RTC: Columnist's concerns with play calling

September, 23, 2013
9/23/13
9:33
AM ET
Reading the coverage of the Texans...

Plenty to talk about after the first Texans' loss of the season.

Jerome Solomon of the Houston Chronicle tells us that Gary Kubiak is not psychic. He explains, Kubiak's statement that he expected to be in a defensive struggle was a self-fulfilling prophecy and that the game began as a low-scoring game only because the Texans didn't score. He has a good point. There is no reason the Texans should have accepted a low-scoring game, especially given the 43 points they scored last season. On the other hand, sometimes playcalling is a function of a coach knowing his team's limitations.

What we love most about our friend John McClain is how consistent he is. I'm talking about his use of the word "pathetic," which appears in the very first sentence of this story. He also calls the loss "humiliating," the Texans' offense "hapless" and notes that defense and special teams both contributed in "embarrassing" fashion.

Brian Smith of the Chronicle looks at quarterback Matt Schaub's troubles.

Culture Map's Chris Baldwin says the Texans were humiliated, but are on track for the Super Bowl. He notes, correctly, that a loss like this can help a team. A nicely written column begins and ends with a scene from the Texans locker room in which Reed tried to rush Danieal Manning, who was getting dressed, to catch the plane. The scene ends noting the two safeties have plenty of time. And so do the Texans.

The Ravens put together a retro-Ravens performance to beat the Texans, writes Don Banks of SI.com.

From back in Houston, CSNHouston.com's Dave Zangaro writes about the game and awards offensive and defensive heroes and zeroes.

With the stadium eerily quiet and the Ravens needing a game-changing play, linebacker Daryl Smith complied, writes David Ginsburg of the Associated Press.

Tania Ganguli

ESPN Houston Texans reporter

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