Los Angeles Lakers: Trade Rumors

Dwupdate: Orlando to hold Howard for now?

July, 23, 2012
7/23/12
7:58
PM PT
Kamenetzky By Brian Kamenetzky
ESPNLosAngeles.com
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Reports ESPN The Magazine's Chris Broussard:
"The Orlando Magic have told rival executives that they might not trade Dwight Howard after all, according to league sources.

An executive who has had discussions with the Magic regarding Howard said Orlando only will trade the star center in a deal that is great for the franchise. The executive said this has been Orlando's stance for the past "week or so." Another executive who has talked with Orlando said he thinks the Magic may start the season with Howard and wait until the February trade deadline to move him.

Each executive left the door open for posturing, noting that the Magic may be bluffing in hopes of coaxing better offers out of opposing teams. But the overriding sense is that Howard may not be moved for weeks, if not months."

Translation: Orlando hopes (as you'd expect) to extract as much from this deal as possible, and (at least outwardly and publicly) won't be pushed into what they feel is a less-than-appropriate return on Howard in the service of expediency.

(Read full post)

Sources: Dwight Howard willing to stay in L.A. if traded

July, 19, 2012
7/19/12
9:47
AM PT
Kamenetzky By Brian Kamenetzky
ESPNLosAngeles.com
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The news, first reported by Real GM's Jerrod Rudolph and confirmed by ESPN The Magazine's Chris Broussard, certainly represents a new turn in the Everlasting Gobstopper that is the Dwight Howard trade saga. If traded to the Lakers, sources say Howard is open to signing a long-term extension following the 2012-13 season. (Thanks to provisions in the new CBA, doing it at the time the trade is executed costs him tens of millions, so nothing would be inked until next summer.)


Gary A. Vasquez/US Presswire
Dwight Howard is apparently willing to stay in L.A. if traded to the Lakers, but that doesn't necessarily make a deal easier to facilitate.


It's a great headline, but what does it mean for the prospects of actually bringing Howard to town?

Not all that much, really. Signaling a willingness to stick around long term obviously removes one potential spot of worry from the Lakers' end and allows them to move forward with more confidence, except it wasn't that concern holding up a deal. The Lakers have been willing to pull the trigger even without such assurances from Howard, confident they could keep him through a combination of championship culture, fringe benefits to living in Los Angeles, and the extra money they'd be able to offer by holding his Bird rights. So while it's nice for Howard to point to L.A. as a preferred (or at least acceptable) destination, as the Nets can attest, Dwight doesn't always get what Dwight wants. If Orlando isn't interested in Andrew Bynum as a return for Howard, the Lakers and Magic still need to find another team, maybe more than one, to build a package of young talent, draft picks, and cap space attractive enough for the Magic to accept.

Maybe that team is Cleveland or Houston, or perhaps the Lakers can draw another squad into the talks, but for the time being, at least, the Magic seem willing to be picky. Would the newest incarnation of a trade, sending Bynum to Cleveland and a package of picks and Anderson Varejao to Orlando be enough? Probably not considering what the Magic have already turned down. In the short term, constructing a deal might even get harder, because while the Lakers aren't desperate in their Howard chase -- they would be perfectly willing to enter the season with Bynum as their center -- teams might demand a little more to help facilitate a trade if they believe the pressure is on L.A. in the wake of Howard's new outlook.

The news seems to give Bynum a lot more leverage, as well. He could in theory kill a deal by sending signals he'd be unlikely to re-sign in his new city once the season is over. (Like Howard, Bynum costs himself too much money in an extend-and-trade to sign early with his new team.)

Point being, there's a lot of work left to do.

So while last night's development is certainly significant and definitely increases the likelihood of a successful post-trade relationship between Howard and the Lakers in which he becomes the franchise's post-Kobe Bryant cornerstone, from a practical standpoint it doesn't actually change much. The Lakers are still positioned very well to get Howard and can still afford to be relatively patient, but also still have to construct a trade with which the Magic are, if not comfortable, at least willing to take.

Sources: Lakers trade Derek Fisher

March, 15, 2012
3/15/12
12:58
PM PT
Kamenetzky By Brian Kamenetzky
ESPNLosAngeles.com
Archive
Wow. Didn't see this one coming.

The Lakers have traded Derek Fisher to Houston for forward Jordan Hill. In addition, they will send the pick acquired from Dallas in the Lamar Odom deal to the Rockets. The eighth selection in the '09 draft, Hill is an athletic 4/5 who can finish on the break, rebound, and block shots, but doesn't create his own offense or stretch the floor. He's a young asset, and in his third season has had some strong moments in the league. How he fits into the rotation is an open question, though he certainly could see minutes backing up both Pau Gasol and Andrew Bynum and could prove a very handy fellow to have around. Then again, he might not play much.

But Hill is not the news, here.

Derek Fisher hasn't been productive for a while now, and with the acquisition of Ramon Sessions becomes completely superfluous, and even a potential political problem in the Lakers locker room. L.A.'s ideal rotation at the point would have Sessions playing starters minutes with Steve Blake backing him up. That would leave Fisher on the bench, a place where he (understandably) wouldn't be happy. It would be a horrible setup, very difficult for Mike Brown to manage effectively. In the cold business of the NBA, you trade guys who can't help you but still cost money now and down the line, and that's what this is. The Lakers have no obligation to Hill next season, but would have owed Fisher over three million.

It's something that had to happen, but nonetheless feels strange.

On the court, frankly the Lakers lose very little losing Fisher. The transition comes is in the locker room. Beyond being Kobe Bryant's most trusted ally, Fisher was the ballast to Kobe incredibly strong personality. With Fisher gone, it will be interesting to see how Kobe changes his leadership style to accommodate the change, and who steps up into the leadership void. The natural candidate is Gasol, who moves up a rung on the locker room ladder. How this impacts his dynamic with Kobe will be something interesting to watch.

The bottom line is the Lakers, on a day where they have improved themselves significantly on the floor, also have set themselves up for a major adjustment off it.

Sources: Lakers closer to acquiring Michael Beasley

March, 15, 2012
3/15/12
12:14
AM PT
Kamenetzky By Brian Kamenetzky
ESPNLosAngeles.com
Archive
ESPNLA's Dave McMenamin has the story:
"The Lakers revisited talks to acquire Minnesota Timberwolves forward Michael Beasley on Wednesday, multiple league sources told ESPNLosAngeles.com. Several variations of the trade have been discussed. One would land Beasley on the Lakers in a three-team deal that would send Portland Trail Blazers guard Jamal Crawford to the Wolves and Luke Ridnour from Minnesota to Portland. Los Angeles would give up one of its two 2012 first round draft picks in the deal and use its $8.9 million trade exception, acquired when it traded Lamar Odom to the Dallas Mavericks in December, to absorb Beasley's approximate $6.3 million salary. Portland would also receive the Lakers' first round pick.

As of late Wednesday night no deal was completed, but a source familiar with the negotiations said, "the sides have momentum."


The Oregonian earlier reported another version of the deal without Ridnour and including Lakers guard Steve Blake who played three seasons for the Blazers from 2007-2010 and who still keeps his offseason home in Oregon. Blake played 18 minutes in the Lakers' 107-101 overtime victory over the New Orleans Hornets on Wednesday, however, and told reporters before the game, "I'm still here," but did not speak to the media after the game."

Beasley would definitely add a huge dose of scoring punch to the bench, at both forward positions. Obviously, though, there's a huge difference between a deal sending Blake out and one in which the Lakers absorb Beasley in their cap exception. If Blake goes, the Lakers almost certainly have to acquire another point guard or be left with a rotation of Derek Fisher, Andrew Goudelock, and Darius Morris. That won't get it done.

Either way, with 12 hours left before the deadline, things appear to be percolating.

Howard says he wants to stay in Orlando through the season

March, 14, 2012
3/14/12
8:57
AM PT
Kamenetzky By Brian Kamenetzky
ESPNLosAngeles.com
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UPDATE (10:41 am PT)- ESPN The Magazine's Chris Broussard reports the Magic are, in the wake of Howard's comments last night, more open to moving him unless he makes some sort of commitment to Orlando. "Dwight Howard's public plea late Tuesday to remain in Orlando for the rest of the season has only served to anger the Magic and has instead pushed them closer than ever to trading their superstar center, according to league sources with knowledge of the situation," writes Broussard. While I suspect any deal would likely land him with New Jersey -- I can't imagine a team like the Lakers giving up real value absent a commitment from Howard not likely coming -- it looks like Howard's comments may have goosed the trade market in a few ways.)

The ever-developing developing Dwight Howard story developed ever more Tuesday night, when after the Magic beat Miami in Orlando, the All-Star center said he hopes not to move before Thursday's trade deadline. Reports ESPN.com's Michael Wallace:
"Howard, who is in the middle of wide-ranging trade speculation, said he has talked with Magic owner Rich DeVos and other front-office executives about his desire to stay for the past two weeks. But Howard would not commit to signing a long-term contract extension and could opt out of his deal to enter free agency in the summer.

"We've been talking, like I said, for a while," Howard said after leading the Magic to a 104-98 overtime home victory against the Miami Heat. "I told them I want to finish this season out and give our team, give our fans some hope for the future. But I feel they have to roll the dice. It might be tough, but I feel we've got a great opportunity. But they've got to roll it."

This benefits a few people. First, LeBron James, because even he of "taking my talents" fame cringed at Howard's horrendous "roll the dice" line. It also benefits Howard, since the prevailing opinion is he wants to stay only so he can then opt out in July, and sign with a more fully stocked Nets team.

The Lakers haven't seemed like true players in the Howard sweepstakes in a while, but his comments Tuesday night could add some clarity to the hours leading up to the deadline and serve to loosen up what has to this point been a pretty quiet market. If teams still interested in Howard (and by extension, teams waiting on teams still interested) feel he's staying put for now and the jump to Brooklyn is inevitable, they can start looking at respective plan B's more earnestly.

The Forum: L.A. turns down Beasley, looking ahead at the deadline

March, 2, 2012
3/02/12
9:47
AM PT
By the Kamenetzky Brothers
ESPNLosAngeles.com
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Dave McMenamin joins us as we answer a pair of questions:

Report: Lakers reject offer for Michael Beasley

February, 29, 2012
2/29/12
4:21
PM PT
Kamenetzky By Brian Kamenetzky
ESPNLosAngeles.com
Archive
After he dropped 27 points on the Clippers last night, we were hit with a ton of tweets and questions in today's chat about when the Lakers would bring in Timberwolves forward Michael Beasley. According to ESPN The Magazine's Chris Broussard, apparently they already could have, but passed, rejecting an offer from Minnesota of Beasley for a first-round draft pick. The second pick of the 2008 draft makes just over $6.2 million this season, but could have been absorbed into the trade exception created by the Lakers in the Lamar Odom deal.

There are any number of totally valid reasons the Lakers wouldn't bite, despite an acute need for help at small forward and additional scoring punch. They could be frightened by Beasley's questionable maturity, or negative aspects of his game, and believe he's a bad fit. Maybe they prefer other targets, and need that pick to make a different deal. Perhaps, as some suspect, they're holding on to every asset they have until Dwight Howard and/or Deron Williams have signed new contracts, even if it means standing pat into the summer.

What will frighten fans, though, is the one cited by Broussard -- money:
"...With one of the league's highest payrolls at roughly $88 million -- well above the luxury tax threshold of $70 million -- the Lakers are due to pay $18 million in taxes this season. Since there is a dollar-for-dollar penalty for tax-paying teams, taking on Beasley's $6.2 million contract would add another $6.2 million to their tax bill and cost the Lakers an extra $12.4 million.

The Lakers' decision falls in line with their decision to trade Lamar Odom to the Dallas Mavericks for an $8.9 million trade exception in December. While Odom asked to be traded after finding out the Lakers put him in a foiled trade attempt to get Chris Paul, the Lakers' chief motivation for trading Odom was to chop their payroll and to save money.

Under the new revenue sharing plan in the recently adopted collective bargaining agreement, the Lakers will pay a bundle and because of that, owner Jerry Buss is no longer willing to spend so freely in going above the luxury tax, according to sources."

(UPDATE- 7:00 pm PT: 710 ESPN's John Ireland, who also serves as the team's radio voice, reports that a source inside the organization says the proposed deal was for both of L.A.'s first round picks, not just the one. Obviously that would change the equation substantially, making the trade far less appealing. However, he also indicates the financial concerns regarding this and other trades are real, and that the Lakers are hesitant to bring in salary without sending some out the door, which fits well with the concerns illustrated below.)

(Read full post)

Chat transcript!

February, 22, 2012
2/22/12
8:21
AM PT
By the Kamenetzky Brothers
ESPNLosAngeles.com
Archive
Never a dull moment in Laker Land. By definition, that makes for a lively Laker chat.

Among the talking points were Pau Gasol's future in L.A., how Michael Beasley (reportedly on the front office radar) would fit in L.A., and the likelihood of new faces after the trade deadline. Plus, a shout out to "Chaz!"

Click here for the transcript.

Mitch Kupchack issues statement

February, 20, 2012
2/20/12
9:46
PM PT
Kamenetzky By Brian Kamenetzky
ESPNLosAngeles.com
Archive
After Kobe Bryant delivered his strong comments following Sunday's loss in Phoenix regarding the limboriffic status of Pau Gasol -- either trade him or make it clear he's staying, but pick one already -- I figured they wouldn't change much in terms of how the front office approached a potential trade. Whatever timeline Mitch Kupchak and Jim Buss have for whatever moves are coming won't be altered. Before Monday's game, Kupchak issued the the following statement:
“As a former player, I understand how the days leading up to the trade deadline can be nerve-wracking for an NBA player. Nonetheless, as General Manager of the Lakers, I have a responsibility to ownership, our fans and the players on this team to actively pursue opportunities to improve the team for this season and seasons to come. To say publicly that we would not do this would serve no purpose and put us at a competitive disadvantage. Taking such a course of action at this time would be a disservice to ownership, the team and our many fans."

Loosely translated, "We're going to do what we're going to do when we do it, and we're not going to talk about it."

Which is what you'd expect. As Kupchak says, the Lakers gain nothing by committing one way or the other, or, frankly by discussing it. Secrets are very tough to keep in this industry. So going forward, little changes. When the Lakers and Gasol play well, the significance of Sunday's events will be diminished (with some causation/correlation confusion added in, I'm sure) and they'll be praised for properly compartmentalizing. When they/he don't, the trade talk will be called a distraction. Reality, as it generally is, will be somewhere in between.

Everyone wants clarity and resolution, but odds are it won't come before the deadline, if it comes at all. There's no guarantee we'll have an idea of the team's direction before the summer, for that matter.

Pau Gasol and the Trade Machine

February, 20, 2012
2/20/12
2:23
PM PT
Kamenetzky By Brian Kamenetzky
ESPNLosAngeles.com
Archive
Last week, in the wake of that day's rumor-du-jour (to Minnesota for Derrick Williams and stuff) Pau Gasol told me he'd like some sort of resolution to the ongoing swap gossip swirling around him. Following L.A.'s loss to the Suns on Sunday in Phoenix, Kobe Bryant laid into management, saying essentially the same thing. Trade him or don't, but make a decision quickly. Don't let Gasol, or the team, twist in the wind.

I suspect Kobe's comments won't do much beyond making Gasol's mental state an even bigger focus between now and the deadline.


Andrew D. Bernstein/NBAE/Getty Images
Would you want to see these guys switch jerseys?

Pau is a tough guy to trade. On the one hand, even in a "down" year, Gasol is averaging 16.8 points, 10.7 rebounds, 3.1 assists and 1.3 blocks a game. Last night, he put up 17/12/6, and after people were concerned about circumstances sending his game downhill. He's very, very good, and has a skill set most teams covet. Far too good to give away for a box of saltines and 15 basketballs.

On the other hand, he's 31, carries a pricey contract and still has a little image rehab to do following the end of last season.

Still, if everyone wants a resolution and the Lakers, as Gasol believes, are simply waiting for the right offer, what could the deals look like? Below are a collection of Trade Machine-approved swaps, many reflecting some of the very rumors causing all this controversy in the first place.

(A couple of notes: First, for simplicity's sake, I stuck to two-team deals with at least some degree of viability. Second, I tried to keep each deal boiled down to the key figures. Again, a nod to simplicity, and the clarity of a deal's essential components. Experiment with them as you please to appease the gods of equity. Finally, inclusion of a scenario is not necessarily an endorsement.)

TRADE 1: Lakers trade Gasol to Houston for Luis Scola, Kevin Martin and Goran Dragic.

It's the deal everyone made before, right, cutting those pesky league-owned killjoy Hornets out of the loop? No, not really. That swap worked well for L.A. because they got back Chris Paul in the process. Houston's package nets them a lesser replacement at power forward whose numbers this year are down, an explosive scorer in Martin who plays the same position as Kobe and a score-first prospect at the point who represents an improvement over what the Lakers have, because almost anyone does.

Maybe the Lakers can flip the components for something else, but unless you think the Lakers win by adding more depth -- I'm a believer that, generally speaking, in the NBA the team getting the best player wins the deal -- I don't think this improves them.

Adding Kyle Lowry changes the equation, but Houston isn't doing that.

TRADE 2: Gasol to Chicago for Carlos Boozer and C.J. Watson

It would be interesting, because as worked up as the fan base can get over Gasol's perceived inadequacies few players have been more roundly mocked locally than Boozer, going back to his Utah days. Just about every criticism has been thrown his way, fairly or not. Offensively, the fit isn't bad. Boozer is skilled, and unlike Gasol doesn't pine for high-quality touches on the block, so he'd open things up for Andrew Bynum down low. On the other hand, except for rebounding, Boozer is an awful defender, and his short arms (for a 6-foot-9 guy) and earthbound game mean he alters very little inside (0.5 blocks per game). The Lakers would suffer defensively in the exchange. Plus, Boozer gets hurt all the time. Only three of his past seven seasons could be reasonably considered healthy, and he's owed a lot of money going forward.

The key would be Watson. Is he a starting-caliber PG who simply hasn't had the opportunity, or just a solid backup? I tend to believe the latter. For this trade to work, the Bulls would have to add sweetener. A package centered around Luol Deng might have appeal for the Lakers, but the metrics don't work as well for Chicago.

(Read full post)

Kobe Bryant to management: Make a decision on Pau Gasol

February, 19, 2012
2/19/12
11:48
PM PT
Kamenetzky By Brian Kamenetzky
ESPNLosAngeles.com
Archive


If the Lakers thought the 48 minutes encompassing their loss Sunday night to Phoenix was unpleasant, they can find solace in the fact that come Monday, it won't be what people are talking about.


Chris Chambers/Getty Images
Sunday night in Phoenix, Kobe Bryant made it clear he wants to see a resolution to the ongoing Pau Gasol rumors.

Following the game, Kobe Bryant managed to change the subject in a big way, firing shots across the bow of management regarding the future of Pau Gasol. Among the highlights, via ESPNLA.com's Dave McMenamin:
"Basketball is such an emotional game, you got to be able to have all of yourself in the game and invested in the game. We didn't have that," Bryant said after Gasol had 17 points and 12 rebounds against the Suns. "Pau, it's hard for Pau because of all this trade talk and all this other stuff, it's hard for him to kind of invest himself completely or immerse himself completely into games when he's hearing trade talk every other day. I wish management would come out and either trade him or not trade him."

And...
"It's just tough for a player to give his all when you don't know if you're going to be here tomorrow. I'd rather them not trade him at all. If they're going to do something, I wish they would just (expletive) do it. If they're not going to do it, come out and say you're not going to do it. This way he can be comfortable, he can go out, he can play and he can invest all of himself into the game."

And...
"I'm sure we'll make some tweaks here and there, but the foundation obviously starts with myself and Pau and the emergence of Andrew (Bynum). But you can't have one of our pillars not knowing if he's going to be here or not. Do something. One way or another, do something... He's been the consummate professional. He's going out, he's trying to do what he can, but let's be real. If you didn't know you were going to be here tomorrow, if your head's on the chopping block, you feel like you're just waiting. It's tough to put all of yourself into the game."

Bryant's words echo some of the things Pau told me last week, he believes the Lakers still plan to trade him and would like a resolution one way or the other. In absolute terms, Bryant is also absolutely right. It doesn't help to have such an important player on the team distracted by off-court issues. The context of trade talks surrounding Gasol is unique, because he already has evidence the Lakers will move him following the failed trade for Chris Paul. It's not theoretical, making the rumors a lot harder to ignore. Gasol's situation is also different than, say, Andrew Bynum's, because while Drew has blown in the breeze of trade winds for years and has never expressed a burning desire to leave, he's also made it pretty clear it wouldn't crush him, either.

Gasol absolutely, unequivocally wants to stay.

(Read full post)

Pau Gasol still unsure of his future in Los Angeles

February, 16, 2012
2/16/12
10:01
PM PT
Kamenetzky By Brian Kamenetzky
ESPNLosAngeles.com
Archive
It's been a couple months since the failed mega deal that would have sent Pau Gasol to Houston, bringing Chris Paul to L.A. (wearing purple and gold, specifically) in return. But just because David Stern put the kibosh on that deal doesn't mean the end of Gasol-related rumors.

The newest point of chatter, via Chris Tomasson of FoxSports.com, again fires up the Pau-to-The Great White North conversation.

While he's worked proactively to set the rumors aside, Gasol told me today he still senses the Lakers are are ready to move him once a good enough deal comes along. "There's talks and rumors every day. Today I was reading it was Minnesota is really interested in trying to put a good package together," he said. "[Other teams are] calling, and it seems like things are just waiting for the right offer to come along for [the Lakers] to pull the trigger."

As he's done every time he's been asked since the failed CP3 deal, Gasol reiterated a desire to stay in L.A., but acknowledges "It's out of my hands... I'd like to make his team better and get back to a championship level, but it's not up to me." As it was in the immediate aftermath of the December non-deal when it appeared the Paul trade might be revived, Gasol said he just wished he knew one way or the other.

"It would give me some peace, or more peace," he said.

"Every day I tell myself, try to let it go. Don't think about it. Have fun, be the player you are out there. That's all that you can do."

At least as it relates to his on court performance, Gasol is effectively setting aside the off court stuff. While his shooting percentage is down (46.8 percent), over seven February games Gasol has produced 18.6 points, 14 rebounds, 3.0 assists, and 1.7 blocks a night. As for the rumor itself, the latest sends Pau to Minnesota in exchange for anything not named Kevin Love or Ricky Rubio. Almost certainly any package would be centered around Derrick Williams, the second pick in the 2011 NBA Draft, plus whatever else Mitch Kupchak and Jim Buss might want off David Kahn's roster, which while improving still has an Island of Misfit Toys feel after Love and Rubio.

Even if the Lakers managed to acquire a point guard in the process (Luke Ridnour?), there's no way this sort of deal actually improves them. It only makes sense (and avoids a totally apoplectic Kobe Bryant) if the Lakers believed strongly they could use Williams as a chip in another trade, or as part of a three-team swap. Certainly he'd have some appeal as a young, potential cornerstone. Enough to help swing trades for Dwight Howard or Deron Williams? Who knows.

On the "Sure, that could happen!" scale, this one rates pretty low. I suspect its roots are somewhere in Minnesota, rather than El Segundo.

Chat transcript!

February, 15, 2012
2/15/12
9:00
AM PT
Kamenetzky By Brian Kamenetzky
ESPNLosAngeles.com
Archive
The room has closed for business, but you can still check out the conversation. Among the talking points: Gilbert Arenas vs. J.R. Smith... Mike Brown vs. Metta World Peace... and the trade deadline vs. the limited resources at Mitch Kupchak's disposal.

Plus, a reader suspects the Kamenetzky wives don't realize how fortunate they are being married to Lakers bloggers. Clearly, luckier stars have never been discovered.

Everything can be found by clicking the link here.

Chat transcript!

February, 8, 2012
2/08/12
8:34
AM PT
By the Kamenetzky Brothers
ESPNLosAngeles.com
Archive
It was a lively day in the chat-o-sphere, as one would expect with an erratic road trip halfway in the books.

Among the talking points were potential trade targets (Rondo, Sessions, Howard, etc.), the role of Andrew Goudelock upon Steve Blake's return and Mike Brown's rotations. Plus, fare thee well, Derrick Caracter.

For those who couldn't attend, here's a link to the transcript.

Wednesday chat transcript

January, 25, 2012
1/25/12
11:38
AM PT
By the Kamenetzky Brothers
ESPNLosAngeles.com
Archive
The Lakers have a big game tonight against the Clippers, but much of the talk still centered around roster moves, from Dwight Howard on down to smaller moves. Are the Lakers doing anything to fix current problems? We talk that, and more.

Here's the link to the transcript.

SPONSORED HEADLINES

TEAM LEADERS

POINTS
Nick Young
PTS AST STL MIN
17.9 1.5 0.7 28.3
OTHER LEADERS
ReboundsJ. Hill 7.4
AssistsK. Bryant 6.3
StealsK. Bryant 1.2
BlocksW. Johnson 1.0