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Tuesday, November 8, 2011
Nitty-gritty details about Dodger sale process emerge


Bad news, good news: Frank McCourt will have "close to the final say" on who buys the Dodgers, according to Tony Jackson of ESPNLosAngeles.com, but only from a group of candidates approved by Major League Baseball.

McCourt's choice would then have to be approved by the other MLB owners, but since that choice would have been pre-approved by MLB already ... you get the idea. Writes Jackson:
... It also isn't immediately clear whether there is a minimum number of applicants that MLB must approve and submit to McCourt and Blackstone, but one source said it would be a "reasonable" number, meaning MLB couldn't simply handpick the next owner by approving only one applicant. Although several individuals and groups already have gone public with their interest in buying the club, that list of applicants figures to dwindle to no more than a handful -- perhaps five, one source estimated -- who actually file applications because of the tremendous amount of money that must be secured in order to submit a worthy bid. ...

Jackson has more detailing the intricacies of gaining MLB approval in this November 5 background story. Meanwhile, Ramona Shelburne addresses my issue of Dodger-based groups competing against each other in her latest piece, calling for them to work together as much as possible.

And then there's this from Bill Shaikin of the Times, who writes that McCourt will still seek to profit from the Dodgers' post-2013 TV rights, noting this Matthew Futterman report in the Wall Street Journal:
... In the auction, Mr. McCourt and his advisers at Blackstone Group, which is managing the Dodgers sale, will solicit separate bids for the team and its media rights, and then will try to arrange a partnership between the highest bidders for each before a final deal is struck. Ultimately, only the winning bidder for the team would have the right to execute a new media-rights deal.

If they prefer, bidders also will be allowed to submit a combined offer for both the team and its media rights. ...


The Journal also said that McCourt could "maintain a stake in the parking lots at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles that are leased to the team for use on game days."

I'm still of the hope that a clean break from McCourt will be a condition of any offer that MLB approves.

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