Crosby not sweating longer extra point

April, 15, 2014
4/15/14
12:15
PM ET
GREEN BAY, Wis. -- Don't count Mason Crosby among the NFL kickers outraged over the potential change on extra points.

Unlike some veteran kickers, including his NFC North counterpart in Chicago, who have voiced their displeasure over the possible change that would call for PATs to essentially become 38-yard field goals, the long-time Green Bay Packers kicker doesn't sound too bothered by it.

Crosby
"For me, I don't really have a strong opinion about it," said Crosby, who has missed just two of 350 career extra points. “It's for them to decide. I don't think it really matters. Obviously we did what we needed to do and made kicks. So they're looking at that and saying, 'You made so many kicks, let's look at an adjustment to make it more difficult.'"

Crosby said the offensive linemen who block on PATs might have a bigger problem with it.

"We've got some guys who are a little outspoken so maybe Josh Sitton and T.J. [Lang] and those guys might say something if it gets a little rough going back and forth," Crosby said. "You score inside the 10, you have to go back to the 20."

For now, the longer extra point is only on experimental basis after teams agreed last month to a two-game trial in the first two weeks of the preseason.

"The extra points, I think we're going to try that out in the preseason and see how it goes," Crosby said. "If we keep making all the extra points, who knows what they decide on? For us, we'll just start practicing that kick. It's just kind of a change of distance, a change of look. But we'll just practice it like we do any other extra point and go out and execute it if that rule gets changed."

Crosby is coming off the best season of his seven-year NFL career. He followed his worst season by making 33 of 37 regular-season field goals, including all eight from 30-39 yards. For his career, he has made 78.7 percent of his field goals, including 86.6 percent from 30-39 yards.

Rob Demovsky

ESPN Green Bay Packers reporter

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