Dodger Thoughts: Michael Schneider

Could Eric Chavez help?

January, 5, 2011
1/05/11
8:25
PM PT
If Eric Chavez can perform better in a January 20 workout than, say, Chien-Ming Wang in a parking lot, the Dodgers might have a new part-time third baseman.

Susan Slusser of the San Francisco Chronicle reported the scheduled workout:
Chavez has been working out at the Athletes' Performance center in Arizona five days a week and he said that after three-plus years of injury problems, he is feeling good, he's taking grounders at third and his problematic right shoulder, operated on twice, is much better.

"The throwing has been unreal," he said in a text. "I need to see live pitching to judge the hitting accurately, but things look good."

Chavez probably would be signed to a non-guaranteed deal, given his history, but the Dodgers are believed to have strong interest if his health checks out OK. Chavez has stated a preference for playing in Southern California, and he has spoken to Dodgers manager Don Mattingly and is impressed with him.
Chavez OPSed over .800 against righties every year from 2000-2006, which would make him an enticing platoon partner for Casey Blake, but he hasn't had even a semi-productive season since 2007.

* * *

On the occasion of his 63rd birthday, here's a great recap of Dodger senior player development advisor Charlie Hough's career at Big League Stew:
... He's the only pitcher ever with both 400 relief appearances and 400 starts. He was drafted as a third baseman, but his first minor league manager, Tommy Lasorda, decided to convert him to the mound. ("You might as well pitch. You can't do anything else," Lasorda told him.)

Hough learned the knuckler from a coach named Goldie Holt, and the Dodgers hired the 47-year-old Hoyt Wilhelm to help him master it. Wilhelm continued to pitch for two more seasons, retiring two weeks before his 50th birthday.

Hough was the last knuckleballer in the All-Star game before Tim Wakefield's charity appearance in 2009. And Hough's performance in the 1986 Midsummer Classic was legendary. He allowed a leadoff double to the Giants' Chris Brown, then struck out the next two batters — except that Hough's catcher, Rich Gedman of the Red Sox, failed to catch either of the third strikes, which meant that Brown scored the National League's first run on a strikeout-wild pitch followed by a strikeout-passed ball. He is still the all-time leading winner in the history of the Texas Rangers, one of the best Hawaiian-born players and one of Reggie Jackson's three victims in Game 6 of the 1977 World Series. ...

* * *

Via Baseball Musings, pitcher Dirk Hayhurst has a message for youth coaches that's a good read.

* * *

Phil Wallace offers his picks for the 10 best and 10 most disappointing Dodger acquisitions of the past 25 years at L.A. Observed's Native Intelligence.

* * *

I can't say good night without offering a parting salute to Mike Schneider, my Variety colleague who is leaving this month to head the Los Angeles bureau of TV Guide. Mike is simply one of the best, brightest and most fun people I have ever worked with, and though we'll march on without him, the office just won't be the same. But I'm wishing him the best of luck on an opportunity I know he's so excited about, and thinking now I'll definitely have to make time for a Great Los Angeles Walk.






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TEAM LEADERS

WINS LEADER
Clayton Kershaw
WINS ERA SO IP
20 1.80 228 190
OTHER LEADERS
BAY. Puig .298
HRA. Gonzalez 23
RBIA. Gonzalez 106
RD. Gordon 89
OPSY. Puig .869
ERAC. Kershaw 1.80
SOC. Kershaw 228