Print and Go Back ESPN.com: Dodgers Report [Print without images]

Wednesday, June 5, 2013
Quick take: Padres 6, Dodgers 2

By Mark Saxon


LOS ANGELES -- The Los Angeles Dodgers already knew Yasiel Puig was human. He just hadn't proven it until Wednesday.

Puig, who had jolted Dodger Stadium to life with two electrifying performances in his first two major league games, landed back on earth Wednesday. Puig was 0-for-4 with a couple of strikeouts, and the Dodgers' offense went back into the doldrums with a 6-2 loss to the San Diego Padres.

It's fair to say Puig isn't going to drive in five runs or end the game with a massive throw every night, so the Dodgers probably will need to find other ways to start their engine while he's here.

The Dodgers didn’t have their first baserunner off Jason Marquis until the fifth inning and they managed just four hits for the game.

They felt pretty good about their chances of picking up the sweep behind ace Clayton Kershaw, but Kershaw wasn't particularly crisp and the Dodgers rarely score for him. He struggled putting hitters away and needed 120 pitches to get through six innings. Kershaw gave up three runs and seven hits and struck out nine. One of the runs was unearned due to a Hanley Ramirez throwing error in the second inning.

The Dodgers have trouble scoring in general, but particularly when Kershaw pitches. His 2.68 runs of support was fourth-worst in the National League coming into the game.

The Dodgers still haven't staged a dramatic late rally all season. They are 0-27 when entering the ninth inning trailing.

The Dodgers scored their first run after Skip Schumaker hit a two-out double and Adrian Gonzalez ripped a single off second baseman Jedd Gyorko's glove. Their only other run came on a towering home run by Scott Van Slyke, who has been a bright spot. He has hit six home runs in only 19 games for the Dodgers.

The Dodgers' bullpen hasn't exactly been stellar. Young lefty Paco Rodriguez needed 40 pitches to get two outs, walking three batters and allowing three late runs.