Texas Rangers: 2012 Surprise position outlook

Surprise positional outlook: Front office

February, 16, 2012
2/16/12
11:01
PM CT
We wind up our Surprise positional outlook with the management team.

[+] EnlargeDaniels
AP Photo/Chris O'MearaGM Jon Daniels has helped transform the Rangers organization and made the big move of the offseason in signing Yu Darvish.
Today's position: Front office

OK, so it's not really a "position" on the field. But the Rangers' front office is a huge component at spring training.

First, they've assembled parts of the 2012 team. And it's a different one than 2011 in a few ways. The biggest offseason acquisition was Yu Darvish, of course. But the 25-year-old Japanese star isn't the only new face. Joe Nathan is now the team's closer, altering the bullpen.

The Nathan move has caused ripples elsewhere. It allows the Rangers to move Neftali Feliz to the rotation and with the starting depth, Alexi Ogando could end up back in the bullpen if everyone stays healthy. We'll see.

The reason the front office makes this outlook is that it will have a hand in the decisions made at spring training the next six weeks. When Tommy Hunter's groin injury popped up at the end of last spring, the baseball operations staff, along with the coaching staff, went over the options and determined that Ogando would go into the rotation. That was a big decision, and one that isn't simply made by the coaching staff.

RANGERS POSITION OUTLOOK
Jan. 23: Catcher
Jan. 24: First base
Jan. 25: Second base
Jan. 26: Third base
Jan. 27: Shortstop
Jan. 30: Left field
Jan. 31: Center field
Feb. 1: Right field
Feb. 2: DH/Utility
Feb. 3: Bench
Feb. 6: No. 1 starter
Feb. 7: No. 2 starter
Feb. 8: No. 3 starter
Feb. 9: No. 4 starter
Feb. 10: No. 5 starter
Feb. 13: Middle/long relief
Feb. 14: Late-inning relief
Feb. 15: Coaches
Feb. 16: Manager
Feb. 17: Front office
Decisions this spring will also be a collaborative effort, influenced by general manager Jon Daniels and his staff. That includes what happens in center field, who wins the final few spots on the roster and how things line up in terms of depth at other areas. We seen the last few springs that deals can be made in February and March, too.

Daniels and his staff are already considered some of the top management folks in the big leagues, thanks to how they built the Rangers from a last-place team into back-to-back AL champions. They've put their faith in Darvish, convincing ownership to put up the $51.7 million posting fee and then pay the pitcher another $60 million for six years. Spring training will be the first taste that they'll get to see how that investment looks.

That investment, of course, doesn't happen without Bob Simpson, Ray Davis and the Rangers board, which has given Daniels the financial backing to make some more moves this offseason.

Spring is also a chance for the management team to see some more of the club's minor league talent. Some of that talent gets to spend part of spring training with the big club. But as you walk the back fields, you'll find scouts and even upper management checking in on some of the younger players throughout the organization.

So don't forget about CEO and president Nolan Ryan, Daniels, assistant GM Thad Levine, A.J. Preller, Tim Purpura, Don Welke, Josh Boyd, Kip Fagg, Jake Krug, Matt Vinnola and a host of other key folks that will help make decisions that will no doubt impact the club's results in 2012.

Even before this spring, the front office was a big part of getting the club into contention. Here's a look at some of the key decisions made that led to this point.

Surprise positional outlook: Manager

February, 15, 2012
2/15/12
11:00
PM CT
A few weeks ago, manager Ron Washington earned a two-year contract extension, making him the skipper of the Rangers through 2014. Assuming he serves out the life of that contract, he could become the club’s all-time winningest manager and have managed the most games in the organization’s history.

[+] EnlargeRon Washington
Rick Osentoski/US PresswireRon Washington has led the Rangers to back-to-back World Series appearances and received a two-year contract exttension.
Today's position: Manager

We talked a lot about Washington’s style when he got the extension, but perhaps no team in the majors plays as hard for its manager as the Rangers do for Washington. He trusts his players but isn’t afraid to jump on them when needed. He’s honest, letting everyone know where they stand. And he’s a master motivator, making sure his team is prepared to play each day, but also loose and having fun.

He’s also improved as an in-game manager. Some of that is because of the trust he places in his coaches. But he’s learned when to let his gut make some key decisions for him and when to go by the book. He doesn’t get too caught up in statistics or matchups. And if he makes a mistake, he learns from it.

RANGERS POSITION OUTLOOK
Jan. 23: Catcher
Jan. 24: First base
Jan. 25: Second base
Jan. 26: Third base
Jan. 27: Shortstop
Jan. 30: Left field
Jan. 31: Center field
Feb. 1: Right field
Feb. 2: DH/Utility
Feb. 3: Bench
Feb. 6: No. 1 starter
Feb. 7: No. 2 starter
Feb. 8: No. 3 starter
Feb. 9: No. 4 starter
Feb. 10: No. 5 starter
Feb. 13: Middle/long relief
Feb. 14: Late-inning relief
Feb. 15: Coaches
Feb. 16: Manager
Feb. 17: Front office
Perhaps Washington’s biggest challenge in the early part of spring training will be to get his team to move on from how 2011 ended. He was able to rally them around a single goal last season after losing the Fall Classic in 2010. He must do it again, knowing the disappointment was a lot bigger in 2011. Washington isn’t concerned about it and says his group is mentally tough and will be ready to play.

Washington will be entering his sixth season and his teams have improved in wins every single season he’s been in the dugout. That’s not going to be easy in 2012 after the 2011 edition won a club-record 96 games.

“It’s not about the wins, it’s about improving how we play the game,” Washington said. “If we do that, all that stuff will work out.”

Surprise positional outlook: Coaching staff

February, 14, 2012
2/14/12
11:00
PM CT
We’ve talked about this for a few years now, but one major key to the Rangers’ success is the coaching staff. It’s a hard-working bunch that understands the players and likes and respects each other.

[+] EnlargeMike Maddux
Michael Zagaris/Getty ImagesPitching coach Mike Maddux has been instrumental in turning the Rangers' pitching staff around.
Today's position: Coaching staff (we'll get into Ron Washington tomorrow)

Pitching coach Mike Maddux is back for his fourth season and has helped transform the Rangers from an organization that many thought was simply big bats into one that has a pitching staff near the top in most categories in the AL.

Maddux has the ability to discover what each individual pitcher needs and how best to help him. The staff has changed a bit the past few years, but he’s done what he can to get the most out of it. That challenge continues in 2012 as he’ll oversee the transition Yu Darvish makes as he attempts to get big league hitters out. Maddux’s role in that process will be critical.

One thing you hear players talk about all the time is how hard Maddux and bullpen coach Andy Hawkins work. They are at the park early looking at video and helping prepare the scouting report on the opposing hitters for their pitchers. They’ll look at mechanics and help make adjustments there; anything they can do to help give their guys an edge. Hawkins is a big component of that combination and he helps run things out in the bullpen every game too, making sure guys are prepared to get in the games and watching throwing sessions, etc.

RANGERS POSITION OUTLOOK
Jan. 23: Catcher
Jan. 24: First base
Jan. 25: Second base
Jan. 26: Third base
Jan. 27: Shortstop
Jan. 30: Left field
Jan. 31: Center field
Feb. 1: Right field
Feb. 2: DH/Utility
Feb. 3: Bench
Feb. 6: No. 1 starter
Feb. 7: No. 2 starter
Feb. 8: No. 3 starter
Feb. 9: No. 4 starter
Feb. 10: No. 5 starter
Feb. 13: Middle/long relief
Feb. 14: Late-inning relief
Feb. 15: Coaches
Feb. 16: Manager
Feb. 17: Front office
On the hitting side of things, Scott Coolbaugh took over for Thad Bosley in May of last year when it was clear Bosley’s communication style wasn’t meshing with the club. Coolbaugh had the advantage of already working with many of the players at Triple-A and he came in and developed a trust with the offensive group. He returns for his first full season.

Around the bases, Dave Anderson returns at third base and will help coach the infielders. Gary Pettis, the baserunning guru, is back at first. And the wily old sage of the staff, Jackie Moore, will be by Washington’s side in the dugout as the bench coach.

One coach won’t be back. That’s Johnny Narron, who was an assistant hitting coach and is now the hitting coach in Milwaukee.

And while the athletic trainers, equipment and medical staff aren’t considered coaches, they are critical to getting the players ready to play. That includes Jamie Reed, head athletic trainer, who returns for his 10th season as medical director, and assistant athletic trainers Kevin Harmon and Matt Lucero. Raul Cardenas is the massage therapist. Jose Vazquez is the strength and conditioning coach, and if you’re walking around the back fields in Surprise you’ll see him on the half-football field working out players. Richard “Hoggy” Price is back as the home clubhouse equipment manager, and Kelly Terrell will work the visitor’s clubhouse. Josh Frasier returns for his 12th season with the Rangers and is the bullpen catcher, and Chris Lyngos will once again handle all of the travel arrangements.

Surprise positional outlook: Late relief

February, 13, 2012
2/13/12
11:00
PM CT
It’s amazing how things change in the span of a few months in the offseason.

[+] EnlargeJoe Nathan
AP Photo/ Richard W. RodriguezJoe Nathan was signed to take over the closer's role for Neftali Feliz, who is headed to the rotation.
Today's position: Late relief

When the 2011 season ended, Neftali Feliz was the Rangers’ closer. He was in that spot after the club tinkered with putting him in the rotation, but the club ended up leaving him in relief because the bullpen needed him and Feliz needed another season to refine his secondary stuff. The 2010 AL Rookie of the Year wasn’t able to replicate his memorable debut campaign. But he was solid in 2011, posting a 2.74 ERA with 32 saves in 62 1/3 innings. The season didn’t end the way he wanted, especially in Game 6 of the World Series with the club one strike away from a championship. Feliz was on the mound when the Cardinals tied the score in the bottom of the ninth and eventually won in extra innings.

Now, Feliz is in the rotation. Shortly after the season ended, general manager Jon Daniels made that declaration, saying he didn’t want Feliz to feel distracted with all the questions in the spring. That move was made after the club signed Joe Nathan, who takes Feliz’s spot as the closer.

Nathan gives the club some veteran experience and will show up in Surprise with something to prove. He had Tommy John surgery and struggled initially last year when he returned to the mound in the majors. But after a brief disabled list stint, Nathan’s second half was much more indicative of his usual numbers. He converted 11 of 12 save chances and had a 3.38 ERA with 28 strikeouts and five walks after returning from the DL in late June through the end of the season. The Rangers are banking that the Nathan they league saw in the second half of 2011 is the one that shows up in 2012.

RANGERS POSITION OUTLOOK
Jan. 23: Catcher
Jan. 24: First base
Jan. 25: Second base
Jan. 26: Third base
Jan. 27: Shortstop
Jan. 30: Left field
Jan. 31: Center field
Feb. 1: Right field
Feb. 2: DH/Utility
Feb. 3: Bench
Feb. 6: No. 1 starter
Feb. 7: No. 2 starter
Feb. 8: No. 3 starter
Feb. 9: No. 4 starter
Feb. 10: No. 5 starter
Feb. 13: Middle/long relief
Feb. 14: Late-inning relief
Feb. 15: Coaches
Feb. 16: Manager
Feb. 17: Front office
Of course, other pitchers have to get the game to Nathan in the ninth. Mike Adams will be one of those. The Rangers acquired Adams at the trade deadline last year from San Diego, shipping the Padres a couple of good, young arms in the process. The advantage to the deal for Texas was it got a pitcher under contract for 2012, too.

Adams also comes to spring with a bit of a chip on his shoulder. After putting up impressive numbers in the National League, Adams didn’t make as smooth a transition to the AL as he hoped. He’s vowed this offseason to learn the hitters and be even more prepared in 2012. His top priority is making sure he’s 100 percent healthy. Adams seemed to get fatigued at the end of the season and even after it ended, experienced some back pain. It turns out he needed hernia surgery. He expects to be ready to go by the time spring training games start.

Mark Lowe also returns after an up-and-down season. Just when he appeared to be in a groove, he suffered a Grade II left hamstring strain in September in Oakland and missed the rest of the season. He did return for part of the playoffs (and was on the mound when David Freese won Game 6 with the homer in the 11th). Lowe was 2-3 with a 3.80 ERA in 45 innings in 2011. He could end up as a seventh-inning type guy for this club.

Once all the dominoes fall with regards to the rotation, the bullpen will take clearer shape. But if everyone in the rotation stays healthy, there’s a good chance Alexi Ogando will factor into the late-inning mix. Ogando was a force in the bullpen in the playoffs and showed some versatility, as he was used in all kinds of innings and situations. He can pitch multiple innings if needed or could be used to get some key hitters out.

Pitching coach Mike Maddux, bullpen coach Andy Hawkins, manager Ron Washington and the coaching staff and front office will be watching and evaluating this spring as they look to put that relief corps together.

Surprise positional outlook: Long/mid relief

February, 12, 2012
2/12/12
11:00
PM CT
The Rangers are fully stocked when it comes to starting rotation candidates. That has a ripple effect in that the pitchers who don’t make the rotation can slide into the bullpen and help there.

[+] EnlargeScott Feldman
Kim Klement/US PresswireScott Feldman has a starter's mindset and has the ability to pitch multiple innings in relief for the Rangers.
Today's position: Long/middle relief

As spring training begins, we can take some pretty good guesses at what might happen should the pitching staff stay healthy (a big if when you consider some of the injuries in spring the last few seasons). Colby Lewis, Derek Holland and Yu Darvish certainly appear locks for the rotation. The club is committed to giving Neftali Feliz a chance to start. That leaves one spot open.

It seems likely that Matt Harrison would keep his spot there and Alexi Ogando would head to the bullpen. That scenario would not impact long relief, as Ogando would be more of a late-inning weapon like he was in the postseason. Of course, that doesn’t mean that he won’t pitch in the sixth inning. The beauty of Ogando, as the baseball world discovered in the 2011 playoffs, is that he can pitch in just about any inning in relief.

So what about long relief options? The No. 1 candidate is Scott Feldman. First, he’s making a hefty sum of $6.5 million in 2012 thanks to the contract he signed after winning 17 games in 2009. He had microfracture surgery on his right knee after a disappointing 2010 season and missed the first half of the 2011 season. The Rangers wanted Feldman to agree to pitch in the minors once he was healthy enough to return, but he had enough service time to make his own choice and decided to stay in the majors. He said he wanted to help the big league club, and to his credit, he did. He made two spot starts to help give some pitchers some extra days of rest down the stretch and also pitched in relief, though a blister hampered him a bit. Feldman gives the Rangers someone who can certainly handle multiple innings and has the mindset of a starter.

RANGERS POSITION OUTLOOK
Jan. 23: Catcher
Jan. 24: First base
Jan. 25: Second base
Jan. 26: Third base
Jan. 27: Shortstop
Jan. 30: Left field
Jan. 31: Center field
Feb. 1: Right field
Feb. 2: DH/Utility
Feb. 3: Bench
Feb. 6: No. 1 starter
Feb. 7: No. 2 starter
Feb. 8: No. 3 starter
Feb. 9: No. 4 starter
Feb. 10: No. 5 starter
Feb. 13: Middle/long relief
Feb. 14: Late-inning relief
Feb. 15: Coaches
Feb. 16: Manager
Feb. 17: Front office
Michael Kirkman is another option. He began the 2011 season in the Triple-A Round Rock rotation (after spending some time with the big league club in spring training), but was 0-3 with a 6.40 ERA in seven starts and moved to the bullpen. Once there, Kirkman was 3-0 with a 3.98 ERA in 20 relief appearances. The Rangers come into spring trying to sort out their left-handed relief options, and Kirkman figures into the mix. But he’s also a multi-inning guy and could help in that middle relief role.

That left-handed spot will be one to watch this spring. The Rangers had Darren Oliver and Mike Gonzalez last year, but neither is on the roster now. Oliver will pitch for Toronto and Gonzalez, who had knee surgery, is still on the market. The Rangers have signed a couple of lefties to minor-league deals with invitations to big league camp. Among those are Joe Beimel and Mitch Stetter, who have major league experience.

Injuries could clearly alter what happens in the bullpen, but so could the fact that a slew of folks will be in camp with a chance to show something. One guy to keep an eye on is Tanner Scheppers, who is hoping to prove that he can become a solid reliever. He comes to camp knowing that’s the role the club sees for him, rather than starting right now. Cody Eppley, who appeared in 10 games last year, will also be in Surprise, as will some of the club’s high-level prospects who might not quite be ready for the majors yet. Yoshi Tateyama, who could have a big impact on Yu Darvish and his transition, can also pitch multiple innings, though he needs to get better against left-handed batters.

Watching how it all shakes out will be part of the fun of spring.

Surprise positional outlook: No. 5 starter

February, 9, 2012
2/09/12
11:10
PM CT
We've come to the end of our starting rotation outlooks and it's a former closer who we'll discuss today.

[+] EnlargeNeftali Feliz
Tim Heitman/US PresswireThe Rangers want to find out this season whether Neftali Feliz can be an effective starter.
Today's position: No. 5 starter

The Rangers want to find out this season whether Neftali Feliz can start. They told him shortly after the season ended that he'd be moving into the rotation and to prepare for a spot. GM Jon Daniels said he wanted to avoid all the questions during spring training about if Feliz would make the rotation. So he heads to spring training with a place in the rotation.

Feliz's season ended with a national TV audience watching in Game 6 of the World Series. You know the details, but after Feliz gave up the two-out, two-strike hit to tie the score, the coaching staff felt he wasn't in any condition to pitch the 10th inning. The Rangers ended up losing in 11 innings and Feliz walked from the clubhouse to the bus with his head down.

Now, months after that event, Feliz says he's focused on starting and helping the team in the rotation. He said at Rangers FanFest in January that the bottom of the ninth in Game 6 was something that "really, really upset me a lot."

RANGERS POSITION OUTLOOK
Jan. 23: Catcher
Jan. 24: First base
Jan. 25: Second base
Jan. 26: Third base
Jan. 27: Shortstop
Jan. 30: Left field
Jan. 31: Center field
Feb. 1: Right field
Feb. 2: DH/Utility
Feb. 3: Bench
Feb. 6: No. 1 starter
Feb. 7: No. 2 starter
Feb. 8: No. 3 starter
Feb. 9: No. 4 starter
Feb. 10: No. 5 starter
Feb. 13: Middle/long relief
Feb. 14: Late-inning relief
Feb. 15: Coaches
Feb. 16: Manager
Feb. 17: Front office
"But I'm not mad at myself because I threw my pitch," said Feliz, who surrendered the game-tying double off the bat of David Freese after getting within one strike of the championship. "It just got hit."

Feliz said he's still thought about that night, but has vowed to move on. He'll get a chance now with a new role on the Rangers as he attempts to prove he can start.

The Rangers, in an effort to help prepare Feliz for the challenge, organized a meeting with Pedro Martinez. Feliz talked with Martinez earlier this offseason and said he was planning on meeting him again so that Martinez could watch him pitch and give him some pointers.

"Coming form a guy like him who I always admired as a kid, I took it very seriously," Feliz said. "He gave me advice about mental things and toughness. He was sincere with me. He said 'Be patient and don't get anxious. You'll get adjusted to it.'"

Feliz must show he can handle the workload of a starter. That means hard work in the offseason and staying in shape during the season. Feliz has that 100 mph fastball and the ability to change speeds. He said his slider and changeup must be more effective and that will be a focus this spring.

One of the biggest spring training stories will be Feliz's progress and if that electric fastball, combined with his secondary stuff, will be good enough to be a successful starter. We'll get our first sense of that in a few weeks.

Surprise positional outlook: No. 4 starter

February, 8, 2012
2/08/12
11:00
PM CT
We're still looking at the Rangers' starting rotation with our quick-hit outlooks heading into spring training later this month.

[+] EnlargeMatt Harrison
Tim Heitman/US PresswireMatt Harrison pitched a career-high 185 2/3 innings and was 14-9 with 126 strikeouts and 57 walks in 2011. The Rangers won 13 of his final 16 starts and were 20-10 in his 30 starts overall.
Today's position: No. 4 starter

Let's talk about Matt Harrison, who could fall into the No. 4 spot, just behind Yu Darvish and breaking up the lefties with Derek Holland in the No. 2 slot. Again, the Rangers haven't set the rotation, so this is mere speculation.

Harrison was another young starter who took an important step in 2011. After starting the 2009 and 2010 seasons in the rotation, Harrison wasn't able to finish either season there. Left shoulder inflammation that was later diagnosed as Thoracic Outlet Syndrome cut short his 2009 season. He was the club's fifth starter in 2010 and made six starts before landing on the DL with biceps tendinitis. He returned as a member of the bullpen.

A good spring in 2011 helped him break for the third consecutive spring in the rotation, but this time he held his spot. Harrison pitched a career-high 185 2/3 innings and was 14-9 with 126 strikeouts and 57 walks. The Rangers won 13 of his final 16 starts and were 20-10 in his 30 starts overall. He stayed healthy for the most part, too. He missed a start because of a blister on his left index finger, but he played through a kidney stone and didn't let a line drive off his left triceps force him to miss time.

He did all of it despite having the lowest run support average among Texas starters per nine innings (4.99). He received three runs or fewer in 18 of his 30 starts. Harrison pitched at least six innings in 23 starts, yet was the only member of the season-opening rotation without a complete game.

RANGERS POSITION OUTLOOK
Jan. 23: Catcher
Jan. 24: First base
Jan. 25: Second base
Jan. 26: Third base
Jan. 27: Shortstop
Jan. 30: Left field
Jan. 31: Center field
Feb. 1: Right field
Feb. 2: DH/Utility
Feb. 3: Bench
Feb. 6: No. 1 starter
Feb. 7: No. 2 starter
Feb. 8: No. 3 starter
Feb. 9: No. 4 starter
Feb. 10: No. 5 starter
Feb. 13: Middle/long relief
Feb. 14: Late-inning relief
Feb. 15: Coaches
Feb. 16: Manager
Feb. 17: Front office
In the postseason, Harrison was up and down. He was the winning pitcher in Game 4 of the ALDS, which sent the Rangers to the ALCS. But Harrison also started Game 7 of the World Series and allowed three runs on five hits in four innings (two of those runs were in the bottom of the first after the Rangers had taken a 2-0 lead). He had a 7.04 ERA in the World Series in two starts. Still, it was valuable experience and Harrison has vowed to learn from it.

"Being able to make pretty much all my starts last year was big for me and get that full season starting under my belt, which I wasn’t able to do the two previous seasons breaking camp," said Harrison, before signing autographs at the Rangers Caravan stop in Frisco late last month. "Hopefully, this year I can do the same thing and go out there and give them a chance to win every time out.

"I really feel like I’m prepared to go physically too and am looking forward to learning from last year and improving on the mistakes I made."

Harrison feels good about his conditioning and wants to continue to build strength and stamina. He certainly comes into spring training in a different frame of mind thanks to his staying power in 2011.

Surprise positional outlook: No. 3 starter

February, 7, 2012
2/07/12
11:00
PM CT


The guy we've slotted as the No. 3 starter will be drawing plenty of interest in spring training.

Today's position: No. 3 starter

[+] EnlargeYu Darvish
Kirby Lee/Image of Sport/US PresswireYu Darvish was 18-6 last season in Japan with a league-best 1.44 ERA and 276 strikeouts. He walked just 36 batters in 232 innings.
We've given that designation to Yu Darvish, the 25-year-old Japanese star pitcher who signed for approximately $60 million over six years in January after the Rangers won the right to negotiate with Darvish thanks to a $51.7 million posting bid.

Darvish comes into camp amid high expectations. The Rangers have made a major investment in him and believe he has the potential to be the club's ace. But no one is throwing that label on Darvish yet. They want him to get settled in and start making all the necessary adjustments. And there are a bunch. He'll be throwing a different baseball, learning major league hitters, figuring out the language barrier, meeting new teammates and living away from home in a different country.

So spring training is important for him. He'll be working with pitching coach Mike Maddux and bullpen coach Andy Hawkins nearly every day and will have Joe Furukawa, one of the club's chief Japanese scouts, helping him as a translator when needed. Darvish will also be bringing over someone he knows to help him out. But he won't have a large entourage.

RANGERS POSITION OUTLOOK
Jan. 23: Catcher
Jan. 24: First base
Jan. 25: Second base
Jan. 26: Third base
Jan. 27: Shortstop
Jan. 30: Left field
Jan. 31: Center field
Feb. 1: Right field
Feb. 2: DH/Utility
Feb. 3: Bench
Feb. 6: No. 1 starter
Feb. 7: No. 2 starter
Feb. 8: No. 3 starter
Feb. 9: No. 4 starter
Feb. 10: No. 5 starter
Feb. 13: Middle/long relief
Feb. 14: Late-inning relief
Feb. 15: Coaches
Feb. 16: Manager
Feb. 17: Front office
"We're not going to spring training with these great expectations that he's going to shine over everybody else," Rangers CEO Nolan Ryan said the day Darvish signed. "We want him to come in and fit in and make the adjustment of being over here, being in major league baseball for the first time. As we go through spring training and the early part of the season, he'll start showing what he's capable of doing."

The question will be how well Darvish's numbers from Japan will translate in the big leagues. We've talked about this a lot on the blog, but the Rangers' scouts are confident, after having seen him at length for the last few seasons, that his stuff is good enough to get major league hitters out. He has seven pitches and Maddux has indicated that Darvish will likely decrease that to four or five and work hard at refining them and making them as good as they can possibly be. Here's a scouting report on Darvish, BTW.

He was 18-6 last season with a league-best 1.44 ERA and 276 strikeouts. He walked just 36 batters in 232 innings.

"We saw a guy that we felt was built to pitch innings and has a classic pitcher's build," GM Jon Daniels said shortly after Darvish signed. "He has a real commitment to his conditioning and work ethic. We think he can pitch innings at a high caliber for a large amount of time."

Darvish pitched in the 2009 World Baseball Classic and the 2008 Beijing Olympics. He has been consistent after getting through some growing pains in his rookie season at age 18. He was 93-38 with a 1.99 ERA in his career in Japan.

Darvish said all the right things at his news conference in Arlington a few weeks ago and then thanked fans (apparently more than 10,000 of them showed up) when he returned to Japan. Now he has to show the ability that the Rangers are banking will make a difference the next six seasons.

It's unclear what order the Rangers' rotation will take this season, but we put Darvish at No. 3, thinking that manager Ron Washington could put him between left-hander Derek Holland and left-hander Matt Harrison.

Surprise positional outlook: No. 2 starter

February, 6, 2012
2/06/12
11:55
PM CT
Our race through the Rangers' rotation continues all week.

Today's position: No. 2 starter

[+] EnlargeDerek Holland
AP Photo/Charlie RiedelLHP Derek Holland was 16-5 with a 3.95 ERA in 32 starts in 2011, inlcuding 10-1 with a 2.77 ERA in his final 15 starts of the regular season.
We've designated this spot to Derek Holland, though the exact order of the rotation has yet to be determined.

Holland, 25, took an important step forward in 2011. The left-handed pitcher was 16-5 with a 3.95 ERA in 32 starts, pitching 198 innings -- by far the highest of his professional career. It was his pitching down the stretch that opened eyes, though. Starting July 7, Holland was 10-1 with a 2.77 ERA in his final 15 regular-season starts. His ERA dropped from 5.10 to 3.95 in that span. Only Cy Young winner Justin Verlander had more wins in that stretch in the American League.

Holland's mental toughness increased, too. He was able to grind through more innings and do a better job of getting past any hurdles during a start. He credits talking with some of his veteran teammates as a big reason why he was in a better place with his mental game.

Holland had four complete game shutouts, tied with Tampa Bay's James Shields for the AL lead in that category (two behind Cliff Lee for the big league high). It was a Rangers club record for a left-handed pitcher and the most since Doc Medich had four complete-game shutouts in 1981. Only one Ranger had more shutouts in a season (Fergie Jenkins had six in 1974).

RANGERS POSITION OUTLOOK
Jan. 23: Catcher
Jan. 24: First base
Jan. 25: Second base
Jan. 26: Third base
Jan. 27: Shortstop
Jan. 30: Left field
Jan. 31: Center field
Feb. 1: Right field
Feb. 2: DH/Utility
Feb. 3: Bench
Feb. 6: No. 1 starter
Feb. 7: No. 2 starter
Feb. 8: No. 3 starter
Feb. 9: No. 4 starter
Feb. 10: No. 5 starter
Feb. 13: Middle/long relief
Feb. 14: Late-inning relief
Feb. 15: Coaches
Feb. 16: Manager
Feb. 17: Front office
He started the season as the club's No. 4 starter and much of the offseason talk was about how he'd rebound from a rough World Series relief appearance. Holland threw 13 pitches in the eighth inning of Game 2 and 12 of them were balls. But Holland said even before spring training that he had a bad inning and was moving on. And he did.

After the impressive second-half of 2011, Holland went into the postseason full of confidence. He ended up pitching in six games (four of them starts) and was 2-0 with a 3.38 ERA with 14 strikeouts and eight walks in 24 innings. But he was inconsistent in the 2011 postseason until the night of Game 4 of the World Series. After a pep talk from manager Ron Washington, Holland went out and put together a memorable performance. He threw 8 1/3 scoreless innings and was in total control after Adrian Beltre gloved a liner off the bat of Rafael Furcal to start the game. It took away a double and Holland didn't have many hard-hit balls off him after that.

The start put the Rangers right back in the series, tying things at two games apiece. What it does for Holland from here will be fun to watch. It certainly sent him into the offseason with confidence. He's got the stuff to be successful, as the second half of 2011 showed, and now he knows he can compete on baseball's biggest stage.

Washington has talked about Holland's attitude this offseason and how he knows he can't take anything for granted, but at the same time has lofty goals and wants to do everything he can to achieve them. He heads into 2012 as one of the bright, up-and-coming left-handed starters in the game.

Surprise positional outlook: Bench

February, 3, 2012
2/03/12
12:01
AM CT
Don't discount the importance of the bench for the Rangers in 2012. The bench certainly had an impact in the World Series.

[+] EnlargeBrad Hawpe
AP Photo/Chris CarlsonBrad Hawpe is coming off Tommy John surgery but could be in the mix in the outfield and at first.
Today's position: Bench

We'll make a few assumptions as we start discussing the bench. One is that the starting outfield is Josh Hamilton, Craig Gentry and Nelson Cruz. There are no guarantees on anything, but Gentry will be given a chance to earn the job and at this point, we'll slot him there.

That leaves David Murphy as the next outfielder on the list (and someone we discussed in our left field outlook earlier this week) and puts the fifth outfield spot up for grabs. Julio Borbon, Leonys Martin and Brad Hawpe will be in camp. Martin, just like Engel Beltre, probably isn't ready for the big leagues quite yet. He hit the ball very well in Double-A last year, but then struggled at Triple-A. He's worked hard this offseason on several facets of his game and we'll see what he's got in Surprise.

RANGERS POSITION OUTLOOK
Jan. 23: Catcher
Jan. 24: First base
Jan. 25: Second base
Jan. 26: Third base
Jan. 27: Shortstop
Jan. 30: Left field
Jan. 31: Center field
Feb. 1: Right field
Feb. 2: DH/Utility
Feb. 3: Bench
Feb. 6: No. 1 starter
Feb. 7: No. 2 starter
Feb. 8: No. 3 starter
Feb. 9: No. 4 starter
Feb. 10: No. 5 starter
Feb. 13: Middle/long relief
Feb. 14: Late-inning relief
Feb. 15: Coaches
Feb. 16: Manager
Feb. 17: Front office
Hawpe is an interesting possibility, in that if he can prove he's healthy, he can play first base and the outfield. He had Tommy John surgery last season and is out to show that he can still play. He says he feels good and will be ready to go for spring training. He could figure into the mix on the bench if he shows something (he's on a minor-league deal). Brandon Snyder, signed from the Orioles organization, also plays first base and will be at spring training. Remember, of course, that Michael Young and Mike Napoli can play first on days when Mitch Moreland isn't in the lineup.

The club is still in the market for a utility player that can handle shortstop. So that's likely a bench spot there. Luis Hernandez was signed to a minor league deal and can play short, so he'll get a look. Others will trickle in as well (similar to what the club did in 2010 before deciding on Andres Blanco).

And as we discussed in our Surprise positional outlook opener, Yorvit Torrealba comes in as the backup catcher. But he'll get plenty of playing time in the heat and both Napoli and Torrealba could be in the lineup at the same time some, as well, something we saw in 2011.

So we'll see how it all shakes out. The utility infield spot and how the Rangers handle the final outfield spot in forming their bench will be interesting this spring.

Surprise positional outlook: DH/Utility

February, 1, 2012
2/01/12
11:00
PM CT
We're nearly halfway done with our Surprise positional outlooks (which means we're getting even closer to pitchers and catchers reporting in Arizona for the start of spring training).

[+] EnlargeMichael Young
AP Photo/Charlie RiedelMichael Young learned to play first base last spring and started at five positions in 2011.
Today's positions: Designated hitter and utility

It was a remarkable 2011 for veteran Michael Young, who is both a DH and a super-utility infielder. He was one of the biggest stories of the offseason after his name popped up in trade talks and, indicating there were trust issues with the front office, wanted to be traded.

Can you imagine if the Rangers actually had traded Young? The 35-year-old veteran did what he always does when a trade didn't happen: He put his team first. He didn't complain anymore about it to the media. He told his teammates when he arrived in Surprise that he was there to work and help them get back to the World Series. And he let his play speak for him after that.

Young had to learn a new position -- first base. He was no longer the club's starting third baseman with the signing of Adrian Beltre to a five-year deal (with an option for a sixth) prior to the 2011 season. Young was asked to be the club's primary DH and also to fill in when injury or rest was needed with one of the infielders. His versatility and consistency at the plate certainly helped that transition.

Young simply had one of the best seasons of his career. He hit a career-best .338, the third-highest single-season figure in club history. He recorded his sixth career 200-hit season and put up a career-high 106 RBIs. He did it while starting at five different positions.

RANGERS POSITION OUTLOOK
Jan. 23: Catcher
Jan. 24: First base
Jan. 25: Second base
Jan. 26: Third base
Jan. 27: Shortstop
Jan. 30: Left field
Jan. 31: Center field
Feb. 1: Right field
Feb. 2: DH/Utility
Feb. 3: Bench
Feb. 6: No. 1 starter
Feb. 7: No. 2 starter
Feb. 8: No. 3 starter
Feb. 9: No. 4 starter
Feb. 10: No. 5 starter
Feb. 13: Middle/long relief
Feb. 14: Late-inning relief
Feb. 15: Coaches
Feb. 16: Manager
Feb. 17: Front office
For a player who was expected to get most of his at-bats at DH, Young actually played the field more than DH in 2011. He made 39 starts at third base, filling in while Beltre was on the disabled list, and 36 starts at first. He also started 13 games at second and even one at short. Young is the only player in MLB history to play 35 or more games at three different positions in a season in which he had 200 or more hits (Elias Sports Bureau). He was second in the majors in multi-hit games (61) and had a club-record 25 games of three or more hits (tied with Adrian Gonzalez for most in the big leagues).

Young provided manager Ron Washington with plenty of flexibility, making sure he could keep his bat in the lineup. Once again, Young played the season without major injury. In fact, he's had only one full season in which he didn't play at least 155 games (played 135 games in 2009 thanks to missing most of September with a strained left hamstring). He's reliable and consistent and he batted fifth at the beginning of the season and then cleanup once Beltre went on the DL.

Young's leadership and work ethic was once again on display in 2011 and he'll be focused (and will help his team stay focused) on getting back to the World Series for a third straight season.

Part of Young's role is utility. But the club is also looking for a utility infielder. They'll have candidates at spring training (and more could show up) as they try to find someone who can play shortstop and help back everyone up. One of those is Luis Hernandez, a 27-year-old who is playing in the Carribean World Series this week.

But having Young is a big boost for Washington, who can slide him in anywhere in the infield and feel good about it.

For a look back at Young's season, click here for a column written just before the playoffs.

Surprise positional outlook: Right field

January, 31, 2012
1/31/12
11:00
PM CT
We move over to right field now as our Surprise positional outlook series continues.

Today's position: Right field

[+] EnlargeNelson Cruz
Rick Osentoski/US PresswireNelson Cruz had his highs -- a three-run homer in the 11th inning of Game 4 of the ALCS -- and his lows -- misjudging a fly ball in Game 6 of the World Series -- last season.
Nelson Cruz's 2011 season was a memorable one. He hit 29 homers, had 87 RBIs and batted .263 despite playing in only 124 games because of two disabled list stints (one in May for a strained right quadriceps and another in September with a strained left hamstring). The 29 home runs were the second-most of his career (33 in 2009) and it was the third straight season where he hit 20 or more homers. He averaged a homer every 16.38 at-bats, seventh-best in the league (he had five homers in his first 10 games of 2011). His RBI total was the highest of his career (78 in 2010). He also had a team-high 116 strikeouts. Cruz struggled to find consistency after returning from his first DL stint, but from July 20 through the end of the season, he hit .305.

In the field, Cruz's arm was a real weapon. He led Rangers' outfielders with six assists and was solid in right field.

All of his skills were on display in the 2011 ALCS against the Detroit Tigers. Cruz was named the series MVP after belting six homers and piling up 13 RBIs, both big league records for a postseason series. Cruz's most memorable hit was a grand slam in the 11th inning of Game 2. Cruz had tied the game in the seventh inning and then won it when he hit a 1-2 slider out to left field. The 50,000-plus at Rangers Ballpark in Arlington went crazy.

Cruz also used his arm in that series, gunning down Miguel Cabrera at home plate in the eighth inning of Game 4. The score was tied at that point. Cruz then hit a three-run homer in the 11th to put the Rangers comfortably ahead. They took a 3-1 series lead and eventually won the series in six games.

RANGERS POSITION OUTLOOK
Jan. 23: Catcher
Jan. 24: First base
Jan. 25: Second base
Jan. 26: Third base
Jan. 27: Shortstop
Jan. 30: Left field
Jan. 31: Center field
Feb. 1: Right field
Feb. 2: DH/Utility
Feb. 3: Bench
Feb. 6: No. 1 starter
Feb. 7: No. 2 starter
Feb. 8: No. 3 starter
Feb. 9: No. 4 starter
Feb. 10: No. 5 starter
Feb. 13: Middle/long relief
Feb. 14: Late-inning relief
Feb. 15: Coaches
Feb. 16: Manager
Feb. 17: Front office
Cruz was not able to replicate his ALCS performance in the World Series. He batted just .200 (5-for-25) with two homers and three RBIs. And, of course, he was involved in the crazy ending of Game 6 after the ball tailed away from him in the right field corner, allowing the Cardinals to tie the game despite being down to their last strike.

Cruz, like the rest of the Rangers, must put 2011 behind him and move on to 2012. His focus last offseason was strengthening his legs to guard against injury. Despite that, he still had two stints on the DL. Coupled with injuries in 2010, he's been on the DL five times in the last two seasons.

But Cruz gives the lineup power and showed in 2011 he can drive in more runs. He's an integral part of the offense and is capable of big-time hot streaks.

When Cruz wasn't in right field, the versatile David Murphy started 27 games. And Mitch Moreland, who can play first base and outfield, started 28 games. With the club's current configuration, manager Ron Washington said he doesn't intend for Moreland to play much outfield this season. Newly-signed Brad Hawpe can also play out there, if he's able to do enough to make the team (more on him when we look at the bench).

Surprise positional outlook: Center field

January, 30, 2012
1/30/12
11:00
PM CT
Let's stay in the outfield for now and move over to center, where there are some candidates hoping for playing time in 2012.

[+] EnlargeCraig Gentry
AP Photo/Paul BattagliaCraig Gentry will get a chance to win the center field job after doing a nice job when he was called up in May.
Today's position: Center field

As we discussed on Monday, the Rangers would like to keep Josh Hamilton in left field as much as possible. But that doesn't mean he won't play center. Last season, Hamilton started 30 games in center. That was third-most on the team in 2011. But again, the plan is to watch Hamilton's body, and the club feels the wear and tear isn't as bad in left field.

So who gets the job out there? Spring training should be pretty interesting. Endy Chavez, who started a team-high 59 games in center, signed a one-year deal with the Orioles.

That leaves Craig Gentry as the returning player with the most experience, and he's going to get his shot to win the job (and, if you ask me, he deserves it). He's spent the offseason playing winter ball to get more at-bats and is focused on showing he belongs in that job full-time in 2012.

Gentry was called up in May when Nelson Cruz went on the disabled list and, outside of a two-week stint on the concussion disabled list, he stayed on the active roster. He started 33 games in center field in 2011 and the 28-year-old ended up hitting .271 with a homer and 13 RBIs. His speed was a weapon tracking balls down in center and also on the bases, where he was 18-for-18 in stolen bases. One of his focuses this season is attempting more steals to take even more advantage of his speed.

RANGERS POSITION OUTLOOK
Jan. 23: Catcher
Jan. 24: First base
Jan. 25: Second base
Jan. 26: Third base
Jan. 27: Shortstop
Jan. 30: Left field
Jan. 31: Center field
Feb. 1: Right field
Feb. 2: DH/Utility
Feb. 3: Bench
Feb. 6: No. 1 starter
Feb. 7: No. 2 starter
Feb. 8: No. 3 starter
Feb. 9: No. 4 starter
Feb. 10: No. 5 starter
Feb. 13: Middle/long relief
Feb. 14: Late-inning relief
Feb. 15: Coaches
Feb. 16: Manager
Feb. 17: Front office
Julio Borbon, who started 28 games in center, was put on the disabled list with a strained left hamstring and then was in the minors until an ankle injury required surgery, ending his season. Borbon will return to spring training hoping he can show the club that he deserves a look.

Leonys Martin will also be at spring training and is considered a center fielder of the future. But that future may not be 2012. He hit .348 at Double-A in 29 games (112 at-bats), forcing his way into Triple-A. There he had a tougher time, batting .263 with 17 RBIs and nine stolen bases in 40 games (175 at-bats). The 2012 season will be a big one for him to see how he improves and learns from last season.

Of course, the offseason isn't over yet and the club could look at other options in center. But it will be one of the most interesting positions to keep an eye on in Surprise this spring.

Surprise positional outlook: Left field

January, 29, 2012
1/29/12
11:00
PM CT
It's now time to take a look at the outfield, and we'll do that by starting on the left side.

Today's position: Left field

[+] EnlargeJosh Hamilton
Rob Carr/Getty ImagesAn injured Josh Hamilton hit just one home run in the postseason, but it nearly won the Rangers a title. The slugger started 81 games in left field in 2011 in an effort to decrease wear and tear.
For a few seasons now, the Rangers have headed to spring training with a goal in mind: keep Josh Hamilton in left field for as many games as possible. Why? Because the club has felt that it helps decrease the wear and tear on his body.

Well, no one played left field more for the Rangers in 2011 than Hamilton. He started 81 games at the position and had a .975 fielding percentage while out there, too. Of course, there are still walls in left field, but he doesn't have as much ground to cover and isn't having to run at top speed all over the place quite as often.

Hamilton, once again, put up solid numbers. He hit .298 with 25 homers and 94 RBIs in 121 games. A home plate collision in Detroit forced him to miss nearly six weeks as he nursed a hairline fracture in a bone in his upper right arm. He came back and continued to play at a high level. He batted .343 in July, helping him hit .295 with 14 homers and 45 RBIs after the All-Star break.

Hamilton also showed a penchant for clutch hits. He had 20 game-winning RBIs. No one in the AL had more (only Ryan Howard had more in the big leagues at 23). Hamilton had 27 go-ahead RBIs, tied for fourth-most in the AL.

RANGERS POSITION OUTLOOK
Jan. 23: Catcher
Jan. 24: First base
Jan. 25: Second base
Jan. 26: Third base
Jan. 27: Shortstop
Jan. 30: Left field
Jan. 31: Center field
Feb. 1: Right field
Feb. 2: DH/Utility
Feb. 3: Bench
Feb. 6: No. 1 starter
Feb. 7: No. 2 starter
Feb. 8: No. 3 starter
Feb. 9: No. 4 starter
Feb. 10: No. 5 starter
Feb. 13: Middle/long relief
Feb. 14: Late-inning relief
Feb. 15: Coaches
Feb. 16: Manager
Feb. 17: Front office
But because of the movement of the outfield and the need for Hamilton to play center field at times, the slugger actually played more games in left field in 2010 than he did in 2011. The Rangers would like to keep Hamilton in left as often as they can in 2012, but that may depend on what happens in center field (stay tuned for that tomorrow).

Hamilton was a warrior in the playoffs, competing despite three detached adductors in his left leg and a torn abdominal muscle. It was clear Hamilton was hurting, especially in the World Series. He hit just one home run in the postseason thanks in large part to trouble getting his bat speed up. Yet that home run was nearly the championship-winner, after hitting it in the top of the 10th. You know what happened next.

Hamilton says he feels great following surgery and is doing full workouts and swinging a bat. His contract expires after the 2012 season and he's set a deadline for the beginning of spring training to get a deal done. If there's no deal, he's said he wants to talk to the Rangers before any other team after the season is over. But he doesn't want the distraction of contracts talks during the season (the Rangers usually prefer it that way too, BTW). As we've chatted about here on the blog, putting a value on Hamilton is difficult because of his injury history. How many years do you pay him? Do you give him an annual salary as if he's healthy? (I don't see how you do that with his injury history). It's complicated, but few players impact a game like Hamilton.

But Hamilton wasn't the only left fielder in 2011. David Murphy started 62 games (played 78) in left field. Nelson Cruz even started 16 games with Endy Chavez (2) and Craig Gentry (1) also seeing a little time there.

Murphy's Rangers career, it seems, is all about being under the radar. But he's an important, versatile player for this outfield. He struggled in May, batting just .191. But Murphy figured it out and hit .375 in July and .351 in September. Murphy played well in the postseason, batting .317 with eight walks and six strikeouts. He had three RBIs and four extra-base hits, getting 41 at-bats.

So look for the 2010 AL MVP to get as much time as possible out in left field. And for Murphy to be a key contributor out there (as usual).

Surprise positional outlook: Shortstop

January, 27, 2012
1/27/12
12:01
AM CT
We've looked at catcher, first base, second base and third base so far this week. We'll finish things off in the infield with shortstop. (We'll continue our previews next week, of course.)

Today's position: Shortstop

[+] EnlargeElvis Andrus
John Rivera/Icon SMElvis Andrus has the ability to make plays other shortstops can't, but errors on routine plays have been a problem.
It doesn't seem like a long time ago that Michael Young was asked to move from shortstop to third base (right after winning a Gold Glove) so that a young, promising prospect could start at one of the most important positions on the field.

That was actually prior to the 2009 season. And the Rangers' logic made sense. They said then that they felt the competitive window for Texas was going to really start opening up in 2010 (most thought 2011 would be a year the club could contend for the World Series, so the team was a bit ahead of schedule by some estimates) and they wanted Andrus to have a season under his belt before then. So despite never playing in Triple-A, Andrus was promoted to the big leagues and handed the role of starting shortstop.

RANGERS POSITION OUTLOOK
Jan. 23: Catcher
Jan. 24: First base
Jan. 25: Second base
Jan. 26: Third base
Jan. 27: Shortstop
Jan. 30: Left field
Jan. 31: Center field
Feb. 1: Right field
Feb. 2: DH/Utility
Feb. 3: Bench
Feb. 6: No. 1 starter
Feb. 7: No. 2 starter
Feb. 8: No. 3 starter
Feb. 9: No. 4 starter
Feb. 10: No. 5 starter
Feb. 13: Middle/long relief
Feb. 14: Late-inning relief
Feb. 15: Coaches
Feb. 16: Manager
Feb. 17: Front office
He was nearly the rookie of the year in 2009 (finishing second to Oakland's Andrew Bailey). He stole 33 bases, made highlight-reel plays at short and managed to hit .267 with 40 RBIs in 145 games. He led all rookies in games played, hits, runs, total bases, triples and stolen bases. In other words: Andrus exceeded expectations.

He had 22 errors that first season and one focus was cleaning up the mental mistakes on easier plays. Andrus could make the impossible look easy, but at times would make the easy look impossible. Many of those errors were bad throws. He dropped the total to 16 in 2010 but saw it rise to 25. Errors aren't the only way to measure fielding and can certainly be misleading, but the bottom line is a player of Andrus' caliber shouldn't have that many errors in the field. The only player with more errors in 2011 was Orioles 1B/3B Mark Reynolds. In fairness, it should be pointed out that Andrus' range means he gets to balls that others can't, meaning those balls can turn into errors while for other shortstops they are just hits. But Andrus knows that part of his game must improve.

Andrus played well in August, batting over .300, and it appeared he was ready to go into the postseason on a roll. But the 23-year-old hit just .235 in the 2011 playoffs with one stolen base, one RBI and 10 runs scored. He did save his best play for the World Series, with multi-hit games in Games 3, 4 and 6. But he had seven strikeouts to one walk and overall in the postseason wasn't on base as much as he would like.

Still, Andrus is a big spark plug in the lineup. Manager Ron Washington has insisted on batting him second in large part because the Ian Kinsler-Andrus combination puts a ton of pressure on the opponent right away, having to get a couple of speed guys out. But Andrus can also bunt, move runners over and make contact. That allows Washington many options after Kinsler gets on base.

Andrus has plenty of skill and should continue to improve. He enters a new part of his major league service time now, becoming an arbitration-eligible player for the first time this offseason. But sides have exchanged figures (they are not quite $1 million apart) and hope to come to an agreement to avoid a hearing. It means that Andrus can be a free agent after the 2014 season. Scott Boras is Andrus' agent, BTW.

But the Rangers head into 2012 with a shortstop who now has three years of experience and is focused on improving.

SPONSORED HEADLINES

TEAM LEADERS

BA LEADER
Adrian Beltre
BA HR RBI R
.323 18 71 75
OTHER LEADERS
HRA. Beltre 18
RBIA. Beltre 71
RA. Beltre 75
OPSA. Beltre .876
WC. Lewis 10
ERAC. Lewis 5.12
SOY. Darvish 182