Ten(ish) Questions With... WR Ogletree

October, 10, 2013
10/10/13
10:20
AM ET
Each week during the season, we'll chat with a different Detroit Lions player or coach for a look at their lives on and off the field in a feature called "Ten(ish) Questions With..."

Previous Ten (ish) Questions subjects: TE Brandon Pettigrew; DT Justin Bannan; WR Kris Durham; C Dominic Raiola

Wide receiver Kevin Ogletree is one of the newest Lions, having signed with the team a week ago after being released from Tampa Bay.

It’s been a lot of change for Ogletree over the past year, going from Dallas to Tampa Bay and now to Detroit, but as you’ll learn in this week’s Ten(ish) Questions, it might have been harder on another member of his family.

Ogletree had two catches for 20 yards in his first game with Detroit and we caught up with him to chat about the smell of football and how his dog helped with a formation.

We’ll start with a football question: What’s your favorite football memory, high school, college, pro?

Kevin Ogletree: My favorite moment ever, that first time playing football in pads as a kid. The smell, everything was so brand new to me. It was like finding something you love to do, it was a passion I didn’t know about. That was probably the most.

How old were you?

[+] EnlargeKevin Ogletree
Harry How/Getty ImagesKevin Ogletree had two catches for 20 yards in his Lions debut.
KO: 11. 10 years old.

So smell, what would that be?

KO: It’s a football smell, man. It’s a good smell. But it’s like the grass. It’s the sweat. It’s the helmets. It’s pretty disgusting. But it’s definitely a part of it.

When you look away from football, what’s the one thing that gets you going?

KO: I’m a pet owner. I love my dog. I have an English Bulldog who just keeps me smiling and happy all the time. But he’s not here now so it’s like, study your playbook. It was kind of helpful.

Male? Female?

KO: He’s a boy. He’s going to be four years old. His name is Beans.

Beans?

KO: Well, Beans is his last name. His first name is Cluster because early on in Dallas, I had a problem with that formation, it was a cluster bunch formation so I named my dog Cluster so I could remember that formation. It never gave me a problem after that.

That might be the oddest way to name a pet ever.

KO: Yeah, but it helped me. And I’m serious about that. It was a formation that was giving me trouble. Once I named my dog that, I never had to think about it again. I know exactly where I’m at.
So how did you get Cluster Beans? A pound?

KO: No. I got him from a breeder in Richardson (Texas). It was like 30, 40 minutes away from where I stayed.

Was that your first dog?

KO: No, I’ve been a dog owner my whole life. Not me going to get it but my family always kept a dog. I’ve always loved dogs, man.

What was your childhood dog?

KO: I had a Rottweiler. Her name was Nijah. That was my childhood dog. I’ve got a spot right here [on his lip], I don’t know if you can see it, but she bit me right here. Never stopped loving her, though.

How old were you when you got bit?

KO: I was young, man. Just in her face, she was laying down on me and she just snapped at me. Can you still see that? Can you see it?

A little bit.

KO: Yeah, so Nijah. Had P.J., Gizmo. I’m not going to get into the sad stories to what happened to them.

Are any of them alive?

KO: No.

So, where is Cluster Beans?

KO: He’s in Tampa with some friends of the family. Just waiting to get to me. He’s traveling, man. He’s had a very hectic six months.

When does he get up here?

KO: We’ll see. He can’t fly, so.

So bye week?

KO: Bye week go get him, maybe have someone drive with me.

Wait, why can’t he fly?

KO: Just they don’t trust all their health issues. They have such small, he’s got a deal where he has a small esophagus. He’s got breathing problems where his lungs don’t, just look it up. Bulldogs are the worst when it comes to health issues. Had to get him health insurance and all that. He’s like a child. No children, but he’s the closest thing to it.

Michael Rothstein | email

ESPN Detroit Lions reporter

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