Dodger Thoughts: Tim Wallach

Tony Jackson of ESPNLosAngeles.com reports on the latest with Tim Wallach, the Dodgers' AAA manager at Albuquerque. The bottom line is this: Wallach has a contract in place that puts him on the Dodger coaching staff next year – either as bench coach or third-base coach (but not as hitting coach) – if he isn't hired to manage other team. But there are hints that Wallach hasn't stopped looking for a managerial job.
... Reached on his cell phone Sunday, Wallach declined to confirm or deny that he has signed such a contract and declined to comment at all on the matter, referring all questions to Dodgers general manager Ned Colletti. Colletti, who has been tight-lipped about the process of filling new manager Don Mattingly's first coaching staff, didn't immediately return a voice mail from ESPNLosAngeles.com.

There still is no guarantee, however, that Wallach will remain with the organization. He has made no secret of his desire to manage in the majors, and at least one team has asked the Dodgers for permission to interview him for its managerial vacancy. Such permission is customarily granted in baseball whenever an individual has a chance to interview for a job that would be viewed as a promotion from his current position.

There presently are eight major league clubs with managerial vacancies. Wallach, who spent much of his playing career with the old Montreal Expos, was thought to be a leading candidate in Toronto, where Cito Gaston is retiring. But the Toronto Sun reported last week that Wallach is no longer under consideration by the Blue Jays. ...

Perhaps we'll find out soon that Wallach has committed to the Dodgers for 2011, but for now, with no official word from anyone involved, this is not case closed.

Dustin Bradford/Icon SMIDon Mattingly will be the Dodgers' seventh manager since 1996.

The Tim Wallach bandwagon seemed to be gaining steam in recent weeks, but in the end it was as everyone foretold: The Dodgers have officially announced that Don Mattingly will manage the team in 2011, succeeding Joe Torre.

With any first-time manager, you don't really know how it's going to go until it goes (that's my poor imitation of Joni Mitchell). Wallach was something of a sweetheart candidate, partly with his echoes of Mike Scioscia (even though Wallach mainly spent his career in Montreal), but more because he just seemed to have earned the job more than Mattingly had. Player reports were glowing. But unless you've been hanging with the Isotopes, you didn't really see how he managed a team, and even if you were in Albuquerque, you don't know how his strategy might change with winning a priority over player development.

Of course, Mattingly is an even bigger mystery. The Dodgers are betting that his understanding of the game and Torre's tutelage trumps any need for having done this before, and that managing in the Arizona Fall League will seal the deal. I wasn't convinced all year that this was a good bet, and I'm not convinced now. I poured my thoughts out on this in June, and my take on this remains what it was:
... I don't know of anyone, even his stanuchest supporters, who touts Torre as a brilliant tactical manager. He has had moments of strategic inspiration, but they seem more than undermined by his justifiably maligned use of his pitching staff and other odd lineup and bench moves. Some of the criticism of Torre is overblown, but there's a layer of truth to it that dates back to his Yankee days. ...

Obviously, Mattingly's baseball knowledge is not limited to his time by Torre's side, but surely his tactics are going to be heavily influenced by Torre. And that, while not being the worst thing in the world, is not anything to be excited about.

Then you have to ask yourself, is Mattingly the type of person who can nurture a clubhouse, who can make a team better when the game isn't going on?

I don't know Mattingly at all, so I'm not qualified to answer that question. But my concern is that Mattingly is being handed this job not because of any actual qualifications, but because he's perceived (hoped) to be Torre II. He'll continue Torre's winning ways just by having soaked up his innate Torreness.

If it were that simple, I don't think Lakers fans would be concerned about Phil Jackson leaving.

As a counter-example, Tim Wallach has both coached on the major league level and managed on the minor league level for the Dodgers. He was named Pacific Coast League Manager of the Year in 2009. This season, he has been doing a barefoot walk across the coals, because the Dodgers' pitching problems have absolutely burned their top affiliate in Albuquerque. In this season alone, Wallach has had to use 17 starting pitchers this season in 74 games. He has very little in the way of top-rated Triple-A prospects right now. He has had to work without the safety net of a Joe Torre and then some.

This resume doesn't prove that Wallach will be a successful major league manager. But I can't see how it isn't a better resume than Mattingly's, whose entire managerial C.V. consists of, "He's Don Mattingly, Yankees legend and student of Joe Torre."

As the Dodgers prepare to bid farewell to Torre, this year, next year or whenever, they have some responsibilities, some explicit, some implicit. For one thing, Major League Baseball requires the Dodgers to interview at least one minority candidate for the position. Whether you believe in this rule or not, I'd argue that the Dodgers should not make this interview a token activity, but rather at least one of a number of serious interviews, a wider exploration into whether anyone is better than Mattingly for the job. Clearly, Mattingly has impressed people in the organization, but has he done so in ways that really matter? If they pause and step back, are there not potential managers out there who would be more compelling?

By writing this piece, I risk giving this decision more importance than it deserves. The talent on the field is still more important than the talent in the dugout, and a hire of Mattingly isn't going to ruin the Dodgers. Mattingly is not Torre, and given what happened Sunday, some might say that's a good thing. But the Dodgers should ask themselves whether a Mattingly hire would bring continuity in all the wrong places.

I really do think the Dodgers or MLB need to answer why the minority interview requirement for the Dodgers is being bypassed for the second time in a row.

In the end, Mattingly may turn out to be the real deal as a manager, just as he was as a player. Just like Torre, in fact. Keep in mind, though, that Torre (who took over the Mets as a novice manager while still on the active playing roster) didn't have a winning season until his seventh season.

So maybe the way to look at this is you're giving a young prospect with great potential a quick route to the big leagues, just like, say, Clayton Kershaw. Or Matt Kemp. Or Joel Guzman. You know, one of those.

McDonaldmania in Pittsburgh

September, 14, 2010
9/14/10
2:06
PM PT

Kathy Kmonicek/APJames McDonald pitched eight shutout innings for the Pirates on Monday.

It's not like he's got the upside of Carlos Santana, but will you look at what James McDonald is doing for Pittsburgh?

McDonald has a 3.49 ERA in eight starts with the Pirates. That includes five runs he allowed in the seventh inning of a game in which Pittsburgh couldn't come to his rescue in time; otherwise his ERA with the team would be 2.59, with more than eight strikeouts per nine innings.

The most telling stat in the above paragraph? Eight starts. That's three more than McDonald had in his Dodger career, and they've all come right in a row. Even if McDonald had a disappointing start, Pittsburgh put him right out there again.

Now, perhaps that's a luxury that the Pirates can afford that the Dodgers felt they couldn't. And maybe McDonald needed the so-called change of scenery — although I think that's more often a mythical benefit than a real one. Maybe this is just McDonald's version of Elymania, a hot streak whose end is around the corner.

The fact remains, the Dodgers parted with their two-time minor league pitcher of the year and an effective member of their 2009 bullpen, earning a minimum salary, in order to acquire Octavio Dotel. They nurtured McDonald through eight years in the organization, and then gave up too soon.

* * *

Ramona Shelburne, on a roll, continues reaping the rewards of her investment of time in the Albuquerque Isotopes with this ESPNLosAngeles.com feature on Dodger managerial candidate Tim Wallach. The Wallach bandwagon has enough momentum that it's going to be quite jarring if he doesn't get the job.

* * *

Update: Jack Moore of Fangraphs says McDonald's peripheral stats compare well with David Price of Tampa Bay.
Let's start with Sunday's best story: John Lindsey is finally a major leaguer. From Ramona Shelburne of ESPNLosAngeles.com:
Lindsey, 33, the Los Angeles Dodgers' Triple-A first baseman who has played more seasons in the minors without earning a call-up to the majors than any current player, was among five players the Dodgers promoted Sunday afternoon.

Lindsey will be joined by third baseman Russ Mitchell, who is also making his major league debut, infielder Chin Lung Hu, and pitchers Jon Link and John Ely.

For Lindsey, set to join the team Monday, it was the realization of a lifelong dream. He's spent nearly half his adult life in the minor leagues, since the Colorado Rockies took him in the 13th round of the 1995 draft.

He's had a career season in 2010, batting .354 with 25 home runs for the Albuquerque Isotopes.

"Oh man, the second [Isotopes manager Tim Wallach] told me my whole brain kind of shut down. I was hearing what he was saying, but I couldn't even believe it," Lindsey said.

"He went to shake my hand and I had to hug him because my legs were so weak."

Lindsey said Wallach had initially tried to fool him by asking him to come into his office, then slamming the door.

"I think he was trying to mess with me, but [hitting coach] Johnny Moses was in the corner, trying to keep a straight face the whole time, but he couldn't stop smiling," Lindsey said.

"Wally told me it was the happiest day as a manager he's ever had. I walked out of that office and hugged all my teammates, called my wife, and I haven't stopped smiling or pacing around the clubhouse since.

"I probably won't sleep the next three or four days." ...

Sometimes, it's not whether you win or lose, it's that you get to play the game.

Says Eric Stephen of True Blue L.A.: Lindsey, who is 33 years, 219 days old today, will be the oldest non-Japanese Dodger to make his MLB debut since Pete Wojey (34 years, 213 days) on July 2, 1954.

* * *

As for Sunday's results – yes, the team looking to make a miracle comeback in the standings suffered a blow. Arizona fell to Houston, 3-2, missing a chance to close within 12 games of the fourth-place Dodgers, who lost to San Francisco, 3-0.

The Dodgers' magic number to clinch non-last place is 12. Los Angeles has clinched the tiebreaker against Arizona by winning the season series, so even though six of the Dodgers' final nine games are against the Diamondbacks, the odds remain in the Dodgers' favor.

Oh, as for the other races? Can't say the Dodgers are doing much there.

The Padres are the first team to stay in first place despite a 10-game losing streak since the 1932 Pittsburgh Pirates, and looking to be the first team to make the playoffs despite a 10-game losing streak since the 1982 Atlanta Braves, according to Stat of the Day. That was the year that the Dodgers took advantage of the Braves' slump to regain the National League West lead, only to run into a most bitter ending. This year is looking bitter in a different way.

Greg Zakwin wraps up Sunday's Ack-loss at Memories of Kevin Malone: "(Andre) Ethier, Jamey Carroll, and Matt Kemp struck out a combined eight times. Five baserunners. Thirteen strikeouts in total against just a single, solitary walk drawn. Just a single extra-base hit. No Dodger reached base more than once. Pitiful is a word that seems to perfectly describe the offensive side of things since the All-Star Break."

Hiroki Kuroda made his sixth straight start of at least seven innings, with a 2.47 ERA and .179 opponents batting average in that time, according to the Dodger press notes. Ken Gurnick of MLB.com notes that it was the sixth time this year that Kuroda has been on the wrong end of a shutout. As Tony Jackson of ESPNLosAngeles.com writes, opportunities to watch Kuroda in a Dodger uniform might be dwindling to a precious few.

* * *
  • Al Wolf of the Times (via Keith Thursby of the Daily Mirror) predicted in 1960 what the team's 1962 Dodger Stadium opener would be like. His conclusion: "As broadcaster Vince Scully said in his dulcet tones: 'Wotta show! Wotta show! Come on out tomorrow night, those of you who missed it. But if you can't be with us, plunk down a dollar in your pay TV set and watch it that way. Or better yet, put in two bucks and see it all in living color.'"
  • Fred Claire, who acquired Tim Wallach for the Dodgers on Christmas Eve 1992, puts his support at MLB.com for the Wallach for Manager campaign, though not with the Dodgers specifically. Claire, of course, was the Dodger general manager throughout Mike Scioscia's post-playing Dodger career. His departure preceded Scioscia's by about a year.
  • Four of the Dodgers in Sunday's game – Carroll, Ryan Theriot, Ethier and Reed Johnson – finished with a .289 batting average.

September 4 game chat

September, 4, 2010
9/04/10
6:45
PM PT

Tim Wallach, to Kevin Baxter of the Times on the upside of being turned down for the Padres' managerial job four years ago and eventually making his way to Albuquerque: "If I hadn't done this, I would have been overmatched in the big leagues. ... I made a lot of mistakes because I was not ahead in the game. You have to be a couple of innings ahead, six hitters ahead.
There's an angle of the McCourt divorce trial that I think has been underplayed. From The Days and Tweets of Molly Knight:
To sum up (if Frank is losing): either Frank pays Jamie off and keeps team--which would be the sane thing--or Jamie wins and Frank spends 2 years appealing.

And also:
Whoever loses on MPA is likely to appeal. With the logjam in CA courts now, that could take up to 36 months, I'm told. Worst case, obvs.

It could be a while just to get a decision on this trial from Judge Scott Gordon, if there is no settlement.
Judge will have 90 days AFTER trial ends in late September to make his decision on MPA. So we night not know until Christmas.

After this week, the trial takes a break, not scheduled to resume until Sept. 20.

* * *

Whenever I told people that the divorce wasn't to blame for the current state of the Dodger finances, I tried to emphasize that it was because the finances would have been what they were even if the McCourts remained happily married. Bill Shaikin's piece in the Times underscores that point.

The divorce didn't cause the Dodgers' financial problems. It's what brought those problems up to the surface.

* * *

Other links:
  • Breath of fresh air: Hong-Chih Kuo played some catch with fans in the Dodger Stadium bleachers, as you can see in this post from Roberto Baly of Vin Scully Is My Homeboy.
  • Albuquerque had its own bullpen nightmare Wednesday, blowing a 13-6 ninth-inning lead. It was a key loss that could accelerate the end of the Isotopes' season (and, if you're looking for silver linings, possibly bring some callups to Los Angeles sooner). Christopher Jackson of Albuquerque Baseball Examiner has more; Jon Link gave up the final five runs in the shocking (note Jackson's URL) 15-13 defeat.

    “We had one more (pitcher) but I can’t use everybody," (manager Tim) Wallach said, adding that anyone left would not have been able to pitch for very long.
“That first night kind of set us up in a bad spot for the doubleheader (Tuesday) and then tonight," Wallach added, referring to the Isotopes' 20-9 loss on Monday that saw them use six relievers.
  • Not only have the Dodgers been muffing an opportunity over the past several days to make a surge in the National League wild-card race, they could have made a dramatic run for the NL West title, thanks to San Diego finally hitting a cold streak and losing seven straight games. Putting aside how slim their playoff hopes are, the Dodgers could technically be closer to the NL West lead than the wild card as early as Saturday if the Padres lose to the Rockies and the Phillies keep winning.
  • Mike Petriello of Mike Scioscia's Tragic Illness points out some things to keep an eye on in the likely event that the pennant race goes on without the Dodgers. Among them: Whether to ease up on 22-year-old Clayton Kershaw.
  • As you might know, each year that James Loney's salary increases, it becomes harder to tolerate his below average value as a first baseman -- making him one of the decisions the Dodgers must confront in their busy upcoming offseason. Eric Stephen of True Blue L.A. takes a detailed look at Riddle Me Loney.

Jeff Chiu/AP
Don Mattingly and Joe Torre
Joe Torre's primary skill set is at most one thing: He nurtures the clubhouse.

I don't know of anyone, even his stanuchest supporters, who touts Torre as a brilliant tactical manager. He has had moments of strategic inspiration, but they seem more than undermined by his justifiably maligned use of his pitching staff and other odd lineup and bench moves. Some of the criticism of Torre is overblown, but there's a layer of truth to it that dates back to his Yankee days.

When Torre finally lost his temper on Wednesday after the Dodgers' ninth-inning baserunner follies and criticized some of the players for their decision-making, I understood, but I also felt it was the pot calling out the kettle. So much of Torre's job is decision-making, and so often it goes wrong. Sometimes he makes a good choice that goes bad, but other times his choices are simply indefensible. How many times has Torre not seemed mentally prepared for the game at hand? Does a collapse like Sunday's not lay in large part at Torre's feet, most notably in his overuse of Jonathan Broxton? It's not as simple as "his players didn't do their jobs."

And I say all this with no particular axe to grind. This is not a "Fire Joe Torre" post. I generally like Torre as a person. I don't happen to think that Torre is much worse at game strategy than your garden-variety manager. But let's face it: With Torre, you're betting that the force of his even-keeled personality outweighs his flaws. He 's a bright man, but you're not thinking he's going to take you to the top because he's a grandmaster chess player.

Torre's contract ends after this season. This past weekend, he told reporters that he would decide in September whether he wants to come back for more with the Dodgers, although even then, there's a question of how much the McCourt ownership will want to pay him for the privilege — or whether anyone up top will even be able to focus on the question. The McCourt divorce trial is currently scheduled to begin August 30. What kind of negotiations are there going to be with Torre during that time? If the Dodgers are in fourth place, will there be any negotiations at all? Or is it all in general manager Ned Colletti's hands?

It's possible that the Dodgers will take decide that, with all their other concerns heading into 2011, they'd like stability in the managerial chair and will quickly give Torre what he wants to stay. If the Dodgers bounce back to the top of the division, I'd almost be willing to bet on it.

The only other possibility on the horizon is that Don Mattingly will be the Dodger manager next season. It has been spelled out in no uncertain terms that Mattingly is the heir apparent, and if the Dodgers fall out of the race, Mattingly could be named the 2011 Dodger manager before the 2010 season ends.

This, my friends, gives me the willies.

Mattingly is Joe Torre without Joe Torre's personality or experience. Mattingly has never managed a regular season baseball game and has never coached for anyone except Torre. Obviously, Mattingly's baseball knowledge is not limited to his time by Torre's side, but surely his tactics are going to be heavily influenced by Torre. And that, while not being the worst thing in the world, is not anything to be excited about.

Then you have to ask yourself, is Mattingly the type of person who can nurture a clubhouse, who can make a team better when the game isn't going on?

I don't know Mattingly at all, so I'm not qualified to answer that question. But my concern is that Mattingly is being handed this job not because of any actual qualifications, but because he's perceived (hoped) to be Torre II. He'll continue Torre's winning ways just by having soaked up his innate Torreness.

If it were that simple, I don't think Laker fans would be concerned about Phil Jackson leaving.

As a counter-example, Tim Wallach has both coached on the major-league level and managed on the minor-league level for the Dodgers. He was named Pacific Coast League Manager of the Year in 2009. This season, he has been doing a barefoot walk across the coals, because the Dodgers' pitching problems have absolutely burned their top affiliate in Albuquerque. In this season alone, Wallach has had to use 17 starting pitchers this season in 74 games. He has very little in the way of top-rated AAA prospects right now. He has had to work without the safety net of a Joe Torre and then some.

This resume doesn't prove that Wallach will be a successful major-league manager. But I can't see how it isn't a better resume than Mattingly's, whose entire managerial C.V. consists of, "He's Don Mattingly, Yankee legend and student of Joe Torre."

As the Dodgers prepare to bid farewell to Torre, this year, next year or whenever, they have some responsibilities, some explicit, some implicit. For one thing, Major League Baseball requires the Dodgers to interview at least one minority candidate for the position. Whether you believe in this rule or not, I'd argue that the Dodgers should not make this interview a token activity, but rather at least one of a number of serious interviews, a wider exploration into whether anyone is better than Mattingly for the job. Clearly, Mattingly has impressed people in the organization, but has he done so in ways that really matter? If they pause and step back, are there not potential managers out there who would be more compelling?

By writing this piece, I risk giving this decision more importance than it deserves. The talent on the field is still more important than the talent in the dugout, and a hire of Mattingly isn't going to ruin the Dodgers. Mattingly is not Torre, and given what happened Sunday, some might say that's a good thing. But the Dodgers should ask themselves whether a Mattingly hire would bring continuity in all the wrong places.

Richard Drew/AP
Tim Wallach, shown here as a Dodger coach, has handled all kinds of challenges as Albuquerque's manager.

With the Albuquerque-Los Angeles shuttle in overdrive, I thought this might be a good time to check in with Robert Portnoy, friend of Dodger Thoughts and the play-by-play broadcaster for the Isotopes. And with that largely ado-free introduction, here's the interview:

1) First, can you update us on when we might see James McDonald and Scott Elbert back in action? What can you tell us about Elbert's situation?
I don't have anything to tell about Elbert's situation. He is not with the team and we haven't received word when he might return. McDonald's recovery from his hamstring strain is coming along well in Arizona. He has thrown a simulated game and is scheduled to make his first start in an Arizona League game. [Note: McDonald pitched two hitless innings Tuesday, after this interview was completed.] His return date is not set, but it's not too far off.

2) How is McDonald handling things in a year he probably thought he'd be in the majors? Especially when things just seemed to be coming together for him before he got hurt.
He was very disappointed when the injury occurred, that was evident. There's no doubt he was pitching better than he had all season at the time he went down. He was handling being in Triple-A quite well. He realized he had things to work on, and he made great strides. At the start of the year, A.J. Ellis told me J-Mac's changeup has always been his best secondary pitch, the one that's always there for him, his most reliable. J-Mac said his changeup was terrible at the start of the year. He was throwing it much better before the injury. His rehab has been exclusively in Arizona, so I can't comment on how he's handled that process.

3) The roster comings and goings have been endless. How crazy has it been, particularly in the Isotopes starting rotation? How does Tim Wallach handle it?
Wallach is as even-tempered as they come, unflappable. The kind of manager who watches a terrible base running mistake, pulls the player aside for a brief moment, asks if that player's aware what he should have done, then tells him to put it behind him so he can help win a ballgame. He realizes that the primary goal is get players ready to help the Dodgers, and if that leaves his rotation depleted, he'll adjust. The injuries to key guys don't help, obviously. Yesterday, big league veteran Tim Corcoran, a reliable starter since joining the rotation, had to leave his start early. We hope he won't miss a turn.

4) What do you think of Wallach as a managerial prospect?
Fantastic. He's a players manager who keeps proper distance and maintains full authority. One step ahead, it seems, all the time. When he pitches out, they're running. His instincts are great. Always gets the matchups he wants. One game I distinctly recall talking about multiple scenarios on the air, then asking him about them after the game. He discussed those and gave three or four others he had considered. He can play the chess game with the best of them.

5) Is it a relief to see Josh Lindblom moved to relief?
Josh has a tremendous head on his shoulders, and he's a real student of the game. Talks about Clemens, Halladay, Carpenter as starters he tries to emulate, even gave me a Goose Gossage reference when talking about his favorite closers (mentioned Goose getting six outs or more for many of his saves). I had a great conversation with him on our recent road trip in Iowa. Here's the thinking: He has been a reliever, has never even thrown 100 innings in a season. His arm isn't accustomed to logging that much work yet. So, the past two seasons he's gotten run down, lost his arm strength. I think he has the stuff, the fastball command, and the makeup to be a big league starter, a real innings-eater, IF his body can adapt. If not, he'll make an above-average middle innings or setup guy who can get you up to three innings because he has four quality pitches. He's a big leaguer for sure.

6) Are you able to see what weaknesses John Lindsey has to keep him from the majors? (And when will he return to the field?)
John might rejoin the team when we get back to Albuquerque this weekend, but he could still have a bit more rehab to do before getting back on the field. He has been recovering from his calf strain in Arizona. John's a professional hitter, he could help the Dodgers with his bat right now. He's not James Loney at first base, but he can hold his own. Defense might be the only thing that's holding him back.

7) Jay Gibbons is a potential lefty bat off the Dodger bench with major-league experience. What do you see as his strengths and weaknesses at this point in his career?
Gibbons' only weakness, if you can call it that, is how hard he plays. At 33, he still leaves it all out there every day. But as a lefty bat off the bench, there's no wear and tear. He would be ideal, because he could stay in the game and play either corner OF position or 1B adequately, and he'd be great for multiple ABs because he's actually BETTER against lefties than righties, the numbers don't lie. His bat is level through the hitting zone longer than anybody I've ever seen, period. And he threw two guys out on the bases from RF in one inning in Iowa last weekend.

8) Does Xavier Paul have anything left to prove in the minors? What is he working on?
No. He's an everyday big leaguer waiting for his chance. He's working on his defense constantly, looking to continue to improve in that area any way he can. His arm is unquestioned. Just in the last week, naive hitters have tried to stretch singles into doubles when he's playing left and paid the price twice. Strong and accurate thrower. RF arm in LF when he plays there. When he keeps his focus in the field, he's an above-average defensive OF. He has shown how he can hit when he's been with the Dodgers this year. He is tearing up PCL pitching, and now he's hitting for power, which adds the final piece.

9) How is Ivan DeJesus' comeback going?
Talked with Ivan in Iowa as well. He's still working to get strength back in the surgically repaired left leg. It's a process. He told me that his rehab was rushed a bit last year, when he first tried to run his leg wasn't ready. They had to shut him down and reset the timetable. He hasn't had any problems, though. Going very smoothly. He looks great, and his swing is terrific, uses right-center a lot, and can drive the ball that way. Best of all, he's already had multiple plays this year at home plate, where he's beaten throws with a variety of slides, and he says he doesn't think about the collision that caused the injury anymore.

10) Anyone under the radar on the Isotopes roster that you like?
There are several, but if I had to pick one, I'll go with Russ Mitchell. Has been solid at the plate all year, consistent approach, hits for average and power. Really impressive at 3B, good first step and strong arm, equally good going left, right, and coming in. And he can play 1B and 2B capably as well. He's even played OF in his career, though we haven't seen him there yet. But he's not a utility guy, I like him at 3B every day. He's the one keeping everybody loose, always talking, laughing. Clearly loves coming to the ballpark, loves what he's doing.

* * *

  • Claudio Vargas pitched 3 2/3 innings for Albuquerque on Tuesday, allowing two unearned runs on five baserunners with five strikeouts and throwing 77 pitches.
  • A step forward for Brent Leach? Converted into starting, Leach threw five shutout innings for Chattanooga, allowing four baserunners and striking out six.
  • Dodger farmhand Nathan Eovaldi allowed two runs in an inning of relief in the California League's 15th annual All-Star game against the Carolina League on Tuesday in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.
  • Dee Gordon and Pedro Baez will play in Sunday's Futures minor-league All-Star game at Anaheim Stadium. Baez was given a spot even though he's been on the disabled list in recent weeks.
  • A film about a Warren Cromartie-managed Japanese team on a 90-game road trip in California's independent Golden League, "Season of the Samurai," will premiere on the MLB Network at 4 p.m. Friday, reports Ben Bolch of the Times.
  • Jerry Manuel pulled a Joe Torre/Hiroki Kuroda with Jon Niese on Tuesday, and is getting grief for it.

* * *

For Dodger fans feeling down about the team's losing streak, this should cheer you up.
Steve Dilbeck questions the Dodgers' fascination with coach Don Mattingly over Albuquerque manager Tim Wallach at Dodgers Blog, and I can't say I don't share it — only I might frame as "Why Don Mattingly and no one else?"

The answer is that Mattingly would theoretically carry forward the success that Joe Torre has had, but should we really feel so certain that Mattingly, for better or worse, is Torre II?

Writes Dilbeck:
... Mattingly has never managed. Wallach, who led Albuquerque to the playoffs last season and was named the Pacific Coast League manager of the year, will return to the helm of the Isotopes this season.

Does any of this sound familiar? Echoes of Mike Scioscia, perhaps?

When Tommy Lasorda finally stepped down, the Dodgers named coach Bill Russell to succeed him in 1997. Scioscia was a bench coach. When Russell was ousted in the middle of the ’98 season, Glenn Hoffman was named manager. When Hoffman was fired at the end of the season, Davey Johnson took over.

Scioscia, who in 1999 managed at Albuquerque, was passed over one time too many, resigned and then went onto become one of baseball’s finest managers for the Angels. ...

... Wallach also said he sees no problem with Mattingly’s inexperience as a manager.

"He’s a baseball guy," Wallach said. "He’s been Torre’s bench coach. I mean, I can’t even imagine how much he’s learned being with Joe all these years. If that’s how it works, I got … he’s a baseball guy. I think he’ll be fantastic.

"I’m getting experience to someday hopefully manage (in the majors). I would love it to be here, but if it’s not here, I appreciate the opportunity. I love the Dodgers. I always come back to the Dodgers. But they’re giving me an opportunity and I’m very happy with the opportunity."


* * *


Heralded Cuban import Aroldis Chapman is scheduled to pitch for the Reds against the Dodgers at Camelback Ranch on Friday.

Update: Brian Giles has retired. Tony Jackson of ESPNLosAngeles.com has details.

SPONSORED HEADLINES

TEAM LEADERS

WINS LEADER
Clayton Kershaw
WINS ERA SO IP
21 1.77 239 198
OTHER LEADERS
BAY. Puig .296
HRA. Gonzalez 27
RBIA. Gonzalez 116
RY. Puig 92
OPSY. Puig .863
ERAC. Kershaw 1.77
SOC. Kershaw 239