Mailbag: Talking injury prevention & more

June, 14, 2014
Jun 14
8:00
AM ET
Each week, I will ask for questions via Twitter with the hashtag #PackersMail and then will deliver the answers over the weekend.

Demovsky: Coach Mike McCarthy appears to have curtailed the number of team (11-on-11 periods) during the offseason workouts. There has been a greater focus on fundamental periods in the OTAs that have been open to the media. Whether that's an effort to decrease injuries or simply to focus more on teaching is not clear. McCarthy also has been secretive about how the Packers are gathering the data and what they plan to do with it. All we know is that they're working with Catapult Sports, which uses GPS monitoring to help prevent fatigue injuries, for the first time ever. Demovsky: Rajion Neal, the undrafted rookie from Tennessee, has not gotten a lot of opportunities in team periods. However, even if he had, it's tough to tell much about any running back in practices without pads. We'll get a much better feel for Neal in August, when the pads come on. Also, because the Packers won't want to expose Eddie Lacy, James Starks and DuJuan Harris to much hitting, expect Neal to get a fair amount of work in the preseason games. @RobDemovsky Which rookie WR for the @packers do you project to have the most successful season statistically? #PackersMail Demovsky: I said shortly after the draft that I thought Jared Abbrederis could be the sleeper in the Packers' draft. Not that I don't think second-round receiver Davante Adams could make an impact, but Abbrederis could find a home as a slot receiver, which would free up Randall Cobb to move around more. Demovsky: Evan Dietrich-Smith's best attribute is that he's a fighter; he goes hard all the time, so much so that the Packers were concerned about his ability to hold up with that style over the course of an entire season. Physically, however, EDS has his limitations, and they often show up in the running game. 

Rob Demovsky

ESPN Green Bay Packers reporter

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