Here's how Chiefs can find elite receiver

April, 9, 2014
Apr 9
7:30
AM ET
I previously noted the Kansas City Chiefs had none of the 14 players ESPN's Matt Wiiliamson listed as true No. 1 receivers (ESPN Insider access is required to read the story). The Chiefs were also shut out from Williamson's list of 11 receivers who deserve honorable mention.

Tight end Travis Kelce made Williamson's list of young players who could eventually develop into one of these receivers. But Kelce isn't there yet, so let's assume for the purpose of this argument that the Chiefs' next great receiver isn't currently on their roster.

So how do the Chiefs go about finding an elite receiver of their own? Let's use Williamson's list as a guide. First, they'll probably have to draft and develop him. None of the 14 true No. 1 receivers he lists has played for an NFL team other than the one he's on now.

Next, they'll need to find a big guy. Of Williamson's 14 elite NFL receivers, the only ones under 6-3 are Michael Crabtree of the San Francisco 49ers (6-1) and Dez Bryant of the Dallas Cowboys (6-2). The only one less than 210 pounds is A.J. Green of the Cincinnati Bengals (207).

Receiving has become a big man's game. That's not to say a smaller player can't be productive but generally speaking a receiver has to be able to win some physical battles with defensive backs and succeed in the occasional jump ball.

Generally speaking, the Chiefs will need to make the acquisition of an elite receiver a priority. Of Williamson's 14 receivers, eight were drafted in the first round, four in the second, one in the third and one in the fourth. While the Chiefs won't have to get a top receiver in the first round, they had better not wait much longer.

In a later post, we'll look at some of the wide receivers available in this year's draft and how they might fit into this criteria.

Adam Teicher

ESPN Kansas City Chiefs reporter

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