Endurance: USA Pro Cycling Challenge

Domestic teams relish USA Pro Challenge

August, 20, 2013
8/20/13
3:08
PM ET
USA Pro Cycling ChallengeChris Graythen/Getty ImagesThe USA Pro Cycling Challenge field is crowded, but domestic teams are hopeful.
ASPEN, Colo. -- You would think this would be it for the domestic squads -- the time to strike, the pressure at its highest, management pressing down upon riders for results.

But, at least according to a few of the smaller teams here in Colorado at the USA Pro Challenge, you’d be wrong.

To a man, the domestic teams are outgunned by the larger teams here: Garmin-Sharps, BMC Racing, Sky. The eyeballs are on them here more than any other time, increasing sponsor wants and the need to leave impressions on a short-attention-spanned cycling collective.

But pressure doesn’t always equal results, so the managers of the smaller-budget teams are keeping it calm in Colorado, at least publicly.

“I don’t think it helps to put a lot of pressure on ourselves. This is a really difficult race with some stiff competition. But we want to have an impact on the race. We want to make our mark on the race,” said Optum-Kelly Benefit Strategies director Jonas Carney.

“So there’s some pressure, especially on these sprint stages. It is nice to kind of come into a race where we can kind of swing at the fences and not be expected to contest the overall.”

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Christian Vande VeldeDoug Pensinger/Getty ImagesChristian Vande Velde races this week for the first time since serving a doping suspension that was reduced to six months in exchange for cooperation with the USADA's case against Lance Armstrong.
Veteran Christian Vande Velde is one of three Garmin-Sharp riders who will start this week's Tour of Catalunya in Spain, their first race since serving doping suspensions that were reduced in exchange for cooperation with the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency's case against Lance Armstrong. Vande Velde, 36, of Lemont, Ill., signed with the U.S. Postal Service team before the 1998 season and rode in support of Armstrong at the Tour de France in 1999 and 2001. He subsequently competed for two European-based teams before joining the Garmin organization in 2008, and finished fourth at that year's Tour.

In 2010, Vande Velde was among numerous witnesses interviewed by federal investigators then gathering evidence in a criminal investigation of organized doping on the Postal team. Last year, he and 10 other former Postal riders gave sworn testimony, including their own admissions to performance-enhancing drug use, that collectively formed a crucial and compelling part of USADA's case.

The five riders who were active at the time received six-month suspensions and had some past results nullified. Armstrong's longtime teammate George Hincapie has retired. Levi Leipheimer was fired by his Omega-Pharma-Quick Step team and remains unsigned. Vande Velde, David Zabriskie and Tom Danielson, whose suspensions ended March 1, will compete at Cataluyna this week. It marks the beginning of what Vande Velde says will be his final professional season. His tentative schedule includes the Giro d'Italia, the Tour de France and the USA Pro Cycling Challenge in Colorado, a race he won last year in dramatic fashion in a time trial on the last day.

Vande Velde spent much of his suspension in suburban Chicago with wife Leah and daughters Uma, 5, and Madeline, 4. He also trained by himself (and occasionally with Zabriskie) in Southern California, where he struggled emotionally. "It finally dawned on me that I really enjoy this, and I'm really thankful I have my health and have the opportunity to race at the highest level cycling has to offer,'" he told ESPN.com in a telephone interview Saturday from Girona, Spain.

"I don't want pity from anyone. That's my biggest fear of saying these kinds of things, and that is the farthest thing from the truth. I'm just saying what I was going through. There were plenty of times when I questioned what I was doing at this stage of my career and why I was doing this. I definitely stumbled for a while there."

The following are excerpts from Vande Velde's conversation with ESPN.com.

What have the last six months been like?

[+] EnlargeChristian Vande Velde
Garrett W. Ellwood/Getty ImagesVande Velde considered retiring after winning last year's USA Pro Cycling Challenge but "didn't want to go away and hide after everything that came out."
It's been hard. I'm not going to lie. And I didn't foresee a lot of the things that would be hard. Like, for example, a training camp in November-December that a lot of times I didn't want to go to. I've been at a training camp at that point in time for the last 20 years of my life. Having that gaping hole there and not being retired, it blindsided me. I know I'm going to race this year, that'll come, and I wasn't freaking out about that. But it was definitely being away from the team, having that communication like I always have, that was hard, much more than I thought it would be.

I put myself out there and did quite a few public speaking [engagements] and it was all met really well. I was happy to do it, too, because there aren't too many questions I get asked now that I can't answer honestly. [Editor's note: USADA still has pending cases against former Postal director Johan Bruyneel and other staff members that could involve evidence from riders.] I enjoyed it, and I think most of the people I spoke to enjoyed it too. That was a different side that I didn't foresee being so positive.

I spoke to the Challenged Athletes Foundation [charity ride] three or four days after [USADA's evidence] was announced. That was one that I was pretty scared about, in all honesty. Of course people threw some hard questions out there and I addressed them. I definitely made it so that I wasn't that elephant in the room: "Come up and ask me, I don't want you to be avoiding me.'"

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