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Thursday, June 2, 2011
Tyson Chandler: 'I've got to make 'em pay'

By Jeff Caplan



MIAMI -- Plenty of responsibility is falling on the shoulders of Dallas Mavericks starting center Tyson Chandler starting with the need for increased rebounding. He finished Game 1 with just four and none in the second. Add a need for increased scoring to the list.

The Mavs thought to have the advantage over the Miami Heat's unconventional front line with 6-foot-9 Joel Anthony and 6-8 Udonis Haslem flanking 6-11 power forward Chris Bosh.

Chandler, who had nine points on 3-of-4 shooting from the field and 3-of-5 from the free throw line in 34 minutes, believes the Mavs can exploit the Miami Heat's decision to double-team  Dirk Nowitzki with two bigs by getting inside buckets. Backup center Brendan Haywood missed his only shot attempt -- a failed dunk that caught the underside of the rim -- although he did get to the free throw line six times.

"I thought our guys played OK. Haywood played terrific. Tyson didn't get into the game as much as he can," Mavs coach Rick Carlisle said. "But, it's a long series and those guys are going to have to have more of an impact for us and tonight is going to be another opportunity."

If the Heat continue to throw LeBron James on Jason Terry and double Nowitzki, Chandler, hurt by foul trouble in Game 1, said he's prepared to be in position to put more points on the board.

"I plan on it tonight," Chandler said. "What they do is they bring a big, but they rotate either LeBron, Dwyane or one of those guys back in front of me to try to take it away. But I've got to make whoever's in front of me ... I've got to make them pay, whether it's a big or small or whoever it is."

Mavs coach Rick Carlisle said it's not as easy as it sounds. The Heat's quick rotations get defenders into the lane to eliminate easy passes into Chandler for alley-oops or open layups.

"Those guys [James and Wade] are going to be active flooding into the lane, looking for the ball," Carlisle said. "And if they take those passing angles away, then the ball is going to have to skip and we're going to have to use the whole floor, and we're going to have to find shots."