Morning Roar: Enough about the hat

February, 18, 2014
Feb 18
8:30
AM ET
Good Morning and ROOOOAAARRR!!!!

It has come up with other quarterbacks around the league and now Matthew Stafford is being criticized again for wearing his hat backwards, this time by former Bears coach Mike Ditka in the Detroit Free Press.

Just stop. Seriously. Right now. Equating how someone wears their baseball cap to leadership is misguided at best and living in an alternate reality at worst.

It is called fashion, not a matter of how a team will follow you. If a team is looking up to a player even in part because of how he wears his hat, or if he wears a hat or a bolo or a fedora or a bowler or a Cosby sweater, then that team is going to have many more problems and much bigger leader/follower issues than a football team should have.

So let's stop with this criticism. Sometimes the way you wear a hat just happens to be how you wear a hat. Nothing more. Nothing less. Does appearance sometimes matter? Sure. But this is football here, an athletic activity played for big money, not a summit of world leaders discussing how to save the planet or stop wars. Then again, even the President of the United States has been photographed -- gasp -- wearing his hat turned around.

Perhaps the concerns with Stafford should be directed more to things that actually matter in the realm of football, like his footwork and accuracy and ability to be a strong offensive leader now that Nate Burleson, one of the team's biggest offensive voices, is heading off to another team.

Then again, Burleson wore his hat backwards as well from time to time, so maybe the whole issue with the Lions and their inability to reach a Super Bowl has been how they wear their hats. Instead of their actual play on the field over the past half-century.

And now, a look at Lions news from around the Interwebs:

Michael Rothstein | email

ESPN Detroit Lions reporter

SPONSORED HEADLINES

Comments

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, photo & other personal information you make public on Facebook will appear with your comment, and may be used on ESPN's media platforms. Learn more.


Insider