Don't expect letdown from these Chiefs

October, 22, 2013
10/22/13
3:05
PM ET
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Maybe the most extraordinary thing about the Kansas City Chiefs going from 2-14 last season to being 7-0 and the NFL’s last remaining unbeaten team this year is that they don’t seem impressed by what they’ve accomplished.

Sure, they’ll celebrate after each win. That party seemed a little louder and a little longer after Sunday's 17-16 win over the Houston Texans. But eventually they’ll get over it and move on to serious preparation for the next Sunday’s game, in this case a meeting with the Cleveland Browns at Arrowhead Stadium.

That’s why the talk of a trap game between now and the Nov. 17 meeting with the Broncos in Denver seems silly. The Chiefs’ ability to focus on the task at hand has been extraordinary. The Chiefs haven’t always played at their peak in their seven games but the effort and the attention to detail has been a constant.

“I talked to them about this,’’ coach Andy Reid said of the one-game-at-a-time approach. “You just kind of come in and say; 'this is what we do' and 'let’s go.' Everything that we’ve talked about, they’ve been OK with. They just kind of go full speed at it, so I appreciate that as a head coach.”

Eventually the Chiefs will play against some opponents on or at their own level. Over the final seven regular-season games, they will play the Broncos twice, the San Diego Chargers twice, the Indianapolis Colts and at the Oakland Raiders and Washington Redskins.

The next two games, including the Nov. 3 meeting with the Bills in Buffalo, look at this point to the rest of us like the Chiefs’ last remaining gimmes. Just don’t expect the Chiefs to view them that way. We know that if we’ve learned anything from these seven wins.

So go ahead and dismiss any talk of a trap game. If the Browns and/or Bills beat the Chiefs, it will happen because they earned it, not because the Chiefs were eyeing bigger prizes down the road.

Adam Teicher

ESPN Kansas City Chiefs reporter

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