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Sunday, April 11, 2010
Relief disbelief: Same old song with a few new lines

Keith Srakocic/AP
George Sherrill's bad outing against Pittsburgh on Opening Day was mere prelude to Saturday's Florida fright night.

George Sherrill should be able to get three outs before he gives up three runs. And inevitably, there was going to be a do-or-die situation this season when he would need to do that. Just as Vicente Padilla shouldn't give up four runs on nine baserunners in 4 1/3 innings, Sherrill needs to do better if the Dodgers are going avoid trouble.

But Padilla and Sherrill's failings are basically heat-of-the-battle failings, whereas Joe Torre's use of Jonathan Broxton this week is the equivalent of filling the bubbles in your SAT exam with Crayola burnt orange. (Assuming they still use bubbles.)

We've said it before and we hate to say it again – so this is going to be brief. If you can't afford to allow a run – as was the case when the Dodgers played extra innings in Pittsburgh on Wednesday – you use the pitcher least likely to allow a run. Only after that pitcher has been used do you turn to others. And certainly, you don't worry about saving your best pitcher for a situation in which you can allow a run and still win.

On one level, it was coincidental that Torre's use of Broxton this week led to us talking about his absence from Saturday's game. It required a specific flow of events from Opening Day on. On the other hand, we do see this from Dodger managers, including Torre's recent predecessors, all too often. If Sherrill had been used Saturday after a proper use of Broxton in previous days, people would have been talking about Sherrill overnight a lot more than Torre.

Do not save your best reliever for a save situation in an extra-inning game on the road.