Chiefs face interesting choices at QB

May, 30, 2014
5/30/14
8:00
AM ET
Kevin Seifert of ESPN offers an interesting take and something for the Kansas City Chiefs to consider as their battle for roster spots at quarterback heats up.

Daniel
Seifert believes a team can be as well off, or even better, with a young developmental player as their No. 2 quarterback as opposed to an established veteran. He offers as evidence the fact that 31 of the 36 playoff teams over the past three seasons had a 15- or 16-game starter at quarterback, which suggests a team is in real trouble if it loses its starting quarterback. Of the other five teams who needed their backup to make the playoffs, three of those quarterbacks were developmental players who succeeded.

That brings us to the Chiefs, who have starter Alex Smith, veteran backup Chase Daniel, developmental prospect Tyler Bray and fifth-round draft pick Aaron Murray. Might they be better off when the season starts by keeping the two younger quarterbacks as backups to Smith and trading or releasing Daniel?

They shouldn't even consider the prospect if they don't feel either Bray or Murray is capable of playing in case of injury to Smith. But if they do feel that way about one of their young quarterbacks, then they might be best off going that route.

The biggest reason is that the Chiefs' long-term situation at quarterback is unsettled. Smith is still unsigned after this season, and if that doesn't happen, the Chiefs are in no position to part ways with a developmental quarterback who they feel could eventually be their starter.

Even if they have to take the drastic step of keeping four quarterbacks, that is what the Chiefs should do if they believe both Bray and Murray have a reasonable shot at becoming a solid, or better, player.

"If they’re (among) the best (players), then we’re going for it," coach Andy Reid said, endorsing the idea. "That’s what you do."

Adam Teicher

ESPN Kansas City Chiefs reporter

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