Los Angeles Lakers: Deron Williams

Lakers vs. Nets: What to watch

November, 20, 2012
11/20/12
10:09
AM PT
Kamenetzky By Andy Kamenetzky
ESPNLosAngeles.com
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A historical footnote is in the making, as tonight marks the first meeting between the Los Angeles Lakers and the newly face-lifted Brooklyn Nets. These ain't your daddy's Nets anymore, with the presence of Russian billionaire Mikhail Prokhorov and rap icon/multi-hyphenate Jay-Z, the Barclays Center and a hipster locale to call home. Oh, and the roster isn't half bad, either. Maybe not worth the price tag, but certainly formidable, and definitive proof of the commitment to make the Knicks paranoid about a sea change in New York.

It remains to be seen who'll be on the sideline coaching the Lakers tonight, but whether its Mike D'Antoni or Bernie Bickerstaff, the Lakers will look to maintain their momentum and tighten up the execution on both sides of the ball. Here are three things to be mindful of once the ball is jumped.

1. Will the Lakers' high-octane offense continue to explode?
Take a cursory glance at the numbers and you'll see 92.5 points a night surrendered by Brooklyn, the sixth-lowest in the NBA. On the surface, they would appear quite the defensive juggernaut. However, a little more digging shows an opponent field goal percentage of 45.3 percent, tumbling the Nets well into the bottom third of the league when it comes to protecting the basket. How are these intertwined, yet polar opposite findings possible? Well, tonight's visitors play like their offense is being quarterbacked by a snail. The NBA's fourth-slowest pace means fewer possessions, which means fewer opportunities for the enemy to score. In other words, the Nets are plodding their way to smaller point totals for the opposition, rather than achieving through maximum lockdown.

Looking at the Nets' roster, this isn't surprising. Save Gerald Wallace, no member of the starting five will likely gun for any Defensive Player of the Year votes. Joe Johnson's best days sticking a wing scorer are behind him. Deron Williams and Kris Humphries are somewhere between "average" and "decent enough not to kill you." And Brook Lopez has been a train wreck defensively his entire career. Off the bench, rebounding savant Reggie Evans is more of an energetic defender than a truly effective one, MarShon Brooks is inexperienced and Andray Blatche's indifference to lockdown is in part what prompted the Wizards' decision to use the amnesty clause on him.

Thus, the Nets' best approach for keeping points low is manufacturing a crawl, and for the first time in eons, the Lakers won't play along. During this D'Bickerstaff era, the Lakers haven't necessarily become a fast-break factory, but they're no longer the methodically slow squad Brooklyn would prefer to face. Removed from a comfort zone, I don't expect the Nets to keep an opponent in the low 90s. For that matter, it'll be interesting to see if they can simply remain effective at keeping the Lakers off the line, a spot where Kobe and Company have taken frequent residence this season.

2. Who defends Deron Williams?
By his standards, the Nets' franchise face is off to a slow start. Whether gauged through points, field goal percentages from the field or the arc, assists or rebounds, D-Will is putting up numbers below his career clips, figures that aren't necessarily indicative of playing for a team with more talent and more statistical wealth spread about. However, he's still Deron Freakin' Williams, meaning the odds favor him remaining a handful even if he's still in the process of feeling out a new roster. With that in mind, it'll be interesting to see who spends the majority of minutes checking the three-time All-Star.

As I noted in Sunday's Rapid Reaction, Darius Morris' rapid improvement hasn't just been notable while running the offense. The kid's demonstrating fine defensive instincts, in particular his understanding of how to use his big body. But Williams is the rare point guard who doesn't surrender size to Morris and has a vast edge in veteran smarts. If Morris struggles, could Chris Duhon, who's played solid-if-unspectacular minutes with the Steves out, handle extended minutes against D-Will? And can the Lakers handle Duhon in extended minutes? He may be a credible enough defender, but his presence limits the overall dynamism of the offense. Does the answer perhaps lie within the starting lineup? Metta World Peace can certainly bully Williams physically, and those vice-grip hands can induce turnovers from even the most elite point guards. But will his feet cooperate? If he's not fast enough to stay with Williams, the challenge could fall on Kobe.

In the past, the Lakers have looked to avoid extended periods latching Kobe to such a difficult assignment, given the scoring burden additionally shouldered. But given how judiciously Kobe's letting shots fly this season, that energy may not require as much preservation. Maybe we'll see the Mamba go at Williams throughout the closing minutes, which would obviously be fun.

3. Dwight Howard vs. Brook Lopez
Yeah, that Brook Lopez. The one Shaquille O'Neal famously/ridiculously presented as better than Howard. The Diesel's analysis clearly wasn't appreciated by Dwight, but he responded by reminding Shaq that he's currently out to pasture, rather than taking any shots at Lopez. No need to drag the twin any further into this mess. Still, Howard's willingness to take the verbal high road needn't necessarily bleed onto the hardwood. I wouldn't be surprised if Howard looks to prove the inanity of O'Neal's comments by launching a full-blown assault at Lopez's expense.

Howard puts Brooklyn in the rearview

November, 19, 2012
11/19/12
3:19
PM PT
McMenamin By Dave McMenamin
ESPNLosAngeles.com
Archive
EL SEGUNDO, Calif. -- With all the drama surrounding the Los Angeles Lakers since the start of training camp -- from a winless preseason, to Steve Nash getting hurt, Mike Brown being fired, Phil Jackson being spurned and Mike D'Antoni being hired -- Dwight Howard has flown relatively under the radar.

It wasn't too long ago that Howard's name couldn't stay out of the headlines as his exit from Orlando played out in the press. The All-Star center's situation became commonly referred to as the "Dwightmare."

Howard's inspired play just six months removed from back surgery has helped people move on from the soap opera that surrounded him during the summer. He is averaging 20 points (60.8 percent shooting), 11.4 rebounds and 2.7 blocks through the Lakers' first 10 games. However, with the Brooklyn Nets coming to town to play the Lakers this week, Howard was reminded Monday about his supposed preferred destination.

"I’m here now," Howard said after practice Monday, a day before the Lakers host the visiting Nets at Staples Center. "I’m in L.A. There’s no need to talk about what could have happened. I’m happy with being here in L.A. Like I’ve said, the fans have always been great here, and now that I’m on the team, the fans from Day 1, they’ve just been unbelievable to me and to this team. So I’m just happy about that."

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PodKast: The draft, free agency and tampering

July, 3, 2012
7/03/12
12:29
PM PT
Kamenetzky By Andy Kamenetzky
ESPNLosAngeles.com
Archive
We recorded this show between the draft and free agency's official start, a few days ahead of the Nets' dramatic, Dwight Howard-free makeover. Obviously, the NBA landscape has already dramatically changed, but the topics and concerns expressed remain as relevant. That's just how talented BK and I are.

The podcast can be heard by clicking on the module, and a list of talking points can seen below:



Play Download

- (2:05): We break down the Lakers' draft haul (Darius Johnson-Odom, Robert Sacre), along with Mitch Kupchak's attempts to move up in the draft. Shockingly, his attempt to move small forward/Vancouver weatherman/Twitter addict Metta World Peace for a first-round draft pick bore no fruit. For that matter, an attempt to move Gasol for a high pick and established talent left the Lakers at square one.

- (12:00): Free agency is underway and the Lakers will be weighing options. Unfortunately, those choices are quite limited, making their own guys (Ramon Sessions, Jordan Hill, Devin Ebanks) the most realistic priority. In particular, Sessions will be difficult to replace on the open market, even acknowledging his weaknesses.

- (18:47): Bottom line, how much better can the front office really make the Lakers next season? And how will fans react if the answer is "not much?" After all, it's hard to question the commitment, whether by money spent or results, toward winning over the last few seasons. Either way, how will Kobe Bryant handle potentially playing the next two seasons on a team that's competitive, but not a legitimate contender?

- (24:30): What's up with all these top names (Deron Williams, Dwight Howard, Steve Nash) seemingly disinclined to join the Lakers?

- (29:18): With Dirk Nowitzki publicly recruiting D.Will to join the Mavericks while still technically a Net, we debate what constitutes "tampering."

Has the Dwight Howard calculus changed for the Lakers?

July, 2, 2012
7/02/12
4:48
PM PT
Kamenetzky By Brian Kamenetzky
ESPNLosAngeles.com
Archive
As the Dwight Howard saga rages on, one thing has gone from pretty much obvious to abundantly so: Howard wants to go to Brooklyn, and only Brooklyn.

So with that in mind, are the Lakers in better shape now to bring him to Los Angeles?

Very possibly.

As ESPN.com's John Hollinger notes (Insider required), thanks to months' worth of wishy-washiness and poor execution culminating in his decision last spring not to enter free agency this summer, Howard's master plan appears to be crumbling around him. And that was before this afternoon's bombshell: The Nets have a deal in place to acquire Joe Johnson from Atlanta. Setting aside for a moment the wisdom of the trade from Brooklyn's perspective -- while Johnson is a very good player, he's south of elite, north of 30 years old, and due an astonishing $90 mil over the next four years -- his addition combined with the re-signing of Deron Williams (they hope) and a re-signed Gerald Wallace would reportedly shut the door on Howard in Brooklyn. As for a trade with the Nets, if the Magic wanted some sort of package built around Brook Lopez and MarShon Brooks, it would have happened by now.

As one source told ESPN.com, "Dwight blew it in March."

Howard made it clear the Nets were the only team with whom he'd sign an extension in a trade, a threat designed to keep other teams from making a deal with Orlando. Now his one-and-only destination appears to have denied him an entry visa. For the Lakers, that completely changes the calculus surrounding a potential Howard-for-Andrew Bynum swap. Before, the risk of sacrificing Bynum only to see Howard bolt after one season to the place he said all along he wanted to go was a lot to stomach. Without Brooklyn in play, it's a different ballgame. Suddenly, the idea of making a career with the Lakers becomes an easier sell, particularly since if they did swing a trade, L.A. would have the ability to give Howard far more money than anyone else.

The Lakers would have a much easier time calling Howard's bluff at the end of next year. A max deal combined with some winning, excellent weather, and no better option makes for a decent Plan B.

From Orlando's perspective, Bynum still constitutes the single best player they'd get in return for Howard, and while (just as the Lakers would with Howard) the Magic would have to sign him to an extension, I don't see it as a problem. Remember, it was in reference to Orlando-centric trade rumors Bynum made his famous "bank in every city" quote. While I've never sensed he's hell-bent on leaving the Lakers, Bynum has also always given the impression he'd get over a trade in about 17 seconds.

There would still be plenty of potential peril. The Lakers won't be the only organization recognizing a new opportunity. Other teams, Dallas for example if they lose out on D-Will or (Howard's hometown) Atlanta now that Johnson and Marvin Williams have been cleared away, could jimmy around their rosters to make enough space to sign Howard outright after next season. Some wonder if so much sacrifice for a guy who appeared not to want to come to Los Angeles, and reportedly wasn't high on playing second fiddle to Kobe Bryant, is worth it. There's a good chance he could leave.

Character wise, Howard has turned many off by the way he's morphed his exit from Orlando into a soap opera. Remember, too, he's coming off major back surgery.

On the other hand, assuming he's healthy, Howard is a dominant force in ways Bynum isn't yet. As a rule, in the NBA when you have a chance to pick up a top-five player, you do it and ask questions later. The other stuff can and likely will be forgiven, at least locally, if Howard helps push the Lakers back to the Finals. Talent is the ultimate olive branch.

Now that it appears he might have to settle for his less-favored options, it makes much more sense for the Lakers to push harder for a deal with Orlando, even if Howard won't sign an extension right away. The Lakers can more successfully call his bluff.

"Where are you going to go, Dwight?"

Would he have a good answer?

A purple-and-gold crossroads for Kobe and the Lakers?

July, 1, 2012
7/01/12
11:37
AM PT
Kamenetzky By Andy Kamenetzky
ESPNLosAngeles.com
Archive
Even for fans harking back to the days of West, Baylor and Wilt, it's probably hard to think about the Lakers without Kobe Bryant. Next season will be his 17th with the franchise, the longest any player has donned a Lakers uniform. During this time, he has been synonymous with championships. The five he has won. Two additional trips to the Finals. Even his arrival came with banners and parades in mind. Even with the Shaq deal in the works, trading a center like Vlade Divac for a high school kid's draft rights was unheard of in 1996. You don't make that move without picturing Bryant as a primary piece of a championship squad reasonably soon. It was a marriage of player and franchise bonded by a mutual obsession with winning. Both sides consider championships not just a goal but the standard. Anything less, as Kobe said after his 2011 exit interview, would be "a wasted year of my life."

Nathaniel S. Butler/NBAE/Getty Images
Thankfully, Kobe didn't wear that Hornets hat very long.



However, there is the mission statement, and there is reality.

In reality, no team wins it all every year.

In reality, the new CBA will make it near impossible to win the "Lakers way," which has largely involved a willingness to spend. Obviously, success doesn't come purely by shelling out bucks like a drunken sailor. You have to spend wisely, and the players have to make good on that investment. The Knicks have proved beyond any shadow of a doubt that you can't just purchase titles. But there's no question that money had a hand in that success, and life as a luxury-tax-paying team will soon become exceptionally punitive.

And in reality, the Lakers as currently constructed aren't legitimate contenders, despite (knowingly false) claims from vice president of player personnel Jim Buss or general manager Mitch Kupchak. What's more, any fix will be difficult. They have a mini midlevel and veteran's minimum money available for free agents. Pau Gasol, Andrew Bynum and a theoretically signed-and-traded Ramon Sessions are the only assets of any discernible value, and it's debatable how much they'd fetch in return. (There's also the Lamar Odom trade exception, but who knows whether they'd actually use it.) Derrick Williams as a potential centerpiece for Gasol doesn't necessarily make the Lakers much better, at least for now. Josh Smith and Andre Iguodala pop up in rumors, but the talk doesn't seem to be gaining much traction. And players like Steve Nash, Dwight Howard and Deron Williams seemingly have no interest in donning purple and gold (which in and of itself feels like a paradigm shift).

Plus, if we're being honest with ourselves, Kobe's mammoth contract does the Lakers no favors. Whether you think he's ridiculously overpaid, criminally underpaid or paid accordingly, Bryant's salary made team-building difficult under the old CBA, much less the new one. Bryant also remains a high-end player, but his age is showing, whether judged by athleticism, burst or increased propensity for injury. He's no longer able to regularly take over games, particularly down the stretch, in an effective, efficient manner. (That's not to say he's incapable, but would you bet big money on a favorable result?) Yes, German wunder-science helped his legs, and I expect similarly springy results to begin this season after this summer's scheduled procedure. But I also expect the grind to catch up with Kobe, just as it did in 2011-12. Bottom line, he'll be 34 in his 17th season, and with playoff games included, Kobe has logged nearly the equivalent mileage of a 20-year veteran. A cyborg wouldn't be impervious to that much pounding, much less a mamba.

Like it or not, it's fair to wonder whether a team with Bryant as the clear focal point still can win a title. Or whether actively continuing to build around Kobe, no questions asked, is still best for the Lakers as a franchise moving forward.

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Auto Draft

June, 21, 2012
6/21/12
7:29
AM PT
Kamenetzky By Andy Kamenetzky
ESPNLosAngeles.com
Archive

Lakers chat transcript

June, 20, 2012
6/20/12
9:12
AM PT
By the Kamenetzky Brothers
ESPNLosAngeles.com
Archive
Whew! It was an active room today, with plenty of conversation about next week's draft, Ramon Sessions, free agency, and fresh comments from Jim Buss indicating the Lakers might be cool with what they have. So are they?

Click here for the transcript and find out.

Ramon Sessions will become a free agent

June, 19, 2012
6/19/12
12:03
PM PT
Kamenetzky By Brian Kamenetzky
ESPNLosAngeles.com
Archive
The list of players under contract with the Lakers is a little smaller. As ESPNLA's Dave McMenamin reports, point guard Ramon Sessions , has declined to exercise his player option for next season, worth $4.55 million, and will instead become an unrestricted free agent.

The decision isn't unexpected. Before the playoffs, reports (later denied by Sessions at his exit interview) indicated an inclination to hit the market, and given how he played in the first few weeks after arriving in L.A. it seemed like a good idea. A disappointing postseason in which he shot 37.7 percent from the floor and 16 percent from downtown injected a little uncertainty into the mix, but Sessions clearly believes his market value wasn't badly damaged and that opportunities for a good long term contract are still out there.


Garrett W. Ellwood/NBAE/Getty Images
Ramon Sessions will become a free agent, but that doesn't mean his Lakers career is over.


Including one from the Lakers. While he no longer has any contractual ties to the purple and gold, today's news definitely doesn't close the book on Sessions in Los Angeles. Mitch Kupchak repeatedly, including at his exit interview, said the Lakers acquired Sessions with the idea of keeping him, knowing full well he might end up on the open market this summer. Sessions said he wants to come back, too, and because the Lakers have Bird rights on him, they can re-sign Sessions despite being well over the salary cap threshold.

Whether Sessions is a Laker next year seems largely dependent on two big factors:
  • Price. The bottom line is, not surprisingly, the bottom line. They want him back, but the Lakers aren't going to open the vault for Sessions, overpaying by millions just to keep him around. If another franchise decides they badly want into the Ramon Sessions business and is willing to back it up with a big, big check, the Lakers won't stand in their way.
  • Trades. The need for Sessions lessens (rhyme!) if the Lakers trade either Pau Gasol or Andrew Bynum for a superior point guard, whether at the elite level (think Deron Williams) or a tick below (a Kyle Lowry type). On the other hand, should the Lakers be unable/unwilling to swing such a deal or decide to address other needs in a swap, the need to retain Sessions increases substantially. Steve Blake is now the only point guard under contract. Darius Morris is a restricted free agent and the Lakers are expected to bring him back, but he's not someone they can count on for big minutes next season. While some fans are definitely down on Sessions, there's no way they can afford anyone as good with a mini mid-level exception. If he goes, the Lakers could once again have a massive hole at point guard, but with fewer assets available to fill it than a year ago.
Not good. The Lakers essentially gave up two first round draft picks plus Derek Fisher, no small consideration for a team short on trade chips, meaning unless they swing a trade making Sessions more an afterthought, there will be significant motivation to find common ground with Team Sessions in the weeks to come.

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Chat transcript

June, 13, 2012
6/13/12
8:38
AM PT
By The Kamenetzky Brothers
ESPNLosAngeles.com
Archive
As I expected, lotta questions about potential offseason moves. Pau Gasol? Andrew Bynum? Steve Blake? Could all these guys be relocated?

Click here to relive the discussion.

The Forum: Ramon Sessions and the Lakers

June, 11, 2012
6/11/12
8:41
AM PT
Kamenetzky By Andy Kamenetzky
ESPNLosAngeles.com
Archive
Ramon Sessions has until June 20 to decide whether to exercise his player option for the final year of his contract or test free agency. Is it in the Lakers' best interests for the point guard to stick around for another campaign? Kevin Arnovitz, Dave McMenamin and I debate the question.video

Chat transcript

June, 6, 2012
6/06/12
8:15
AM PT
By the Kamenetzky Brothers
ESPNLosAngeles.com
Archive
So many questions about the trade value of "Laker X" or the free agents potentially pursued this offseason. So little time.

Here's the link to the room.

Chat transcript!

May, 30, 2012
5/30/12
10:12
AM PT
By the Kamenetzky Brothers
ESPNLosAngeles.com
Archive
With Mitch Kupchak having made clear change is on the horizon if humanly possible, there was a lot of chat chatter about possible trade scenarios. Predictably, there were sensible proposals put before us, plus a fair share of nonsense incredibly lopsided in the Lakers' favor.

For a look at the good and the bad, here's the link to the room.
Four years ago this summer, Kobe Bryant and Chris Paul were two of 12 NBA players determined to restore America's standing as the worldwide kings of basketball. In a classic game against Spain (featuring none other than Pau Gasol), Team USA won the gold and showed fans how a team of elite superstars can push egos to the side for the sake of a larger goal.

With Lakers-Clippers on the docket this evening
, various ESPN scribes (including the K Bros) gathered thoughts from Bryant's and Paul's Olympic teammates and coaches about the experience of working with them. Click here to make a patriotic trip down Memory Lane, and below are excerpts with Kobe's and Paul's recollections about one another:

Kobe on Paul: He's tough. He's tough as nails, man; he doesn't back down from anything or anybody. I'd never been as close to him, but when I was [on the Olympic team] I'd try to challenge him, see what he's made of and he's a tough little sucker.

Paul on Kobe: Me and Kob really figured out how much we had in common on that trip. That Olympic experience is when we got a lot closer. Me and my wife send him Christmas cards and his family sends us Christmas cards, and now we talk on a regular basis. We both want to win so badly. It's one of those things where as great a relationship as we have, as long as we're playing on the same court against each other, we're always going to get into it, you know what I mean? That's the respect factor, because you know that he wants it just as bad as I do.

Rapid Reaction: Lakers 91, Nets 87

April, 3, 2012
4/03/12
10:16
PM PT
Kamenetzky By Andy Kamenetzky
ESPNLosAngeles.com
Archive
The Lakers built a big first half lead. The Lakers lost a big first half lead. The Lakers won a tight contest made incredibly more complicated than necessary. Lather, rinse, repeat.

Here are three takeaways.

1) Ramon Sessions and Kobe Bryant capitalized on the ball residing in Sessions' hands more often.
Ever since being promoted to the starting unit, the opportunities for Sessions to operate as a true floor general have fluctuated. In particular, the balance between him and Kobe Bryant has proved difficult to discover. Both have claimed to be working off the ball more than they're used to. And while that may be the case at times, with all due respect to The Mamba, he may not be working off the ball quite as often as it may feel like to him. Tonight, however, Bryant truly worked away from the rock, especially during the first half, often fed for catch-and-shoots or a prime spot for attacking off the wing. Bryant took just 16 shots, largely of the effortless variety, and scored his 24 points with primo efficiency.

Some detractors will dismiss this as a ball hog simply doing what any selfless player would do, but working so often without the rock constitutes a genuine adjustment on Kobe's part. Giving and working outside a comfort zone is required, and tonight he did just that. Thus, it actually felt appropriate that the Mamba would end up once again the hero after rattling in the game-icing 3-pointer with ticks remaining on the clock. Well, it actually felt inappropriate, since such a shot should never have been necessary in the first place. But you know what I mean.

As for Sessions, his 19-point, 11-assist double-double nicely combined self-created jumpers and forays to the rim, plus a healthy dose of smart passes. In particular, I liked a first quarter sequence where Sessions, running the ball upcourt, spotted Pau Gasol in the lane with a defender attached to him. Both exhibited good patience and waited until Gasol's man left to help on the approaching point guard. Sessions casually dumped the ball over the top to El Spaniard who threw down a quick dunk before the weakside help arrived. Neither player in question seemed to break a sweat, and it was a treat to watch such smart basketball.

Obviously, against a better team with a credible defense, unison between the guards won't come as easily. But games with the emphasis on this division of labor have been few and far between of late. Practice can hopefully make perfect, even when the reps come against inferior competition.

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Lakers vs. Nets: What to Watch

April, 3, 2012
4/03/12
9:51
AM PT
Kamenetzky By Andy Kamenetzky
ESPNLosAngeles.com
Archive
Stop me if you've heard this one before, but it would be nice to witness the Lakers play a strong game wire-to-wire. I don't necessarily mean flawless (although I won't look a gift masterpiece in the mouth), but strong. Strong in overall execution. Strong in overall defense. And most importantly, strong in overall effort. You have to go back to March 21 in Dallas for the most recent evidence of when the Lakers were dialed in from start to finish. Since then, the collective focus has mimicked a roller coaster. Against inferior and top-shelf competition alike, the Lakers suffer stretches where they appear to be going through the motions.

Which brings us to tonight's game with New Jersey. While they may be 19-35, Brooklyn's future franchise is on a three-game winning streak, the last two coming on the road. And that should come as no surprise, since they're actually much more proficient outside of the Garden State. They have an elite point guard, an upper-echelon small forward and Lamar Odom's ex-brother-in-law -- which must count for something, right? In other words, take NJ too lightly, especially the way the Lakers have played of late, and this carries the potential for disappointment, even with a W at the end of the night.

For some Nets-ian knowledge, we called upon Devin Kharpertian of the True Hoop network's Nets Are Scorching blog. Below are his responses to a quartet of questions.

Nathaniel S. Butler/Getty Images
It's the hard knock life for Jay-Z watching his Nets in person.



Land O' Lakers: The Nets have been better away from their arena. Why do you think that is, and what, if anything, tends to change in the way they play on the road?

Devin Kharpertian: The players blame the arena, as the cold weather conditions and sight lines come from an arena built for hockey. What they won't blame is the cold conditions from those watching in the arena; the Nets "boast" the worst attendance figures per game in the league, and fans range from the few die-hard rabids to the casually indifferent corporate season ticket holders. For the "Jersey Strong, Brooklyn Ready" Nets, there's hardly a home-court advantage.

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SPONSORED HEADLINES

TEAM LEADERS

POINTS
Kobe Bryant
PTS AST STL MIN
24.6 4.9 1.4 35.4
OTHER LEADERS
ReboundsJ. Hill 8.3
AssistsK. Bryant 4.9
StealsR. Price 1.4
BlocksE. Davis 1.2