5-on-5: How will Silver change things up?

February, 6, 2014
Feb 6
5:07
PM ET
This is an excerpt from today's edition of 5-on-5:

What should Adam Silver do differently than David Stern?


There's naturally going to be huge differences because there's only one Stern. Silver couldn't copy his mentor's management style even if he wanted to; David J. Stern was an American original. But the question I'm really asking myself when I see what you're posing here is: How does Silver quickly establish himself as he replaces a guy who was in power for so long and had such a noisy hammer? I see it as one of Silver's biggest early challenges ... and I'm certainly not going to pretend here like I've got it all figured out for him. Folks around the league are talking about how Silver will be much more collaborative than Stern was and how the owners plan to take some of the power back that they've lost over the years. Not sure that all sounds so promising. The commissioner, to me, has to be the commissioner.

What problem does Silver need to fix?


The perception that the NBA is completely naked when it comes to PED testing is unacceptable. I likewise fully encourage Mark Cuban to keep pushing for all of the human growth hormone research he wants to commission so we get a lot smarter about HGH and testosterone in particular, but the holes in the NBA's current drug policy are gaping. If you find yourself thinking that someone out there in this league is breaking the rules and getting away with it, you're only human. It's not completely the NBA's fault, because the chaos in the players' association since the lockout ended in December 2011 complicates the implementation of a new policy. But there's a nagging sense out there that the NBA has simply been waiting for the NFL to set its new policy and follow suit.

Read the full 5-on-5 roundtable here »

Marc Stein | email

Senior Writer, ESPN.com
• Senior NBA writer for ESPN.com
• Began covering the NBA in 1993-94
• Also covered soccer, tennis and the Olympics

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