DANVILLE, Calif. -- As he stood outside a movie theater in an affluent East Bay Area suburb on Sunday, Landrin Kelly fought back tears.

He's used to it now. Ten years have not completely quelled the pain he was left with following the murder of his son, Terrance, just days before he was set to begin a promising college football career at Oregon. No amount of time will.

A couple hundred others also gathered at the theater to see an early screening of "When The Game Stands Tall," a movie that chronicles the story of Terrance's death and the ensuing impact it had on the famed football program at Concord's De La Salle High. Based on the book by author Neil Hayes, the movie is set to hit theaters nationwide on Friday.

[+] EnlargeKelly
Courtesy of the Terrance Kelly Youth FoundationTerrence Kelly was killed in August of 2004, just days before leaving for the University of Oregon.
For Landrin, the emotions were bittersweet.

"I've been to a lot of events [that remember Terrance]," he said. "The exciting part is that the story is being told of my son."

Violence is a harsh reality in the crime-riddled city of Richmond, just north of Oakland, where the Kelly family called home. It was a main factor in the decision to send Terrance to De La Salle, a private Catholic school 25 miles to the east. Known nationally as a football power, De La Salle provided a safe haven for Kelly and the opportunity to play for legendary coach Bob Ladouceur.

"We wanted to get him out of Richmond," Landrin said.

During his four years at De La Salle, Kelly blossomed into a good student, a team leader and one of the best football prospects in the country. A running back and linebacker for the Spartans, Scout.com ranked Kelly as the No. 16 safety in the country -- one spot ahead of current Washington Redskins and two-time Pro Bowler Dashon Goldson.

Ask those around the De La Salle community how good Kelly was, and they'll tell you -- like his high school teammates Maurice Jones-Drew and T.J. Ward -- there was little doubt he was destined for a career in the NFL.

Oregon was the first school to offer Kelly a scholarship, but the entire Pac-10 followed suit. He ultimately committed to the Ducks -- over UCLA and Cal -- based largely on the relationship he developed with defensive coordinator Nick Aliotti, whose brother, Joe, was on Ladouceur's staff.

In his personal statement, as part of his admissions application at Oregon, Kelly reflected on what life was like growing up in Richmond and his plans for the future:
Many people imagine the life of a teenager as being carefree and simple, but that in not the case in the city I live in. While growing up in Richmond, California there has been a lot of distractions. For example, the murder rate of young African Americans in the city is very high, drugs are rampant in the community, not very many of the youth in the community understand the importance of an education, much less if they live or die. Many youth place more importance on being in a gang than an education. A large number of the youth don't even graduate from high school. They either dropout, go to jail, or unfortunately get murdered. Something as simple as sitting down doing your homework can be a challenge. While trying to study I have often had to contend with hearing gunshots, ambulance or police cars racing up and down the streets. The library is just a shelter for the homeless and a baby-sitter for young children waiting until their parents get off work.

Through all of this I have established high expectations and standards for myself. I am determined not to end up like many of my peers. I have a strong sense of purpose and direction for my life. I am motivated to strive to be the best person I can be, with the understanding that a solid education can lead to self-improvement as well as, social and economic empowerment.

De La Salle teammates Cameron Colvin, Jackie Bates and Willie Glasper also signed with Oregon, in no small part because of Kelly. Ward eventually walked on the following year.

[+] EnlargeTerrance Kelly
Jeff Chiu/AP PhotoBrother Christopher Brady, principal at De La Salle High School, adjusts a makeshift memorial for Terrance Kelly in this 2004 photo.
"T.K. was the guy that held them all together," said Ladouceur, who is portrayed brilliantly in the movie by Jim Caviezel. "When that happened to him, it took a real motivation out of their lives. They were like the four musketeers and for them to all of a sudden have to go up there minus one, was really, really hard."

The impact Kelly's death had at Oregon was nearly as substantial as it was at home.

"[Aliotti] didn't believe it when I called him and told him somebody killed my baby," Landrin Kelly said. "He didn't believe it. I had to say, 'No, for real Nick.' I was crying. I had to give the phone to my wife because I was so heart broken."

After Terrance's passing, the bond between his family and the Oregon program continued to strengthen. At his funeral in Richmond, part of which is depicted during an emotional scene in the film, Aliotti delivered the eulogy and he went on to keep a picture of Terrance on his desk until his recent retirement.

In 2007, in what would have been Kelly's senior year, Oregon invited Landrin, and his grandson, on to the field to take part in the Senior Day ceremony. He proudly showed off a No. 32 jersey that day and continues to make at least one trip to Eugene a year to watch the Ducks.

In memory of his son, Landrin, along with the help of several others, operates the Terrance Kelly Youth Foundation. The foundation exists to provide community outreach for children between the ages of 5 and 17, and aims to inspire kids to become responsible and productive adults in the community. The non-profit organization provides several programs and scholarships for youth in Richmond.

Darren Pratcher was 15-years-old when he shot Kelly four times as sat in his car outside a house in Richmond, waiting to pick up his stepbrother to give him a ride home. The killing came in retaliation for a perceived slight during a pick-up basketball game, which is also depicted in the film.

Pratcher was prosecuted as an adult, and after five days of deliberations in October 2006, a jury convicted him of first-degree murder and weapon enhancements. He was later sentenced to 50 years to life in prison.
Some national reaction to the news of Braxton Miller's season-ending shoulder injury is focusing not only on the harsh consequences for Ohio State but also on the impact for the Big Ten as a whole. Mark Schlabach basically says the league's quest for a spot in the College Football Playoff took a huge hit.

To that, I say let's all slow down for just a bit. Some key counterpoints to consider:

[+] EnlargeJosiah Price
AP Photo/Al GoldisTo say the loss of Braxton Miller dooms the Big Ten's College Football Playoff chase is demeaning to the defending Rose Bowl champs.
1. It's Aug. 19. To pretend any of us has any idea what will happen in an upcoming college football season is to ignore history. How many pundits picked Auburn to make the BCS title game last year? I'm guessing most people would have sold their stock on Michigan State's season after the Spartans' lost at Notre Dame on Sept. 21. They turned out all right.

2. Ohio State isn't suddenly going to turn into a 6-6 pumpkin. There is still a ton of talent on this team. I watched an entire practice this spring in which Miller did not participate. I was still blown away by the speed and athleticism on the roster. Are the Buckeyes a top 10 team now? Maybe not. But they will still be, at the very least, a top 20 club. They're probably not a playoff team, but beating Ohio State won't be a meaningless win for other Big Ten teams, either.

3. There is more than one team in the Big Ten. Sure, the Buckeyes have been the league's flag-bearer for most of this century and have more national credibility than any other conference program. But don't forget the Buckeyes haven't won an outright Big Ten championship since 2009. There is no guarantee they would have claimed one this year, either, as Michigan State, Wisconsin, Iowa and Nebraska are all legit title contenders.

4. Let's go back to Michigan State here. The Spartans proved themselves as elite the past year, as they finished No. 3 in the final polls and beat Stanford in the Rose Bowl. Mark Dantonio's team goes to Oregon in Week 2 in a game that could define their season. If the Spartans win there, assuming Oregon goes on to have a very strong season, they will be formidable playoff contenders no matter what else is going on in the Big Ten. Even if, say, they lost to the Ducks by a field goal, going undefeated the rest of the way should be enough to get Michigan State into the field of four.

5. Let's say another team from the West -- such as Iowa or Wisconsin, should the Badgers beat LSU in the opener -- runs the table. Don't you think a Big Ten championship game featuring the Spartans and an undefeated West team would get the attention of the selection committee? Iowa and Nebraska probably need a zero in the loss column, while Michigan State and Wisconsin could afford a setback, given their marquee nonconference opposition. And, hey, who's to say Ohio State doesn't go 12-0 again, even without Miller? Urban Meyer has yet to lose a regular season game in Columbus, after all.

The bottom line is there are far too many variables -- including what goes on in the other Power 5 conferences -- to count the Big Ten out at this early date. The path to Pasadena (or, less likely, New Orleans) certainly got a lot bumpier with the loss of the league's best player. But the road hasn't been closed yet.

O-H-N-O!

Tuesday's news that Ohio State quarterback Braxton Miller will miss the upcoming season with an injury to his right (throwing) shoulder seriously deflates the Buckeyes' hopes of making the inaugural four-team College Football Playoff. Their national championship aspirations seem all but over -- 11 days before they'll open the season against Navy in Baltimore on Aug. 30.

Miller's injury also puts a serious dent in the Big Ten's chances of having a representative in the playoff. Miller, the two-time reigning Big Ten Player of the Year, was a preseason Heisman Trophy favorite and one of the country's top returning quarterbacks.

Without Miller, the Buckeyes will have a difficult time matching their success in coach Urban Meyer's first two seasons, when they won 24 games in a row before losing to Michigan State 34-24 in the 2013 Big Ten championship game and 40-35 to Clemson in the Discover Orange Bowl.

Miller, who threw for 2,094 yards with 24 touchdowns and ran for 1,068 yards with 12 more scores, was a tailor-made fit for Meyer's spread offense. Without him, the Buckeyes will probably turn to freshman J.T. Barrett, who has never played in a college game. In fact, Barrett played in only five games as a senior at Rider High School in Wichita Falls, Texas, in 2012 before injuring his knee. He redshirted at OSU last season while recovering from knee surgery.

How valuable was Miller to OSU? When news of his season-ending diagnosis broke on Tuesday, oddsmakers at the Las Vegas Hilton Sportsbook dropped the Buckeyes' odds of winning a national championship from 12-to-1 to 50-to-1. Ouch. There's a reason Las Vegas has so many glitzy buildings; the oddsmakers usually know what they're talking about.

Read the rest of Mark Schlabach's column here.

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Wait a minute, Michigan State Spartans fans.

Hang on a second, Virginia Tech Hokies.

Braxton Miller's season-ending injury wasn't good for anyone. Not the Ohio State Buckeyes. Not the Big Ten. And not the inaugural College Football Playoff -- or any of Ohio State's opponents trying to get there.

Put simply: Beating a ranked Ohio State team led by a Heisman contending, veteran quarterback would carry more weight in the eyes of the 13-member playoff committee than a win against a 9-3 team led by a rookie quarterback who hasn't played in two years. (This is all assuming, of course, that J.T. Barrett will play like the redshirt rookie he is.) If Ohio State is now weaker -- a logical assumption following the injury to one of the nation's best quarterbacks -- then its opponents' strength of schedule just got weaker, too.

And so did the Big Ten.

In spite of Michigan State's ascension (not to mention its 2013 win against the Buckeyes), the Big Ten has still been measured by Ohio State in the court of public opinion. The Buckeyes had two things going for them this season: Miller and arguably the best defensive line in the country. Even with having to replace four starters on the offensive line, there was enough confidence in Urban Meyer's recruiting to consider the Buckeyes a true contender for the playoff. Now, Michigan State clearly has more answers and should be the clear-cut favorite to win the East Division, but would a win against Oregon in Week 2 be enough to propel the Spartans into the playoff?

Not if the selection committee shares the public's perception of the Big Ten, which has lost 25 of its past 33 games against ranked, power conference competition and Notre Dame. The Big Ten hasn't played for a national title since Ohio State's last appearance in 2007. As a Power Five conference, the Big Ten has been playing catch-up to the SEC (like everyone else), the Pac-12 and even the ACC, which finally raised its profile with Florida State's national title.

Virginia Tech's schedule, though, looks like a cotton ball with the exception of their visit to Ohio State in Week 2. With North Carolina the only other ranked opponent on the schedule, and seven home games, the Hokies could be one of the country's most deceiving teams come November. A road win against a full-strength Ohio State team would have shocked the country and propelled the Hokies into the playoff conversation.

Now? Strength of schedule will be called into question, but Virginia Tech isn't alone.

Should Michigan State win the East and play in the Big Ten title game, it's debatable whether a win against the West Division winner would do much to further impress the committee. The East is the stronger and more compelling race, as three teams in the West had losing records last season (Northwestern, Purdue and Illinois), and Nebraska was the only team to win its bowl game.

Fair or not, Ohio State was entering this season carrying the banner for the entire conference once again. The Buckeyes certainly aren't doomed -- there are plenty of rookie quarterback success stories for a blueprint, and Barrett could easily join them. The big picture, though, has certainly changed. After what was easily the most impactful playoff news of the summer, the Buckeyes aren't the only ones who have lost.
videoUnlike a wide-eyed freshman, nothing is exactly new for Tennessee defensive end Curt Maggitt, but he does enter the 2014 season hoping for a fresh start after injuries ravaged the better part of his first three years on campus.

There was the lingering high school shoulder injury his freshman year, and his sophomore season brought turf toe, an everlasting shoulder stinger and an eventual season-ending ACL injury.

After multiple surgeries, and some frustratingly long recovery time, Maggitt sat out all of the 2013 season.

An ankle injury is currently nagging Maggitt during fall camp, but all indications are that his coaches have held him back for precautionary measures, making sure he’s ready for the season, because Tennessee needs a healthy Maggitt in 2014.

“We missed Curt a lot [last season] because we know what he can bring to the table,” said linebacker A.J. Johnson, who is Maggitt’s roommate. “He’s like a brother to me and we missed him a lot. We know how much he’s going to help us and how much work he’s put in to get back to be ready for this season.”

What the Vols missed was an elite pass-rusher and finisher. Last season, Tennessee was last in the SEC with 18 sacks and 12th in the league with 65 tackles for loss.

Getting Maggitt back – and fully healthy – would be a major upgrade for a team completely rebuilding its defensive line. Maggitt will line up all over at linebacker this fall, but will spend most of his time with his hand in the ground at defensive end, a position Maggitt said he prefers to outside linebacker.

Maggitt has endured a career-long struggle with his body at Tennessee. The once-prized recruit from West Palm Beach, Florida, arrived in Knoxville and promptly recorded 56 tackles and 5.5 tackles for loss, despite a surgically repaired shoulder that needed surgery again after the season.

In 2012, Maggitt suffered a nasty case of turf toe in the season opener when his foot got caught in the turf of the Georgia Dome while he blocked NC State quarterback Mike Glennon during an interception return by teammate Prentiss Waggner.

Trainers made him a thick, plastic cast for his toe, which forced him to wear a size 14 shoe on his right foot and a normal size 13 on his left.

“You really realize how important that big toe is,” Maggitt said. “Every time I would try to plant or push off of it, it would hurt.”

The cast helped, but it created an awkward, wobbly running style. Maggitt couldn’t stop properly on his right foot, which he thinks resulted in his subsequent ACL injury against Missouri on Nov. 10, while landing awkwardly on his right foot after hurdling Mizzou quarterback James Franklin.

Maggitt missed spring and part of summer before he, his father, Roosevelt, and coach Butch Jones decided to officially shut his season down after the Oregon game.

The heart of Tennessee’s defense was forced to helplessly sit and watch, as the Vols suffered through Jones’ inaugural 5-7 season.

“When he’s been playing ball since he was 9 years old, it’s really tough because he has it in his bloodstream to be out there,” Maggitt’s father said. “No matter the intensity level of the game, whether it’s in the backyard, he loves playing. It was tough for him.”

Maggitt said he got down on himself a lot and needed extra comfort from his teammates at times. His injuries kept him away from football and normal workouts. He went from having a max bench press of 330 pounds to not being able to lift the bar.

While he still assumed the role of the team’s top leader, Maggitt felt the pain of separation during road games, when Maggitt couldn’t travel.

“It was weird because since Day 1 when I was a freshman, I was never left behind,” Maggitt said. “It was kind of a salty feeling, feeling like you’re being left, put up for adoption almost.”

However, Maggitt found his release by taking advantage of his time away from the field. He recorded his highest GPA of 3.5 for a semester and began to plan for a future without football.

Very personable, Maggitt’s interest in becoming a sales rep for a business drew him to an internship with Omega Technical Services in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. There, Maggitt shadowed a business developer and did everyday work, like writing and sending emails, organizing meetings and sitting in on meetings with potential clients.

The day-to-day work helping to organize and develop a business really interested Maggitt, but that’s for the future. For now, his focus is on getting back on the field and making an impact for his team.

Maggitt is excited about having a more versatile role within Tennessee’s defense and already knows the first time he steps on the field he’ll have his eyes pierced on the quarterback lining up opposite him, waiting to make first contact.

“I’m excited about that,” he said. “It’s been a long time, especially in Neyland [Stadium]. “If I get a sack in Neyland, man, I might just end up laying on the ground for a little bit and soak that moment up.”
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -- Walking off the Doak Campbell Stadium field, Mario Edwards Jr. held his helmet in his left hand. The relentless Florida sun reflected off the helmet’s base, which was only now visible through the scratches and scrapes that rubbed the gold paint off.

This wasn’t after a Clemson, Florida or Miami game. Florida State just finished up its first preseason intrasquad scrimmage.

The only players whose helmets might look similar? “Maybe the offensive linemen,” Edwards said, because those are the unfortunate ones the physically imposing junior defensive end bludgeons on a daily basis.

[+] EnlargeMario Edwards
Kim Klement/USA TODAY SportsSack totals don't explain the impact of Mario Edwards Jr. for the Seminoles.
Edwards’ job along the defensive line is often an unenviable one, as his helmet that will require a retouching every week indicates. It’s also a position where Edwards doesn’t get the same recognition as his Florida State predecessors, such as Cornellius Carradine, Brandon Jenkins or Bjoern Werner, who each had the liberty of focusing on rushing the passer from the edge more than Edwards, who is shifted all over the defensive line.

Last week, Florida State coach Jimbo Fisher was asked about Edwards and whether he should be in line for more than the 3.5 sacks he tallied as a sophomore in 2013. Once the reporter mentioned the word “sacks,” it set Fisher off and he challenged the logic of the query.

“Sacks don’t equate to greatness. You better watch that film. That guy’s a heck of a football player. You watch when the draft comes around,” said Fisher, pointing to Edwards' role on the country's top-scoring defense. “He’s as athletic and dominant as any defensive tackle we’ve ever had.”

The question set in motion a 10-minute coach's clinic session from Fisher, who broke down all of the responsibilities Edwards has, and there were many.

Edwards said he probably missed a few sacks last season because he didn’t understand the entire playbook, and it is easy to see why. As a first-year starter, Edwards was shifted from end to tackle and asked to line up in gaps, heads up with a lineman or shaded to a shoulder. The difference could be a matter of a few inches, but it completely alters the landscape of a defensive scheme. First-year defensive coordinator Charles Kelly said this season Edwards might edge rush one play then drop into coverage on the next because he’s “very powerful but at the same time he’s athletic.”

Fisher likes to call upon the time he witnessed Edwards do a standing back flip … in full pads. If that’s not impressive enough, consider the 20-year-old stands 6-foot-3 and tips the scales at a Twinkie shy of 300 pounds. And while the weight was a concern early in his career, Edwards dedicated himself this offseason, reshaping his body and turning much of the weight into muscle to prepare for the increased attention he’ll see with Timmy Jernigan off to the NFL.

“Talking with Timmy and talking to other guys, I realized it’s back on me now. I’m an upperclassman and we have to carry the tradition,” Edwards said. “I took my workouts serious. I lifted, ran, tried to watch what I ate.”

That has opposing offensive coordinators on heightened alert, especially after observing Edwards chase down speedy Auburn quarterback Nick Marshall in the national championship game. While many offenses are switching to uptempo speeds predicated on spreading the defense out, the philosophy of running the football between the tackles remains largely unchanged. However, the scheme forces defenses to eliminate players from the box and substitute a lineman or linebacker for a smaller defensive back.

The rise of the spread formation has made linemen with Edwards’ athletic ability all the more vital.

“The front guys that are big and agile are so much more critical now than they’ve ever been because the game is spread so they’re getting isolated more,” Fisher said. “… He’s as strong and naturally powerful as anyone I’ve been around.”
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COLUMBUS, Ohio -- There was optimism at seemingly every turn.

Braxton Miller pronounced himself 100 percent healthy whenever he was asked over the past two months. Urban Meyer expressed some concern about the volume of his reps, but he never indicated anything was off the schedule the Ohio State coach and his staff had set out for the star quarterback. Even in the hours leading up to a practice that the Buckeyes considered critical in gauging Miller’s rehab, there were no indications from offensive coordinator Tom Herman that anything was wrong.

And although it might be tempting to suggest that Ohio State rushed Miller back and put him in danger of reinjuring his surgically repaired shoulder or to think maybe the Buckeyes knew all along he was more seriously hurt than they let on, there’s nothing to suggest that everybody involved wasn’t doing all he could to have him on track to start on Aug. 30 at Navy.

Fluke injuries happen, and there doesn’t seem to be anything the Buckeyes could have done to prevent the devastating one that struck Miller on Monday and ended his season.

“It’s just the muscle,” Miller had said after the first workout of the two-a-day session, hours before leaving the practice field under the supervision of trainers. “It’s just getting it back, that little muscle around the surgery that I wasn’t using after I had the sling and stuff. Now that I’m back using it on an everyday basis, it just gets sore.

“I was throwing full-go every other day in the summer, so right now it’s practice every day. I can’t throw every day and just blow it out, then it’s sore for the next three days. We’ve just got to take it slow.”

The Buckeyes tried to do that every step of the way after Miller went under the knife in February.

He was held out entirely of spring practice, but Herman adjusted by doubling down on mental reps by attaching a camera and microphone to Miller’s hat and having him call out protections, coverages and reads with where to deliver the football.

He was supposed to ease his way back into throwing a football during the offseason, but the progress was considered so encouraging that Miller breezed through a step that called for him to throw tennis balls in one day, impressing the training staff with his rapid recovery.

By the time Big Ten media days arrived in late July, nobody representing Ohio State, including Miller himself, thought he would miss any time.

But when training camp did arrive, despite all the optimism and repeated mentions of Miller's rehabilitation schedule, there were at least a couple of subtle signs that maybe everything wasn’t as rosy as the Buckeyes were indicating. They never made the exact details of the plan public, but Miller was limited to throwing every other day during the opening weeks of camp. He was always supposed to be limited to largely observing both scrimmages, but his absence still set off alarm bells as the start of the season crept closer without Miller showing he was as healthy on a daily basis as he had claimed to be.

The admission of soreness and Herman’s confirmation on Monday that there was a minor setback added fuel to the fire that everything wasn’t necessarily in full working order, but Ohio State still had no reason to question its approach to getting him back on the field.

“It’s hard for me to speculate,” Herman said after Monday morning's practice. “He is where he is right now not because the shoulder is injured but because the fatigue of multiple practices, practices day after day after day, 50, 60, 70 balls being thrown. The thing is going to get tired. The muscles aren’t ready for that, and we’ve got to continue to build him up.

“I think it’s too early to have that concern [of missing a game]. I think the trainers are optimistic, everything is on schedule. He had a little bit of a setback with some additional soreness that we weren’t expecting, but I’m not ready to say 'concerned' is the right word. Not yet.”

That final caveat was ominous, and Ohio State’s worst fears would soon be realized in the afternoon practice.

Maybe Miller was always going to miss some time and the Buckeyes weren’t prepared to admit it. Or, perhaps more likely, Miller, Meyer, Herman and an experienced training staff were all right when they evaluated his progress on the road back from February.

But either way, it doesn’t matter now. It’s safe to assume that Ohio State did everything it could to get Miller ready for this season, but now it’s over before it even began.
Miami Hurricanes quarterback Jake Heaps wants to assure everybody his arm is just fine.

It may not have seemed that way Monday night, when word started to spread that he missed the evening scrimmage to rest his sore right arm. Given how much importance coach Al Golden has placed on quarterback performance in the preseason scrimmages, doubts about Heaps started to grow all around the Twitter-sphere to the repeated tune of hmmmmmmm ....

Such is life in the middle of a quarterback competition. One bit of news gets magnified tenfold until another bit of news comes along to tamp it down. So here it is, completely tamped down from Heaps himself:

"Everything is fine," Heaps told ESPN.com Tuesday in a phone interview. "I'm feeling good about everything, and just excited to get to practice Wednesday."

Heaps says he was held out of the scrimmage for precautionary reasons. While he sat on the sideline, true freshman Brad Kaaya threw two touchdown passes to grab a few headlines. But the competition to start at Louisville on Sept. 1 remains open between the two.

"They haven't given us a timetable on a decision," Heaps said. "They've kept everything pretty close to the vest, which I think is good because it just allows us to focus on every day and not worry about where we stand in certain points in time. It's about going out there each and every day and trying to take advantage of one practice and one rep at a time. That's all I'm concerned about, just trying to string a bunch of good days together and see where it falls. We're approaching Louisville here quickly, so I would imagine something would come in the near future, but I'm not concerned about that. I'm just focused on each practice that comes up."

Heaps says he has made the most of his two months on campus, since arriving as a transfer student from Kansas. Though there are no guarantees, he remains hopeful he will win the starting job.

"Obviously I'd be extremely disappointed if I didn't, but it's a long season and anything can happen so you have to have that mentality," he said. "At the end of the day, I don't regret anything. I've gone out and done everything that I could and laid it all on the line. At the end of the day, I have to look in the mirror and know if I gave it my all and I know that I have. I feel good about that. I'm just excited to continue practicing and see how everything ends up unfolding. I'll definitely be excited if I'm the guy."
The focus has largely been on the new quarterback and returning defenders at Clemson so far, but what has Dabo Swinney most excited for 2014 might be the backfield.

A year ago, the plan was for the Tigers to employ a handful of runners in key roles, but after injuries ravaged the depth chart, Rod McDowell became the default option in nearly every situation, and while he did an admirable job, Clemson still ranked 73rd in yards per carry. Carries by running backs accounted for just 32 percent of Clemson’s offensive plays last season -- 10 percentage points less than division counterpart Florida State.

But as the Tigers get set for their opener against Georgia, the plan for a more dynamic running game appears set for 2014, and Swinney couldn’t be more pleased with the weapons at his disposal.

[+] EnlargeWayne Gallman
AP Photo/Anderson Independent-Mail, Mark CrammerRedshirt freshman RB Wayne Gallman is turning heads in Clemson's camp.
“I think we’ve got a really deep group and a bunch of guys that deserve to play,” Swinney said. “The competition and diversity we have there is going to help us be very strong at that position.”

Redshirt senior D.J. Howard (5-foot-11, 205) is the nominal starter at this point, but he has been injury prone in his career and could quickly be upstaged by younger runners with more upside. Still, Howard is perhaps Clemson’s best pass blocker, and his knowledge of the system means he’ll have a secure role if he stays healthy.

Down the depth chart, however, there are plenty of weapons. Zac Brooks (6-foot, 200) projects as the best receiver out of the backfield from the group, and he serves as a nice change-of-pace runner from Howard. C.J. Davidson (5-10, 200) suffered a knee injury last season that limited his production, but Swinney said he might be the “most explosive” of Clemson’s veteran runners.

“He’s just a powerful change-of-direction type of guy,” Swinney said.

But the real emerging star might be redshirt freshman Wayne Gallman.

As the injuries piled up last season, one of the toughest decisions the coaching staff had to make was whether to keep Gallman (6-1, 205) sidelined. In the end, Swinney erred on the side of caution, keeping the redshirt on Gallman in order to get him ready for 2014. Now, Clemson is ready to enjoy the rewards of that patience.

Coaches and teammates have raved about Gallman’s progress throughout this offseason, and Swinney said he can’t remember being around a running back who practices with as much energy.

“We’re having to slow him down because he just plays so fast and violent,” Swinney said. “Things just get hit when he’s out there.”

Swinney said Gallman is learning to corral that energy and doing a better job of playing within Clemson’s system, but the coaching staff is eager to unleash its secret weapon on the rest of the ACC this fall.

“He’s going to be an exciting player to watch,” Swinney said.

Swinney said coaches are still deciding the future of the Tigers’ two true freshmen -- Adam Choice and C.J. Fuller, both 5-9 and 215 pounds -- but he loves the physicality both bring, and there’s a chance at least one will see work this season.

Of course, the focus on the tailbacks also comes from the loss of last year’s quarterback, Tajh Boyd, who racked up 154 carries -- just 35 fewer than McDowell. With less mobile senior Cole Stoudt prepared to take over the offense, the conventional wisdom suggests the tailbacks will need to pick up the slack.

Swinney said that might not be the case, however.

“We’re going to run our quarterback,” Swinney said. “That’s the nature of what we do. We feel like it gives us an advantage when the quarterback is part of the run game, and that part won’t change. Cole is definitely undervalued as a runner, and I think he’s going to be way better than people think.”

True freshman QB Deshaun Watson will be a big part of the offensive blueprint, too. Swinney has already said that Watson will play -- though not start -- this season, and it would make sense to let the freshman get his feet wet as a runner and red-zone threat early in the year.

“He’s gifted when it comes to running the ball,” Swinney said, “so you’ll see that.”

Still, for all the talk of running with the quarterback, this will be a slightly different look for the Tigers this fall, and that could be a good thing. With so much shuffling of personnel elsewhere on the offense, a dynamic backfield could be just what Clemson needs to push through a grueling early season schedule.

Of course, before that plan comes into focus, Swinney said, his tailbacks need to prove they're ready to carry the load.

“Hopefully we’ve got a couple of these backs that kind of demand through their performance that we call [plays] a little bit different,” he said. “But that’s up to them to prove that.”
Bobby Bowden, Matthew McConaugheyMCT via Getty Images, AP PhotoBobby Bowden said some have pegged Matthew McConaughey to play him on the big screen.

On Monday morning, legendary Florida State coach Bobby Bowden allowed fans to "ask me anything" via a Reddit.com chat. Here is the best of what we learned about Bowden during his hour-long conversation.

On who would play him in a movie about his life: There were some people that came to see me about making a movie, but they didn't end up doing it. They talked about, dadgummit, about the guy that played Jack Lengyel in We Are Marshall. Yea, Matthew McConaughey!

On his most memorable season: My memorable season was 1977. It was my second year at Florida State. Now the year before we had our only losing season and before that we had an 0-11 season. In 1977 we played in our first bowl game in about 5 years, we were nationally rank for the first time in about 5 years, and we beat Texas Tech in the Citrus Bowl. It finally turned our program around.

On Jameis Winston being best ever FSU QB: Let me say this. He's got the best start no doubt about it. And he could definitely end up the best, but let's see how his career goes. A lot of things can happen. People forget Chris Weinke took us to the NCG 3 straight times. How many quarterbacks have ever done that?

On peanuts in soda: Well you know, I always did that. I'd get an orange drink and put peanuts in it, or any cold drink. I think Jimbo does that too. It's an old country habit. That's just like lunch to me, boy.

On best player he ever coached: I think the best athlete I ever coached was Deion Sanders. We had other players who were good in their own way. But, I don't think we ever had anyone with as much natural talent.

On what he orders at Taco Bell: Wooh. Gosh, seldom do I eat at Taco Bell, I'm not sure. I don't know. I guess I'd look to see what the most expensive thing was and go ahead and buy it. Hoping that they know what they're talking about.

Steve Spurrier
AP Photo/Dave MartinBobby Bowden said he was a big fan of his rivalry with Steve Spurrier, especially the games he beat the Ol' Ball Coach.
On player unionization: I don't think that will go over. I think it's best that it doesn't go over. When a kid starts getting his own lawyer to tell you and the university how much to pay him, that's going too far.

On rivalry with Steve Spurrier: That was always a great motivating ballgame with Spurrier. The reason is, he was kind of an offensive genius so I always liked it when we'd outscore him, which we did a lot. He's one of the greatest coaches there has ever been though. Those were great matchups.

On the College Football Playoff and committee invite: I was not invited to join, but there were some rumors. I'm interested to see how that comes out. How do you keep your prejudices out of it? If you're a graduate of Oklahoma and it comes time to vote, are you really going to pick Oklahoma State?

I kind of liked it the way it was. They always got 1 vs. 2 right. Who cares about 3 or 4?

And the best answer of the day:

On what he would do if his statue on campus came to life: I wouldn't want to stop it. Keep raging.
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Winning championships in college football no longer requires having an experienced quarterback.

Last year's BCS national title game featured a pair of teams who started a redshirt freshman (Florida State's Jameis Winston) and a junior-college transfer (Auburn's Nick Marshall) under center. Notre Dame made it to the title game the year before with a redshirt freshman quarterback (Everett Golson). Michigan State won the Big Ten and the Rose Bowl last season with a first-year starting quarterback (though Connor Cook did get some valuable experience in the bowl game the previous season). Johnny Manziel won the Heisman Trophy as a redshirt freshman, just as Winston did.

That's a long-winded way of saying that Ohio State's 2014 season is not over simply because Braxton Miller is out for the year after re-injuring his throwing shoulder.

[+] EnlargeMark Dantonio
Allen Kee/ESPN ImagesIf Braxton Miller is forced to miss significant time, Mark Dantonio and the Spartans become the clear preseason favorite in the Big Ten.
Who knows? Maybe J.T. Barrett, Ohio State's new starting quarterback, will surprise us all.

Yet that unknown is also why the entire 2014 Big Ten race has been flipped on its head after Miller's unfortunate injury. All the Las Vegas sports books and virtually every preseason prognostication hailed the Buckeyes as the league favorite based primarily on two reasons: 1) the vast potential of Ohio State's young, blue-chip talent, and 2) the presence of Miller, the two-time reigning Big Ten offensive player of the year.

Now, virtually Urban Meyer's entire team, outside of its star-studded defensive line, is made up of question marks. Remember that Ohio State was already replacing four-fifths of its starting offensive line this season, a situation seemingly made less worrisome because of Miller's ability to improvise out of the pocket. We think Ezekiel Elliott and several of the young skill players will be terrific, but there is no proven safety net along the lines of Carlos Hyde and Philly Brown. Questions also exist in the defensive back seven.

Because of all those young players in key spots, I was never quite as high on the Buckeyes as some national experts were. I thought Michigan State was just as deserving of the favorite's role, given that the Spartans beat Ohio State in last season's league title game and get to host the Buckeyes in East Lansing on Nov. 8. Now, Michigan State becomes the clear preseason favorite, in my view.

Other teams, including Wisconsin, Iowa and Nebraska in the West and even Michigan and Maryland in the East, have to feel slightly better today about their chances of winning the conference championship.

Still, there's no doubt that a weakened Ohio State could hurt the entire Big Ten. Fairly or not, the Buckeyes have often been viewed as the standard-bearer for the league, and they were considered prime College Football Playoff contenders for 2014. The league already faces an uphill fight against its national perception problems, and Miller's injury raises the specter of critics dismissing the Big Ten champ as a team that merely took advantage of Ohio State's problems. If the Buckeyes are not a strong, top 10 type of team, then that could take away credibility for Michigan State even if the Spartans do beat Meyer's team in East Lansing.

It's not quite as bad as 2012, when Ohio State went 12-0 on probation and a 7-5 Wisconsin team claimed the Big Ten title. But Miller's injury clearly creates an impact beyond Columbus.

Don't expect the Buckeyes to collapse -- at least by their lofty standards -- as they did in 2011, when the tattoo scandal prompted the firing of coach Jim Tressel and the departure of quarterback Terrelle Pryor in the offseason. This team remains supremely talented, blessed with arguably more speed and athleticism than Meyer had in his first two years (when he went a mere 24-2). If Barrett can work through his growing pains in some early-season tests, including Navy in the opener and Virginia Tech in Week 2, Ohio State could still roll through the first half of its schedule. Presumably, a battle-tested Barrett would then be far more ready to take on second-half challenges at Penn State, at Michigan State and against Michigan.

But the key is that these are all hypothetical propositions, and Ohio State has no sure things any longer at its most important position. Because of that, the entire Big Ten looks a lot different than it did 24 hours ago.
With the College Football Playoff finally here, we will be meticulously dissecting every game with any team anyone thinks could find itself in this year's final four.

People have voiced their concern about a playoff taking away the importance of every game. You guys can be scared, but I'm not. Games will still be big, and will affect the playoff. All that's happening now is that some early games might not end the season for some teams.

Oh, what a crime!

[+] EnlargeGus Malzahn
Marvin Gentry/USA TODAY SportsGus Malzahn and his Tigers face five key games this season that could alter their playoff hopes.
And honestly, we've seen teams lose in the middle of the season and still make it to the BCS national title game (I see you Alabama), so I think this is getting blown way out of proportion.

SEC teams vying for a playoff spot -- or two -- could likely get away with one loss, but you can never be too careful with the human element. Winning is still the goal.

There are going to be quite a few games that impact the playoff this season. Here are the top 10 games involving SEC teams that will affect the playoff (in order of appearance):

1. Wisconsin vs. LSU (in Houston, Texas), Aug. 30: If Wisconsin is going to push itself past Big Ten favorites Michigan State and Ohio State, the Badgers need to start off fast with a win against LSU. The Tigers have questions on both sides of the ball, but people will be salivating over seeing the matchup between Wisconsin running back Melvin Gordon and LSU's incredibly athletic front seven. These are the games LSU coach Les Miles thrives in, but Wisconsin won't be intimidated.

2. Georgia at South Carolina, Sept. 13: A lot of people think the winner of this game will head back to Atlanta. The winner will also have a clearer path to the playoff and could serve as an early elimination game. Last season, we saw 71 points, 990 yards and just one turnover in the Bulldogs' thrilling win in Athens. This time, the game is in Columbia, where the Gamecocks have won two straight against the Dawgs.

3. LSU at Auburn, Oct. 4: Even though Auburn lost this game last season, it changed the dynamic of the team's season. The fight and comeback they had in the second half injected an incredible amount of confidence into an Auburn team that ran all the way to the final BCS title game. Could this game have the same affect for either squad in 2014? With the upcoming schedules both of these teams have, a loss here could throw off their playoff plans.

4. Alabama at Ole Miss, Oct. 4: A lot of folks already have this game circled as the conference's first big upset of the season. And why not? Alabama might be the SEC favorite, but it's far from perfect and will be breaking in a new starting quarterback against an Ole Miss defense that has a fierce two-deep. A win for Ole Miss, which has its highest expectations in years, would propel the Rebels into the thick of playoff talk.

5. South Carolina at Auburn, Oct. 25: Another game involving the defending SEC champs, and this one will be very important for both teams. Each should be right at or near the top of their respective divisions just before the final month of the season, meaning this game is important for both the playoff and the SEC. Expect a lot of points with two teams that averaged more than 30 points a game last season and have some defensive unknowns. You want to enter November controlling your own destiny.

6. Auburn at Ole Miss, Nov. 1: If both of are undefeated when the Tigers arrive in the Grove, this game will have major playoff implications. Even if they aren't, the SEC Western Division will still be on the line, and we all know the eventual SEC champion will be an almost lock to make it in the playoff. The playoff picture will be much clearer when these two meet, and as the season ticks down, you want to control your own destiny.

7. Alabama at LSU, Nov. 8: Of course this game will affect the playoff. It's Alabama-LSU! Ever since Nick Saban arrived in Tuscaloosa in 2007, this game has been decided by less than 10 points six times. However, Alabama has won the past two by 21 points. Both of these teams will know a whole lot more about each other at this point in the season, and while Alabama could be at the top of the polls, LSU's young talent could become dangerous.

8. South Carolina at Florida, Nov. 15: If South Carolina is going to make the playoff, the Gamecocks will need to win this game. We can't quite put our finger on Florida, but a loss to a bad Florida team isn't getting you any playoff love. But what if Florida is a contender in the East? Well, the division could be on the line, and it's going to be very hard for any team not playing in its conference title game to make the playoff.

9. Auburn at Georgia, Nov. 15: We all know how last season's game ended. One bat down, and Auburn's Cinderella story is short-lived. You know the Dawgs have this game circled on their calendar. It's another game that could have SEC title implications, and of course that means it will affect the playoff with the season winding down. A loss for Auburn would likely end its playoff chances, while a win for a Georgia team in the East hunt would do wonders.

10. Auburn at Alabama, Nov. 29: The Iron Bowl changed the landscape of the BCS title game last season and we have no reason to believe it won't have an impact on this year's College Football Playoff. Remember the “Kick Six?” Well, you better believe Alabama does. The Crimson Tide gets its archrival at home this year and Saban is 8-1 at Alabama in revenge games. The loser of this game will be without bragging rights and a playoff spot.

Emergency plan: OSU's backup QBs

August, 19, 2014
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With the news that Ohio State QB Braxton Miller is out for the season with an injury to his throwing shoulder, it’s time to get to know who will be taking snaps for the Buckeyes this fall.

J.T. Barrett
  • The redshirt freshman only ascended to the No. 2 spot over the weekend, just in time to be in position to take the reins of the spread offense if Miller's shoulder is seriously damaged. The 6-foot-1, 225-pound Barrett has the weakest arm of the three top quarterbacks on the roster, and the coaching staff has had no problem admitting that because he makes up for it with above-average tools everywhere else across the board. Offensive coordinator Tom Herman has praised Barrett since the moment he signed for his cerebral approach to the game, pinpoint accuracy and the sort of athleticism required to run Ohio State's offense even after suffering an ACL injury as a senior in high school. At this point, the Buckeyes elevated Barrett to the backup spot simply because, as Herman said Monday, "the offense moves better when he's in there."
Cardale Jones
  • With his impressive size at 6-5 and 250 pounds, plenty of speed and the ability to overpower defenders as a rusher, Jones looked like the heir apparent in claiming the backup job during spring practice while Miller was on the shelf following surgery. The redshirt sophomore has a rocket for a right arm, but it doesn't always fire in the right direction and inconsistent accuracy has been regularly cited as the biggest hurdle for Jones in the passing game. He has a slight edge in experience with the program after enrolling in January 2012, putting him on campus for the entirety of coach Urban Meyer's tenure with the Buckeyes, but he has attempted only a pair of passes in live action with one completion for 3 yards. He has showed off his mobility during his few chances to play, rushing 17 times for 132 yards with a touchdown.

Virginia Cavaliers season preview

August, 19, 2014
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Previewing the 2014 season for the Virginia Cavaliers:

Key returners: RB Kevin Parks, RB Taquan Mizzell, S Anthony Harris, DE Eli Harold, LB Henry Coley

Key losses: TE Jake McGee, OT Morgan Moses, DE Jake Snyder, DT Brent Urban

Most important 2014 games: UCLA, Aug. 30; Miami, Nov. 22; at Virginia Tech, Nov. 28

Projected win percentage: 37 percent

Over/under Vegas odds: 3

[+] EnlargeKevin Parks
AP Photo/Andrew ShurtleffRunning back Kevin Parks is among the few proven performers Virginia returns on offense.
Instant impact newcomers: Defensive tackle Andrew Brown and safety Quin Blanding. There is little doubt that the two highest-rated players in the 2014 signing class will play for the Cavs this season. Brown has had a little setback in dealing with a turf toe injury that has bothered him since the spring. But when he is healthy, he will be a contributor on a defensive line that needs depth at tackle. Blanding has been working with the first-team defense since spring practice opened. By all accounts, he is as good as advertised.

Best-case scenario for 2014: Greyson Lambert brings consistency to the quarterback position, allowing the offense to flourish. The defense improves on the gains it made from a season ago, and the Hoos cut down on penalties and turnovers. Parks turns in another 1,000-yard season, and playmaker receivers emerge to help Virginia pull several upsets, end a long losing streak to rival Virginia Tech, make a bowl and become the surprise team in the ACC.

Worst-case scenario for 2014: Quarterback remains an issue behind Lambert, and the offensive line fails to gain any cohesion. Without any stability up front or behind Lambert, Virginia continues to struggle to move the ball and score points. Defensively, Virginia continues to give up too many big plays. One of the toughest schedules in the ACC does the Cavaliers no favors, and they sink to their third straight losing season.

They said it: "The identity is one of unity. You can talk about, well, how does that happen? Last year, we had four seniors. This year, we have 22. There's a maturation process that takes place when you have teams that are looking for leaders, that are looking for an identity. … The expectations of performing are paramount for us." -- coach Mike London.

Biggest question mark: How much time do we have? Outside of Parks, the entire offense remains a question mark. The offensive line has not been solidified yet; Lambert remains a wild card; and there is no go-to player among the receivers with McGee gone. Virginia is in desperate need of a big-play threat in the receiver group and a quarterback who can limit the mistakes. We still don’t know whether both will come to fruition for this team in 2014.
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Previewing the 2014 season for the Washington State Cougars:

2013 record: 6-7, 4-5 Pac-12, lost to Colorado State in the Gildan New Mexico Bowl, 48-45

[+] EnlargeConnor Halliday
AP Photo/Chris CarlsonSenior QB Connor Halliday will lead the Cougars this season, starting off Aug. 28 against Rutgers.
Final grade for 2013: B

Key returnees: QB Connor Halliday, WR Gabe Marks, WR Vince Mayle, WR River Cracraft, DL Xavier Cooper

Key losses: S Deone Bucannon, OLB Justin Sagote, C Elliott Bosch, OL John Fullington, K Andrew Furney

Projected win percentage (ESPN.com Stats & Information): .425

Chances to win the conference (ESPN.com Stats & Information): 0.1 percent

Instant impact newcomer: CB Marcellus Pippins

Most important game: Saturday, Nov. 29 vs. Washington

Biggest question mark: The offense will put up numbers because of Mike Leach, but can the defense make big stops ... or at least enough stops?

Best-case scenario: 8-4

Worst-case scenario: 4-8 with just one conference win

Over-under win total (Bovada): 5.5

Upset special: Saturday, Sept. 20 vs. Oregon. The Ducks have to come into Pullman, Washington, and it's just early enough in the season that if Marcus Mariota hasn't gained enough chemistry with his young receivers, the Cougars could put a notch on the Ducks' record.

They said it: On whether Leach would rather bear hunt with Washington coach Chris Petersen or Utah coach Kyle Whittingham: “What I'm thinking is we get a large bag and we stick in Coach Petersen, Coach Whittingham, and we shake that bag up really high and really hard. That will be a tough guy to walk out of the bag, I think.”

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