High-SchoolGirl: Girls' Soccer

Six girls in running for Gatorade AOY

July, 10, 2012
7/10/12
9:49
AM ET
Gatorade POY girlsSusan Goldman/Gatorade

Six outstanding girls are finalists for the 10th annual Gatorade Female High School Athlete of the Year Award. The winner will be announced on Tuesday in Los Angeles (ESPN3, 9:40 p.m. EDT) and will be recognized at the ESPYS the following evening.

Each of the contenders has already been honored as National Player of the Year in her respective sport.

Here are the finalists:

Volleyball: Jordan Burgess, Berkeley Prep (Tampa, Fla.)

Cross country: Molly Seidel, University Lake School (Hartland, Wis.)

Basketball: Breanna Stewart, Cicero-North Syracuse (Syracuse, N.Y.)

Soccer: Morgan Andrews, Milford (N.H.)

Softball: Geri Ann Glasco, Oconee County (Watkinsville, Ga.)

Track & Field: Shelbi Vaughan, Legacy (Mansfield, Texas)

Read the full story here.

World Cup hero Ali Krieger surprises POY

May, 24, 2012
5/24/12
1:34
PM ET
Gatorade POY, Morgan Andrews, Milford, New Hampshire, girlsSusan Goldman/GatoradeWomen's World Cup hero Ali Krieger surprises Gatorade National Girls Soccer Player of the Year Morgan Andrews with the trophy.
MILFORD, N.H. -- She’s been considered one of America’s elite young soccer talents since her preteen years, but Morgan Andrews put a little space between herself and the rest of the field Thursday when she was named the 2011-12 Gatorade National Girls Soccer Player of the Year.

Andrews was surprised with the news in her Milford (N.H.) English class by a hero of the 2011 FIFA Women’s World Cup, Ali Krieger, who earned Gatorade Virginia Player of the Year honors in 2002-03.

“I can’t believe this is happening,” said Andrews, who turned 17 on March 25. “I owe so much to so many for this. I wouldn’t be here without the love and support of this incredible, amazing community. I’m literally shaking. I just don’t believe it.”

Read the complete story here.

40 greatest female athletes: Marta

May, 24, 2012
5/24/12
8:54
AM ET
MartaLars Baron/Getty ImagesMarta has become a full-fledged superstar in soccer-mad South America, where the women's game has long struggled to make inroads.
ESPN is marking the 40th anniversary of Title IX by unveiling the top 40 female athletes of the past 40 years.

American midfielder Leslie Osborne still remembers the first time she saw the No. 22 woman in ESPN's countdown play.

Marta, as she was simply known, was only 16 at the 2002 Under-19 Women's World Cup, but she already was special enough to leave an impression.

"She had qualities I had never seen before in other female players," Osborne recalls.

Still just 26, Marta already has gone on to be a five-time FIFA World Player of the Year (2006-10). She has netted 80 goals in 72 games for Brazil, and was the leading scorer in Women's Professional Soccer during each of her three seasons.

Read the complete story from espnW here.

Earlier in this series:
No. 40: Diver Fu Mingxia
No. 39: Jockey Julie Krone
No. 38: Gymnast Mary Lou Retton
No. 37: Hockey player Cammi Granato
No. 36: Soccer player Kristine Lilly
No. 35: Basketball player Diana Taurasi
No 34: Volleyball player Flo Hyman
No. 33: Soccer player Abby Wambach
No. 32: Swimmer Mary T. Meagher
No. 31: Marathoner Joan Benoit
No. 30: Sprinter Gail Devers
No. 29: Basketball player Nancy Lieberman
No. 28: Marathoner Grete Waitz
No. 27: Soccer player Michelle Akers
No. 26: Basketball player Chamique Holdsclaw
No. 25: Swimmer Dara Torres
No. 24: Golfer Nancy Lopez
No. 23: Swimmer Tracy Caulkins
Michelle AkersAP Photo/John T. GreilickMichelle Akers hung up her cleats knowing that the sport was in good hands on the home front with stars Mia Hamm, Brandi Chastain, Julie Foudy and Kristine Lilly.
ESPN is marking the 40th anniversary of Title IX by unveiling the top 40 female athletes of the past 40 years.

She was a four-time All-American at Central Florida. She scored 105 goals in 153 appearances for the U.S. She earned the Golden Boot as the leading scorer at the 1991 Women's World Cup. She won a gold medal at the 1996 Olympic Summer Games and another World Cup in 1999. She was voted FIFA Woman Player of the Century, alongside China's Sun Wen. And in 2004, she was one of two women on Pele's list of the 125 greatest living players.

But you might not have heard of Michelle Akers, No. 27 in ESPN's countdown.

"She was one of the greatest players ever, but kids now don't necessarily know who she was because there was so much less exposure back then," former U.S. star Julie Foudy says. "The game was really just starting with her."

Read the complete story from espnW here.

Earlier in this series:
No. 40: Diver Fu Mingxia
No. 39: Jockey Julie Krone
No. 38: Gymnast Mary Lou Retton
No. 37: Hockey player Cammi Granato
No. 36: Soccer player Kristine Lilly
No. 35: Basketball player Diana Taurasi
No 34: Volleyball player Flo Hyman
No. 33: Soccer player Abby Wambach
No. 32: Swimmer Mary T. Meagher
No. 31: Marathoner Joan Benoit
No. 30: Sprinter Gail Devers
No. 29: Basketball player Nancy Lieberman
No. 28: Marathoner Grete Waitz
Abby WambachRobert Michael/AFP/Getty ImagesAbby Wambach has a fearless mentality that has produced big wins at every level.
ESPN is marking the 40th anniversary of Title IX by unveiling the top 40 female athletes of the past 40 years.

Even as a 16-year-old, Abby Wambach seemed destined for stardom.

"You could see the qualities we all know today," says April Heinrichs, who coached Wambach on a junior national team before taking over the U.S. senior national team from 2000 to 2005. "She was great in the air, and she was a winner."

Today, the soccer star, who is No. 33 in the ESPN countdown, has scored 134 goals for Team USA, second all-time on the international stage, behind Mia Hamm's 158.

But what really has set Wambach apart over the years is how she elevates her game at crunch time.

"I've never seen her intimidated by anyone," Heinrichs says, "or by any challenge."

Read the complete story from espnW here.

Earlier in this series:
No. 40: Diver Fu Mingxia
No. 39: Jockey Julie Krone
No. 38: Gymnast Mary Lou Retton
No. 37: Hockey player Cammi Granato
No. 36: Soccer player Kristine Lilly
No. 35: Basketball player Diana Taurasi
No 34: Volleyball player Flo Hyman
Kristine LillyJed Jacobsohn/Getty ImagesKristine Lilly, who is only 5-foot-4, simply wore out opponents with her tenacity.
ESPN is marking the 40th anniversary of Title IX by unveiling the top 40 female athletes of the past 40 years.

Kristine Lillywas only a teenager when she got called up to the U.S. women's soccer team. By the time she retired when she was 39, she had made a record 352 appearances for the national team, played in five FIFA Women's World Cups, and played in three Olympics, winning gold in 1996 and 2004.

But perhaps more than anything else, it was her work ethic that separated her from her teammates and opponents. Lilly, the No. 36 player in ESPN's countdown, developed that work ethic early in life. She would return home from her time with the national team and embark on lengthy runs through the snow and wind in Wilton, Conn.

"Kristine just wore players out," says Tony DiCicco, coach for the U.S. from 1990-99.

Read the full story from espnW here.

Earlier in this series:
No. 40: Diver Fu Mingxia
No. 39: Jockey Julie Krone
No. 38: Gymnast Mary Lou Retton
No. 37: Hockey player Cammi Granato
Plenty of high school athletes face demanding travel schedules, but these girls' soccer players take it to the extreme.

They have traveled through mountains, deserts and multiple feet of snow. They've crossed state lines, broken speed limits and racked up thousands of dollars in gas expenses. But in the end, every one of them says the travel is worth it. Every one of them says they'd do it again.

-- Desire, dad drive Bishop Carroll (Wichita, Kan.) senior Keighton Allen to weekly practice 190 miles away. Click here to read more.

-- Players cross state lines just to play with Birmingham United. Click here to read more.

-- Meg O’Brien, a junior at Northland Prep (Flagstaff, Ariz.), journeys through desert, mountain and valley for her club team. Click here to read more.

-- Laura Rayfield and Laura Moore attend rival high schools in Washington, but sing away when they carpool to club pracitces. Click here to read more.
Jane LevyCourtesy of ABCBefore her breakout role on ABC's hit sitcom "Suburgatory," Jane Levy was a star soccer player for Sir Francis Drake (Marin County, Calif.) High and Goucher College.
Like many suburban kids, Jane Levy began playing soccer at age 5 because, well, that’s what Mom signed her up for. But the star of ABC’s new hit “Suburgatory” -- who also just landed the lead female role in the "Evil Dead" film remake -- got such a kick out of the sport that she continued to play it into college. Manning everything from defender to forward (for two minutes) to right midfielder, Jane competed for both a club team (Novato) and Sir Francis Drake (Marin County, Calif.) High, where she was named captain her senior year. She made varsity at Division III Goucher College in Baltimore, but left before her sophomore season to pursue acting in New York. Though she hasn’t set foot on a checkered ball since, the 23-year-old channels her soccer days to be a team player on the set. --Interview by Cristina Goyanes

ESPNHS: Was there a point in your life, before you started acting, that you thought you could reach the highest level of soccer?

Jane Levy: I wasn't naturally talented, but I worked so hard and committed myself 100 percent. I enjoyed the process of training, learning and hanging out with my teammates.

ESPNHS: Did you attend soccer camp?

Jane Levy soccer
Courtesy of Jane LevyLevy competed for both a club team (Novato) and Sir Francis Drake (Marin County, Calif.) High, where she was named captain her senior year.
JL: Yes, a two-week camp. I miss the smell of freshly cut grass and being up too early. It was such a fun time.

ESPNHS: Do you play anymore?

JL: I completely stopped when I left college at 18. I had a good run and learned a lot. It might sound cliché, but being a team player [helps you understand that you’re] just one piece of a huge puzzle. Its not all about you. That has helped me in everything I do.

ESPNHS: When did you first know you wanted to act?

JL: When I was little, I asked my mom to move us to Los Angeles and get me an agent. She would say, “Stop it. Go play in the dirt.” So I shoved it aside because she did. We both thought, “Well, every young girl wants to be an actress.” When I found myself still having those feelings at 17, I thought, “Maybe this is what I really want to do?” So I went for it.

ESPNHS: So you had a real high school experience?

JL: Totally. I developed a sense of self before moving to crazy Hollywood, which was really important.

ESPNHS: Did you act in high school?

JL: Yes, but I stopped after my freshman year. I started focusing on soccer instead.


ESPNHS: Most memorable moment on the field?

Suburgatory
Courtesy of ABCIn Suburgatory, Levy plays Tessa, a too-cool-for-school teen forced by her father to leave New York City for the 'burbs.
JL: I was really proud of my yellow cards and getting ’em in when I had to. I never hurt anybody. For me, it was more important to save a goal than to make one -- maybe because I wasn’t good at scoring. But when I saved a goal, it felt so good. I had saved my team from taking a bullet!

ESPNHS: As captain, how did you motivate your team?

JL: Every week, we’d have dinner together. We didn’t just talk about sports. We’d cover everything, from boys to schoolwork to what we were doing outside of school. That really brought us together.

ESPNHS: Most embarrassing moment on the field?

JL: I scored an own goal, which is the most painful experience ever. I honestly don’t remember the details. I just know it happened. I probably blocked it out because it was traumatizing.

ESPNHS: Will Tessa, your character “Suburgatory,” ever play sports?

JL: No, she’s not interested in sports. She thinks jocks are dumb. But she’ll soon realize they’re not. It’s just bad judgment.

Jane Levy's not the only athlete-turned-celebrity. Read about how high school sports helped shape Avril Lavigne and Nina Dobrev into the stars they are today.

This story originally appeared in the Spring issue of ESPNHS Girl magazine. Click here to subscribe.
Dynamic DuosJames Robinson/ESPNHS"We've only gotten to know each other in the past couple years," Caroline Lindquist (left) says of Cameron Castleberry. "But it's made those years so much better."
MORE DYNAMIC DUOS: Morgan Kuhrt and Kinsey Caldwell | Kaela Davis and Kristina Nelson | Cami Chapus and Amy Weissenbach | Dynamic Duos photo gallery

When Cameron Castleberry returned from a week of training with the Under-17 National Team last April, she knew she was in trouble.

She had five days’ worth of schoolwork to make up in addition to the new assignments that were coming in, all in the midst of her high school soccer season at Ravenscroft School (Raleigh, N.C.) and her club season with the Capital Area Soccer League Chelsea Under-16 team.

The stress was overwhelming.

Caroline Lindquist knew the feeling. A year older than her Ravenscroft teammate, Caroline had been to a few national team training camps herself and had experience dealing with the anxious aftermath.

“Caroline gave me a lot of good advice about how to talk to my teachers and manage my workload,” says Cameron, a junior forward/midfielder. “Having someone to talk to who had been through it made me feel so much better.”

Most elite soccer players don’t have that luxury. And Cameron and Caroline certainly are elite. Both have verbally committed to 20-time national champion North Carolina, a breeding ground for World Cup stars from Mia Hamm to Heather O’Reilly.

“We’ve only gotten to know each other in the past couple years,” says Caroline, a senior midfielder/defender. “But it’s made those years so much better.”

Despite playing in the same club program and each being involved with Youth National Teams, last spring was the first time Caroline and Cameron were actually teammates. They became fast friends while sitting next to each other on bus trips to away games.

Their performance on the field had spectators believing they’d been playing together all their lives. The duo led their team to an 18-2-1 record and a trip to the Independent Schools state title game.

In the process, Caroline was named Gatorade North Carolina Girls’ Soccer Player of the Year and Cameron earned conference Player of the Year honors.

“Both girls are incredible individual players to watch,” Ravenscroft coach J.J. Raabe says. “They make it look so fun and effortless.”

Successful soccer season ends in sadness

October, 27, 2011
10/27/11
12:37
PM ET
Normally a team would be celebrating after completing a 15-2 regular season.

But the girls' soccer team at Holland (N.Y.) is only feeling grief.

"I can't express how much I want to play with them and take this to the state finals," senior co-captain Katherine Shanahan told WGRZ-TV.

The team was banned from postseason play because it exceeded the limit of games allowed -- 16 -- by the state.

Get the full story from WGRZ here.
While Good Counsel (Olney, Md.) continued to dig its heels into the No. 1 spot in the POWERADE FAB 50 girls' soccer rankings, a battle is brewing right behind the Falcons.

On Saturday, No. 2 Carmel (Carmel, Ind.) takes on No. 6 Reitz Memorial (Evansville, Ind.), and something's got to give. Both teams are undefeated so far this season.

In the volleyball FAB 50 rankings, the top 10 teams remained in perfect marching order for the second week in a row. Xavier (Phoenix, Ariz.) slid into the No. 11 spot, up from No. 16, and Mater Dei (Santa Ana, Calif.) broke into the rankings at No. 34 after winning the Asics Cal Challenge.

In cross country, Simi Valley (Calif.) moved into the FAB 50 top 10, while Carroll (Southlake, Texas) jumped up from No. 22 to No. 15.
There's yet another team enjoying the view from the top in the POWERADE FAB 50 girls' soccer national rankings.

This time, the honor goes to Good Counsel (Olney, Md.). The Falcons, who started the season at No. 10, have made a steady weekly climb up the rankings and now find themselves alone at the top.

With some big games over the next few weeks, time will tell if the Falcons can get comfortable in the lofty spot.

There was very little movement in the FAB 50 volleyball rankings. In fact, not a single team in the top 15 moved an inch.

Xavier College Prep (Phoenix) made one of the biggest moves, hopping from No. 20 up to No. 26.
Papillion La-Vista South (Papillion, Neb.) refused to budge from the No. 1 spot in the FAB 50 girls volleyball rankings this week despite a mighty push from No. 4 St. James (Lenexa, Kan.).

high school
The Titans, who were crowned national champions a year ago and have a 64-game winning streak, rallied from a set and 10-1 down to win in five. St. James didn't move an inch, either, and remained at No. 4.

Another big riser was Assumption (Louisville, Ky.), which moved up from No. 5 to No. 3 after winning the Asics Challenge in Chicago.

In girls soccer, Council Rock (Newtown, Pa.) leaped 30 spots, all the way to No. 6, after a win over Strath Haven (Wallingford, Pa.). They could move even higher if they can pull off an upset vs. No. 1 Pennington (Pennington, N.J.) on Friday.

In girls cross country, Summit (Bend, Ore.) crashes the top 10 party, moving from No. 15 to No. 7 after winning the Harrier Classic.
Congratulations to the Pennington School (Pennington, N.J.) girls soccer team. The Red Raiders became the first team to hold the No. 1 spot for back-to-back weeks in the girls soccer POWERADE FAB 50 national rankings during the 2011 regular season. Cheers, too, to Indiana. With four undefeated teams in the FAB 50, it is quickly becoming one of the top fall-playing states in the nation.

high school
In volleyball, Papillion-La Vista South (Papillion, Neb.) has had a firm grip on the No. 1 spot in the FAB 50 rankings since last season. But the Titans are in for a tough game on Wednesday when they travel to Kansas to take on No. 4 St. James (Lenexa, Kansas). And while the top 10 remained mainly unchanged this week, expect big movement next week after nine FAB 50 teams, including two in the top five, sort things out this weekend at the Asics Challenge in Chicago.

Likewise in girls cross country, there was only minor movement behind powerhouse No. 1. Fayetteville-Manlius (Manlius, N.Y.). No. 11 Glacier Peak (Snohomish, Wash.) and No. 18 Mountain Vista (Highlands Ranch, Colo.) took big leaps and find themselves among the nation's elite.
The girls soccer scene is anything but settled this season. For the fourth time in four weeks, there is a new No. 1 in the POWERADE FAB 50 national rankings. Powerhouse Pennington School (Pennington, N.J.) moves from No. 3 into the top spot after ties tripped up the two teams in front of it. Kudos to No. 8 Central Catholic (Lawrence, Mass.), which went from unranked a week ago all the way to No. 8 this week after taking down previous No. 6 Danvers (Danvers, Mass.).

high school

In volleyball, the top three teams remained in order, but Assumption (Louisville, Ky.) made its move back into the top five after winning the Durango Classic in Las Vegas, Nev. No. 3 Berkeley Prep (Tampa, Fla.) will be tested this weekend at its own tournament, which features several top contenders. Many of the nation's top teams hit Chicago next weekend for the Asics Challenge.

In cross country, Carmel (Carmel, Ind.) moves into the No. 3 spot behind mainstays Fayetteville-Manlius (Manlius, N.Y.) and La Costa Canyon (Carlsbad, Calif.). The highest-ranked newcomer is South Eugene (Eugene, Ore.) at No. 33.

SPONSORED HEADLINES