High-SchoolGirl: Track and Field

Six girls in running for Gatorade AOY

July, 10, 2012
7/10/12
9:49
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Gatorade POY girlsSusan Goldman/Gatorade

Six outstanding girls are finalists for the 10th annual Gatorade Female High School Athlete of the Year Award. The winner will be announced on Tuesday in Los Angeles (ESPN3, 9:40 p.m. EDT) and will be recognized at the ESPYS the following evening.

Each of the contenders has already been honored as National Player of the Year in her respective sport.

Here are the finalists:

Volleyball: Jordan Burgess, Berkeley Prep (Tampa, Fla.)

Cross country: Molly Seidel, University Lake School (Hartland, Wis.)

Basketball: Breanna Stewart, Cicero-North Syracuse (Syracuse, N.Y.)

Soccer: Morgan Andrews, Milford (N.H.)

Softball: Geri Ann Glasco, Oconee County (Watkinsville, Ga.)

Track & Field: Shelbi Vaughan, Legacy (Mansfield, Texas)

Read the full story here.
Florence Griffith JoynerGetty ImagesFlo-Jo entered the Seoul Olympics as the transcendent star who raced wearing four-inch, painted fingernails and fashionable track outfits that she designed herself.
ESPN is marking the 40th anniversary of Title IX by unveiling the top 40 female athletes of the past 40 years.

Florence Griffith-Joyner was stylish, graceful and faster than any woman in history.

In the summer of 1988, the No. 12 woman in ESPN's countdown set a pair of world records -- first in the 100 meters (10.49 seconds), then in the 200 meters (21.34) -- that many people believe will never be broken. She won three Olympic gold medals at the Seoul Games, in the 100, 200 and 4x100 relay; she also took silver in the 4x400 relay.

"One of the reasons she became so dominant was because of her passion," her former husband Al Joyner says. "She applied herself in everything she did. And it wasn't just running. It was motherhood; it was how deeply she loved. She was second to none in everything she tried."

But Griffith-Joyner, who took up running as a sport when she was only 7 years old, died of epilepsy when she was only 38.

Read the full story from espnW here.

Earlier in this series:
No. 40: Diver Fu Mingxia
No. 39: Jockey Julie Krone
No. 38: Gymnast Mary Lou Retton
No. 37: Hockey player Cammi Granato
No. 36: Soccer player Kristine Lilly
No. 35: Basketball player Diana Taurasi
No 34: Volleyball player Flo Hyman
No. 33: Soccer player Abby Wambach
No. 32: Swimmer Mary T. Meagher
No. 31: Marathoner Joan Benoit
No. 30: Sprinter Gail Devers
No. 29: Basketball player Nancy Lieberman
No. 28: Marathoner Grete Waitz
No. 27: Soccer player Michelle Akers
No. 26: Basketball player Chamique Holdsclaw
No. 25: Swimmer Dara Torres
No. 24: Golfer Nancy Lopez
No. 23: Swimmer Tracy Caulkins
No. 22: Soccer player Marta Vieira da Silva
No. 21: Tennis player Venus Williams
No. 20: Figure skater Michelle Kwan
No. 19: Skier Lindsey Vonn
No. 18: Softball player Lisa Fernandez
No. 17: Basketball player Ann Meyers Drysdale
No. 16: Basketball player Sheryl Swoopes
No. 15: Swimmer Janet Evans
No. 14: Figure skater Katarina Witt
No. 13: Basketball player Cheryl Miller
Gail DeversAlexander Hassenstein/Getty Images"If you have a love for life, and opportunities are presented to you, you make the best of those opportunities," Gail Devers says.
ESPN is marking the 40th anniversary of Title IX by unveiling the top 40 female athletes of the past 40 years

Forget her colorful fingernails. Gail Devers' true signature was breaking the hearts of her fiercest rivals.

Devers, one of the greatest sprinters in Olympic history and No. 30 in ESPN's countdown, certainly had a flair for the dramatic.

At the 1992 Barcelona Games, Devers won gold in the 100 meters by beating Jamaica's Juliet Cuthbert in a photo finish. The next year, at the world championships, she won the 100 after besting Cuthbert's Jamaican compatriot, Merlene Ottey, in another photo finish. And at the 1996 Atlanta Games, Devers did it again, crossing the line in exactly the same time as Ottey, but winning gold thanks to the help of a high-speed camera.

"She's the person who never stops trying," said Greece's Voula Patoulidou, the gold medalist in the 100-meter hurdles in Barcelona.

Read the complete story from espnW here.

Earlier in this series:
No. 40: Diver Fu Mingxia
No. 39: Jockey Julie Krone
No. 38: Gymnast Mary Lou Retton
No. 37: Hockey player Cammi Granato
No. 36: Soccer player Kristine Lilly
No. 35: Basketball player Diana Taurasi
No 34: Volleyball player Flo Hyman
No. 33: Soccer player Abby Wambach
No. 32: Swimmer Mary T. Meagher
No. 31: Marathoner Joan Benoit

Haley Crouser sets javelin record

April, 17, 2012
4/17/12
10:58
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Congratulations to Haley Crouser, a junior at Gresham (Ore.), who set a U.S. high school record when she threw the javelin 181 feet, 2 inches on her second attempt at the Aloha Relays on Friday.

Haley joins her brother Sam (255-4 in 2010) in the record book, where the duo became the only brother-sister combination in history. Throw in cousin Ryan, who broke the indoor shot put and discus records last year, and it’s easy to see why the Crousers have become America’s First Family of Throwing.

“Since Sam has (the record) and I have it, it’s just an unreal feeling,” Haley said. “When I was younger I would have never expected this to happen.”

Read the full story from Doug Binder here.

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