Green Bay Packers: Ty Detmer

GREEN BAY, Wis. -- When the Green Bay Packers announced last week that they would open up Lambeau Field to fans for Brett Favre's induction into the Packers Hall of Fame, former team president Bob Harlan offered a glimpse into what this summer's ceremony might entail.

"We have featured people coming in to participate in the ceremony," said Harlan, who now serves on the Hall of Fame's board of directors. "To say it's going to be a historic evening when you see the people who are going to be here, you can't say enough about how historic it is."

The guest list is typically left up to the inductee, but it's safe to say plenty of Favre's old coaches and teammates will be present.

In fact, the invitations for the July 18 event already have gone out.

Thanks to Indianapolis Colts backup quarterback Matt Hasselbeck, who began his career as one of Favre’s understudies, we can see exactly what the invites look like:



In a telephone interview, Hasselbeck said he will do everything in his power to make it back for the event and expects many of Favre's former teammates to do the same.

"I think there's just a lot of respect for certain things, and that's a dead time in our offseason," said Hasselbeck, who spent three seasons (1998-00) in Green Bay. "Aside from some family commitment that I don't know about yet, I'm going to do everything in my power to be there. I think it's really cool. Thanks to Brett for [the invitation]."

Hasselbeck was one of several quarterbacks the Packers drafted, developed and then traded away during Favre's 16 years with the team. The list also includes Ty Detmer, Mark Brunell and Aaron Brooks. Hasselbeck, a sixth-round pick in 1998, said he actually became closer with Favre after the Packers traded him to the Seattle Seahawks in 2001.

"My first year, Brett was still a wild man," Hasselbeck recalled. "That second year he was trying to quit drinking and then the third year he did, so that third year it was a totally different experience. All those other guys that Brett had been with -- Chewy [Mark Chmura] and Frankie [Winters] -- were gone."

Like Favre, Hasselbeck got his first chance to start under coach Mike Holmgren, who left the Packers after the 1998 seasons to coach the Seahawks.

"When I left, Brett was really, really helpful," Hasselbeck said. "It was really hard for me that first year in Seattle. I had gotten hurt. I essentially got benched for Trent Dilfer and Holmgren was so, so hard on me. The only thing that gave me hope was that I knew that Holmgren had been harder on Brett. So I can remember phone calls with him [talking] about that."

Hasselbeck said he was on the fringes of Favre's inner circle during his time in Green Bay.

"I did Thanksgiving with the Favres and Christmas with the Favres, but it was probably Chewy, Frankie and Deanna [Favre] that got me the invite," Hasselbeck said. "And I was probably closer in age to Brett's daughter, Brittany. When I'd do Thanksgiving over there, I'd end up playing Battleship with Brittany while everyone else sat around watching football."
GREEN BAY, Wis. -- The Green Bay Packers would like to get back in the business of drafting and developing quarterbacks.

North Dakota State's Brock Jensen could be just the quarterback to start with.

The native of nearby Waupaca, Wis., worked out for the Packers this week, his agent Brian Adkins confirmed Friday.

Adkins said scouts have told him they project Jensen could be a mid- to late-round draft pick, although neither Mel Kiper Jr. nor Todd McShay had Jensen in the latest version of their top-10 quarterback prospects.

The 6-foot-3, 225-pound Jensen led North Dakota State to a third straight FCS title as a senior last season.

He finished with a 47-5 record as a starter, making him the winningest quarterback in FCS history.

"I have no doubt in my mind he could be a player a few years down the road that we're talking about as the quarterback in this draft," Adkins said.

Jensen has two more visits scheduled for next week, with the Cleveland Browns and Cincinnati Bengals, Adkins said.

"Cincinnati has shown the strongest interest," Adkins said. "They sent their quarterbacks coach to his workout and took him out to dinner. But it was great to see Green Bay bring him in."

The Packers typically use their pre-draft visits to look at late-round picks or potential undrafted free agents. Earlier this week, they had Virginia center Luke Bowanko in for a visit.

The Packers have three quarterbacks in the fold -- Aaron Rodgers, Scott Tolzien and Matt Flynn (who agreed to terms on a new contract this week) -- but would like to add a fourth prospect, coach Mike McCarthy said last month at the NFL annual meetings.

Since 2008, when general manager Ted Thompson drafted Flynn (seventh round) and Brian Brohm (second round), the Packers have drafted only one quarterback (B.J. Coleman, seventh round in 2012).

Thompson's mentor, former Packers general manager Ron Wolf, made a habit of drafting quarterbacks, developing and eventually trading them. In the 1990s, the Packers drafted Ty Detmer (ninth round, 1992), Mark Brunell (fifth round, 1993), Matt Hasselbeck (sixth round, 1998) and Aaron Brooks (fourth round, 1999).
INDIANAPOLIS -- The Green Bay Packers would like to get back into the business of developing young quarterbacks like they did throughout the 1990s -- when Ty Detmer, Mark Brunell, Matt Hasselbeck and Aaron Brooks all came up through their system.

The problem is, this isn't the 1990s.

The rules of the collective bargaining agreement that was put in place following the 2011 lockout greatly reduced the amount of time coaches can work with players in the offseason, a time often set aside for individual and group instruction. For Packers' quarterbacks, that means four weeks have been shaved off coach Mike McCarthy's quarterback school.

Nevertheless, the Packers have come to the NFL scouting combine with one eye on finding a developmental quarterback prospect and hope to take four quarterbacks into training camp this summer.

"I think we definitely need four," McCarthy said at the combine, "So I'm hopeful that we can get a young guy in the draft."

The Packers have only two quarterbacks under contract for 2014 -- starter Aaron Rodgers and Scott Tolzien, who was signed to the practice squad last September and then promoted to the active roster after Rodgers broke his collarbone on Nov. 4. Tolzien has yet to go through an offseason in McCarthy's training program, having been with the San Francisco 49ers for his first two seasons.

Matt Flynn was re-signed last November and became the fourth quarterback to start for the Packers last season, but his contract was only for the 2013 season.

"I thought Matt Flynn came in and did a number of good things," McCarthy said. "There's a lot of stability he brings to the quarterback room as far as the role that he needs to play and his role to the starting quarterback to help them scout and so forth, so Matt is obviously a good fit for our program. I thought he definitely gave us a shot in the arm when we needed it. Free agency is upon us, we'll see what happens."

Whatever happens, the Packers don't want to be stuck in the position they were in at the end of last summer, when the trio of Vince Young, Graham Harrell and B.J. Coleman all failed to win the backup job, forcing the Packers to sign veteran Seneca Wallace the week of the season opener.

That general manager Ted Thompson has drafted only one quarterback -- Coleman in the seventh round in 2012 -- since he took Brian Brohm (second round) and Flynn (seventh round) in 2008 would seemingly indicate that it's time to take another one.

"We're always looking," Thompson said. "Coach McCarthy's a quarterback guy. He likes to have a group, so you never stop looking, turning over rocks, that sort of thing."

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