Boost Mobile Elite 24 Nicknames Revisited

September, 21, 2011
9/21/11
3:32
PM ET
At this year's Boost Mobile Elite 24, the Marques Johnson squad rolled to a 142-132 victory over the Raymond Lewis squad behind the play of Virginia recruit Justin Anderson of Montrose Christian (Rockville, Md.) and recent UCLA commit Kyle Anderson of defending POWERADE FAB 50 mythical national champion St. Anthony (Jersey City, N.J.).

Nobody will remember the score as time passes, but besides the broken backboard caused by Mitch McGary of Brewster Academy (Wolfeboro, Mass.) in pre-game warm ups, the most memorable aspect of the event is, an will continue to be, the streetball nicknames earned by the players.

This year's streetball handles were given out by Duke Tango, the original voice of the The Entertainers Basketball Classic (EBC) held at Harlem's Rucker Park, and streetball entrepreneur Bobbito Garcia.

Outside of the nicknames game MVP's Justin Anderson aka "Slow-Mo" and Aquille Carr aka "The Crime Stopper" came to Venice Beach with, below are the nicknames handed out by Tango and Garcia, with a couple thrown in by the ESPNHS basketball staff!

2011 Boost Mobile Elite 24 Nicknames

Justin Anderson aka "The Prime Objective" aka "Sinista"

Kyle Anderson aka "Sinatra"

Brandon Ashley aka “East Bay Funk”

Anthony Bennett aka "The Barbarian"

Nate Britt aka "Nate the Skate"

Savon Goodman aka “The Rule Breaker” aka “Go Get It"

Rodney Purvis aka "Runnin' Rod"

Aquille Carr aka "Calling All Cars"

Robert Carter aka "The Animal"

DaJuan Coleman aka "Upstate" aka "Big Baby"

Aaron Harrison aka "Ice"

Andrew Harrison aka "Magic" aka "The Table Setter"

Grant Jerrett aka "G"

Mitch McGary aka "White Thunder" aka “Show stopper” aka "Unbreakable" aka "Full Metal Jacket"

Nerlens Noel aka “Eraserhead” aka “The Eraser” aka “The 7-foot Leprechaun” aka "No No No No No"

Shabazz Muhammad aka "The Real Deal" aka "Nice And Nasty Bazz"

Julius Randle aka "The Jewels" aka "Much To Handle"

Rasheed Sulaimon aka "Sheeeeeed"

Gabe York aka "Yo Yo"

Some of the nicknames handed out by Tango are already the handle of well known players. There is no need to explain the origins of “Magic” and “Big Baby,” but below are the original names behind some of the handles given out this year:

“Prime Objective” Lonnie Harrell -- The former Eastern (Washington, D.C.) standout is a 6-foot-7 guard who earned a scholarship to play for John Thompson at Georgetown. He finished his eligibility at Northeastern and has made stops in the ABA, USBL, IBL, and NBDL.

“Animal” Richie Adams -- From now defunct basketball factory Ben Franklin (Harlem, N.Y.), Adams was one of two bookend high school All-Americans for a 1979-80 Franklin team (the other was Gary Springer) that spent a majority of that season ranked No. 1 in the country by Basketball Weekly. They were shocked by Stevenson (Bronx, N.Y.) in overtime of the PSAL semifinals, 65-63. Adams got his equivalency degree and matriculated to a junior college in Massachusetts before finishing his college career at UNLV. The 6-foot-9 left-handed shot-blocking phenom was twice named conference player of the year for the Runnin’ Rebels, but a severe drug problem ruined not only is career, but his life.

“Ice” Jerry Reynolds -- A 1980-81 prep All-American at Alexander Hamilton (Brooklyn, N.Y,), Reynolds was a 6-foot-8 wing who earned a scholarship to play for Dale Brown at LSU. He first attended Madison Tech Junior College in Wisconsin and developed into the No. 22 pick of the 1985 NBA Draft by the Milwaukee Bucks. He spent eight years in the NBA and is semi-famous for being the beneficiary of Scott Skiles' record-breaking 30th assist in a single game during the 1990-91 season and for coining the term “24/7” (as his jump shot was good “24/7”).

“The Skate” Nate Archibald -- In the NBA, the DeWitt Clinton (Bronx, N.Y.) product was known as “Tiny,” the man who ran the point for the 1981 NBA champ Celtics and the only player to lead the league in points and assists in the same season. On the playgrounds, Archibald was known as “The Skate,” the man who returned to Rucker Park (the original home of the Boost Mobile Elite 24) every summer even after he made it to the big-time. Archibald almost never made it, as academic troubles nearly derailed his prep career. He straightened things out by his senior season, when he was named all-city for a 21-0 team that won a mythical national championship. Archibald went the JUCO route and kept improving his game to the point where he was named one of the NBA’s 50 Greatest Players in 1996.

Don't forget to follow Ronnie Flores on Twitter: @RonFloresESPN

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