Revisiting Dolphins' Brandon Marshall trade

May, 20, 2014
May 20
4:00
PM ET
The Chicago Bears made a significant financial commitment to five-time Pro Bowl wide receiver Brandon Marshall. On Monday the Bears agreed to a three-year, $30 million contract with Marshall, who recorded 100 receptions for 1,295 yards and 12 touchdowns in 2013.

But before Marshall posted back-to-back seasons of at least 100 receptions in Chicago, he was the No. 1 receiver for the Miami Dolphins. Marshall posted two 1,000-yard seasons in Miami from 2010-2011.

Marshall was by far the Dolphins' best receiver. But a new coaching staff led by Joe Philbin was taking over in 2012, and the new regime was concerned with Marshall's strong personality while trying to implement a new program. The Dolphins traded Marshall after two seasons for a pair of Chicago's third-round picks in 2012 and 2013.

Here are the details of the trade between Miami and Chicago:
  • Miami traded Marshall to the Bears in 2012.
  • Chicago shipped third-round picks in 2012 and 2013 to Miami.
  • Miami drafted cornerback Will Davis in 2013.
  • Miami traded Chicago's third-round pick in 2012 with the San Diego Chargers for their third- and sixth-round picks.
  • The Dolphins drafted tight end Michael Egnew (third round) and receiver B.J. Cunningham (sixth round).

In the end the Dolphins swapped Marshall for young, inexperienced players: Davis, Egnew and Cunningham. Davis received little playing time last year as a rookie. Egnew is a third-round bust after two seasons and may not make the roster in 2014. Cunningham is no longer with the Dolphins.

It's easy to see the Bears got the better of this trade with Miami. The risk in trading a Pro Bowl player for draft picks is the general manager -- in this case former Dolphins general manager Jeff Ireland -- must be able to nail the picks. Ireland was unable to capitalize and it hurt the Dolphins.

James Walker | email

ESPN Miami Dolphins reporter

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