe and Testaverde were past their primes. The rest weren't good enough.

The Cowboys had a flawed plan.

That can't happen again.

Read why here.

SPONSORED HEADLINES

Insider