Can Dolphins fix their offensive line?

October, 7, 2013
10/07/13
10:00
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Here is a number that you’re going to hear a lot in Miami over the next two weeks: 24. That’s the amount of quarterback sacks the Dolphins have allowed in the first five games.

Watching the Dolphins pass protect every week often provides a helpless feeling. Each week Miami says it will do better, and each week the problems persist. After allowing four sacks to the New Orleans Saints, the Dolphins allowed a season-high six sacks in Sunday’s 26-23 loss to the Baltimore Ravens.

Dolphins quarterback Ryan Tannehill has been sacked 24 times, the most of any quarterback in the NFL. Frustration is building with the offensive line through their struggles.

“Pride is always there,” Dolphins left tackle Jonathan Martin said after the game. “You never want to give up a sack, and [24] is a high number. I don’t like hearing that. It’s definitely something that we need to turnaround now.”

But can they? That’s a major question facing the Dolphins.

Miami has allowed at least four sacks in every game this season. Whether it’s Cleveland, Indianapolis, Atlanta, New Orleans or Baltimore, everyone is getting to Tannehill with frequency. Pressure is coming up the middle and on the edges. Center Mike Pouncey is the only Dolphins lineman who has played consistently well this year.

It’s amazing that Tannehill is still having a good second season. Tannehill threw for 307 yards and a touchdown against Baltimore despite immense pressure and virtually no help from his running game. Most importantly, Tannehill hasn’t looked rattled and is proving his toughness.

This will be the only time the Dolphins have two weeks to fix their issues. Pass protection should be at the very top of their list of worries.

“I think coming up on a bye week is a chance for us to come up for some air,” Dolphins guard Richie Incognito said. “Evaluate what’s working and what’s not working, and just come back and hit the ground running.”

James Walker | email

ESPN Miami Dolphins reporter

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