Three halftime thoughts from Lions-Vikings

December, 29, 2013
12/29/13
2:22
PM ET
MINNEAPOLIS -- Some thoughts from the first half of the Detroit Lions' season finale, where they trail the Minnesota Vikings, 7-0.

Draft a wide receiver: The Lions clearly need one as the non-Calvin Johnson offense had no players who could get open, and could not move the ball at all. It just showed, again, how critical Johnson is to the Detroit offense. It's an offense that often talked about how many playmakers it had between Johnson, Reggie Bush, Joique Bell and Matthew Stafford. Yet without Johnson, the Lions were capable of nothing on offense. Not a thing. So, perhaps wide receiver leaps cornerback as the position of biggest need for Detroit.

No passion: Maybe this shouldn’t be surprising, as all season long the Lions have talked and talked without having any positive action to back it up. Nothing changed in the last game of the season. After talking about how they needed to win this game and weren’t going to pack it in, the offense mustered 56 yards in the first half. The defense allowed 241 yards, and the same issues continued -- dropped passes, penalties and some odd play calling. The one thing that hasn’t happened yet is a turnover. The best Lions' player in the first half might have been Sam Martin, who punted well in the dome.

The Metrodome is a cool place: Between the giveaway promotions, a fantastic music selection, and a loud fan base getting excited at everything, this feels like a fitting closing to a pretty fun place to watch a football game. They also had a bunch of tributes here in the first half on the video board, which were more exciting than most of what happened on the field in the first half. In a world where so many stadiums are overly generic, this dome has a bit of character.

Michael Rothstein | email

ESPN Detroit Lions reporter

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