Jacksonville Jaguars: David Bruton

What the Jaguars can expect in the draft

April, 8, 2014
Apr 8
4:00
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JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- The Jacksonville Jaguars have 11 picks in the 2014 NFL draft, which begins a month from today. It’ll be the second go-around for general manager David Caldwell, who seems to have put together a solid first draft class.

What kind of talent can Caldwell expect to find when he makes his selections (Nos. 3, 39, 70, 105, 114, 144, 150, 159, 179, 205 and 222)? Here’s a look at the player selected at each of those spots the past five years.

Some have turned out pretty good. Some haven’t worked out at all. But it’s fun to look back and see some recognizable and not-so-recognizable names.

Round 1 (No. 3 overall)

2013: DE Dion Jordan (Oregon) by Miami.

2012: RB Trent Richardson (Alabama) by Cleveland.

2011: DT Marcell Dareus (Alabama) by Buffalo.

2010: DT Gerald McCoy (Oklahoma) by Tampa Bay.

2009: DE Tyson Jackson (LSU) by Kansas City.

Round 2 (No. 39 overall)

2013: QB Geno Smith (West Virginia) by the New York Jets.

2012: CB Janoris Jenkins (North Alabama) by St. Louis.

2011: LB Akeem Ayers (UCLA) by Tennessee.

2010: WR Arrelious Benn (Illinois) by Tampa Bay.

2009: OT Eben Britton (Arizona) by Jacksonville.

Round 3 (No. 70 overall)

2013: CB Blidi Wreh-Wilson (Connecticut) by Tennessee.

2012: P Bryan Anger (California) by Jacksonville.

2011: LB Justin Houston (Georgia) by Tennessee.

2010: TE Ed Dickson (Oregon) by Baltimore.

2009: DE Michael Johnson (Georgia Tech) by Cincinnati.

Round 4 (No. 105 overall)

2013: FS Duke Williams (Nevada) by Buffalo.

2012: LB Nigel Bradham (FSU) by Buffalo.

2011: RB Roy Helu (Nebraska) by Washington.

2010: DB Trevard Lindley (Kentucky) by Philadelphia.

2009: DE Henry Melton (Texas) by Chicago.

Round 4 (No. 114 overall)

2013: CB B.W. Webb (William & Mary) by Dallas.

2012: DT Jaye Howard (Florida) by Seattle.

2011: WR Cecil Shorts (Mount Union) by Jacksonville.

2010: TE Dennis Pitta (Brigham Young) by Baltimore.

2009: DB David Bruton (Notre Dame) by Denver.

Round 5 (No. 144 overall)

2013: WR Kenny Stills (Oklahoma) by New Orleans.

2012: OT Zebrie Sanders (FSU) by Buffalo.

2011: DB Shiloh Keo (Idaho) by Houston.

2010: DB Sherrick McManis (Northwestern) by Houston.

2009: WR Jarrett Dillard (Rice) by Jacksonville.

Round 5 (No. 150 overall)

2013: CB Terry Hawthorne (Illinois) by Pittsburgh.

2012: G Rokevious Watkins (South Carolina) by St. Louis.

2011: OT Jason Pinkston (Pittsburgh) by Cleveland.

2010: P Zoltan Mesko (Michigan) by New England.

2009: LB Jasper Brinkley (South Carolina) by Minnesota.

Round 5 (No. 159 overall)

2013: CB Micah Hyde (Iowa) by Green Bay.

2012: RB Chris Rainey (Florida) by Pittsburgh.

2011: TE Lee Smith (Marshall) by New England.

2010: WR Riley Cooper (Florida) by Philadelphia.

2009: OT Fenuki Tupou (Oregon) by Philadelphia.

Round 6 (No. 179 overall)

2013: LB Tourek Williams (FIU) by San Diego.

2012: G Andrew Tiller (Syracuse) by New Orleans.

2011: G Caleb Schlauderaff (Utah) by Green Bay.

2010: OT Sam Young (Notre Dame) by Dallas.

2009: DB Morgan Trent (Michigan) by Cincinnati.

Round 6 (No. 205 overall)

2013: DT Stacy McGee (Oklahoma) by Oakland.

2012: DT Billy Winn (Boise State) by Cleveland.

2011: DE Lazarius Levingston (LSU) by Seattle.

2010: G Ted Larsen (N.C. State) by new England.

2009: DT Ra’Shon Harris (Oregon) by Pittsburgh.

Round 7 (No. 222 overall)

2013: TE Chris Gragg (Arkansas) by Buffalo.

2012: LB Caleb McSurdy (Montana) by Dallas.

2011: DB Anthony Gaitor (FIU) by Tampa Bay.

2010: WR Marc Mariani (Montana) by Tennessee.

2009: P Pat McAfee (West Virginia) by Indianapolis.

Special-teams mistakes doom Jaguars

October, 13, 2013
10/13/13
10:25
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DENVER -- A lot of the roster moves the Jacksonville Jaguars have made over the past two months have been to improve on special teams.

They really struggled during the first half of the preseason, but those signings helped stabilize the units. But the problems the Jaguars had on special teams during Sunday’s 35-19 loss to the Denver Broncos had nothing to do with personnel.

It was execution and one questionable decision.

[+] EnlargeDavid Bruton
Jerilee Bennett/Colorado Springs Gazette/MCT via Getty ImagesDavid Bruton's 35-yard run on a fake punt was just one of the Jaguars' special-teams miscues.
"We went in with the mindset that we’re going to be aggressive in this game," Jaguars coach Gus Bradley said. "Instead of [how] maybe some thought we would back off, we wanted to be the other way. We wanted to be really aggressive."

That’s why Bradley called for a fake punt on the Jaguars’ first possession. It was a gutsy call because the Jaguars were on their own 26-yard line. But it showed his players that he wasn’t kidding about being aggressive.

It was a sound call, too, because the Jaguars saw something on tape that they believed they could exploit. It wasn’t a spur-of-the-moment decision. Not a bad gamble at all, considering the winless Jaguars had been 28-point underdogs.

But the fake itself was questionable at best. It was fourth-and-4 and fullback Will Ta’ufo’ou took a direct snap and tried to run up the middle. There was no room, just a pile of bodies. Not surprisingly, he gained just 1 yard, and the Jaguars gave Denver the ball on their 27-yard line.

"We felt like we had something," Bradley said. "[We] reviewed it and we talked about it and we felt like from the 20 to the 40 in that situation we could maybe steal a series."

Six plays later, the Broncos led 7-0.

The Jaguars’ two other big special-teams mistakes were because of poor execution. Rookie long-snapper Carson Tinker bounced a snap about a foot in front of holder Bryan Anger, who couldn't corral it and ended up being tackled for a 14-yard loss.

"Sometimes rookies make mistakes," Bradley said. "We talk about Josh [Evans] and Cyp [John Cyprien] and some other rookies that do it. You know, he’s a rookie, too. I guess sometimes that can happen at inopportune times."

The Jaguars got burned again late in the third quarter. The Broncos ran a fake punt on fourth-and-2 from their own 48-yard line, with David Bruton taking a direct snap and going around left end for a 35-yard gain.

It was perfect timing. The Jaguars were trailing by only 11 points, had just forced what they thought was a three-and-out and were thinking of possibly making it a one-score game. It was a well-designed play, too. Bruton is a safety, not a fullback. And he ran outside, not into the middle of the line. Nobody even saw him until he blew by the first-down marker.

Being aggressive was a sound plan, and it’s something the Jaguars should continue to do. But it’s not going to work if they continue to make small mistakes.

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