RTC: Comparing Keenum to other QB starts

November, 13, 2013
11/13/13
7:58
AM ET
Reading the coverage of the Houston Texans...

The Houston Chronicle offers this slideshow that includes stats from each team's starting quarterback's first three games. My takeaway is that the way a quarterback starts or how many wins he gets in those first three games doesn't necessarily foretell how his career will go. The Chronicle's John McClain also says not to let Keenum's 0-3 start cloud your view of him.

Here's a great lead by McClain on his story about Ed Reed's departure: "The celebrated signing of free safety Ed Reed turned out to be a colossal failure for the Texans but a financial windfall for one of the greatest defensive backs in NFL history." One more great line, making the point that it was a combination of Reed's play and words that got him cut: "For instance, receiver Andre Johnson is putting on such a spectacular performance that he could call Bob McNair a democrat and keep his job."

Duane Brown made his weekly appearance on CSN Houston and was asked about Ed Reed. He said you can't say the things Reed said after Sunday's game. For a refresher, here's what Reed said. The Texans released Reed on Tuesday.

Fantex, the company that was to sell stock in Arian Foster, announced they are postponing that venture since Foster is having back surgery. The AP story on the announcement is there.

Brooks Reed grew up in Tucson, Ariz., and went to the University of Arizona. Daniel Burk from the Arizona Daily-Star revisited Reed's journey after Sunday's game. My favorite quote from the story from nose tackle Earl Mitchell, who also went to Arizona: "I remember when Brooks was going through the ugly stage. His hair wasn’t as long and the girls didn’t think he was dreamy. But it’s just great to see the growth he’s made. It’s been really exciting for me."

Tania Ganguli

ESPN Houston Texans reporter

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