NCF Nation: Andrew Donnal

Let's look at what to expect this spring in the Big Ten's wild, wild West:

ILLINOIS

Spring start: March 5
Spring game: April 12

What to watch:
  • Toughening up on 'D': The Fighting Illini had one of the nation's worst defenses, especially against the run. Tim Beckman brought back defensive coordinator Tim Banks and hopes an extra year of maturity can help strengthen the front seven. Juco import Joe Fotu could win a starting job this spring, and Jihad Ward should help when he arrives in the summer.
  • 'Haase cleaning: Nathan Scheelhaase wrapped up his career by leading the Big Ten in passing yards last season. Oklahoma State transfer Wes Lunt likely takes over the reins, but backups Reilly O'Toole and Aaron Bailey plan on fighting for the job, as well. Bill Cubit's offense should equal big numbers for whoever wins out.
  • Target practice: Whoever wins the quarterback job needs someone to catch the ball, and Illinois' top two receivers from '13 -- Steve Hull and Miles Osei -- both are gone. Junior college arrival Geronimo Allison will be counted on for some immediate help.
IOWA

Spring start: March 27 or 28
Spring game: April 26

What to watch:
  • A new big three: The Hawkeyes begin the process of trying to replace their three standout senior linebackers from last season: James Morris, Anthony Hitchens and Christian Kirksey. They were the heart of the defense in 2013, and now guys such as Quinton Alston, Reggie Spearman and Travis Perry need to make major leaps forward in the spring.
  • Develop more playmakers: Iowa was able to win the games it should have won last year, but struggled against those with strong defenses because of its lack of explosiveness. Sophomore Tevaun Smith and junior Damond Powell showed flashes of their potential late in the year at wideout. They need to continue to develop to give quarterback Jake Rudock and the offense ways to stretch the field.
  • Solidify the right tackle spot: The offensive line should once again be the team's strength, but the departure of veteran right tackle Brett Van Sloten means someone has to take on that role. Whether that's senior Andrew Donnal or redshirt freshman Ryan Ward could be determined this spring.
MINNESOTA

Spring start: March 4
Spring game: April 12

What to watch:
  • Mitch's pitches: Philip Nelson's transfer means redshirt sophomore Mitch Leidner enters spring practice as the No. 1 quarterback. He's a load to bring down when he runs, but Leidner needs to improve his passing accuracy after completing 55 percent of his passes in the regular season and only half of his 22 attempts in the Texas Bowl game loss to Syracuse. Added experience should help. If not, he's got some talented youngsters such as Chris Streveler and Dimonic Roden-McKinzy aiming to dethrone him.
  • Mitch's catchers: Of course, part of the problem behind the Gophers' Big Ten-worst passing offense was a lack of threats at receiver. Drew Wolitarsky and Donovahn Jones showed promise as true freshmen and should only improve with an offseason of work. It's critical that they do, or else Minnesota might have to count on three receiver signees early.
  • Replacing Ra'Shede: The Gophers only lost four senior starters, but defensive tackle Ra'Shede Hageman might be the most difficult to replace. The first-team All-Big Ten selection created havoc inside defensively, and there aren't many athletes like him floating around. Scott Ekpe could take many of Hageman's reps, but the defensive line overall will have to pick up the slack.
NEBRASKA

Spring start: March 8
Spring game: April 12

What to watch:
  • Tommy's turn: Sophomore Tommy Armstrong Jr. entered the offseason as the clear No. 1 quarterback for the first time after taking over for the injured Taylor Martinez (and splitting some snaps with Ron Kellogg III) last season. Armstrong showed maturity beyond his years in 2013 but needs to continue developing as a passer and deepen his understanding of the offense. Redshirt freshman Johnny Stanton could push him in the spring.
  • Get the OL up to speed: Nebraska loses a lot of experience on the offensive line, including both starting tackles (Jeremiah Sirles and Brent Qvale), plus interior mainstays Spencer Long, Andrew Rodriguez and Cole Pensick. The Huskers do return seniors Mark Pelini, Jake Cotton and Mike Moudy, junior Zach Sterup, plus three freshmen and a junior-college transfer who redshirted last year. A strong group of incoming freshmen may also contribute. Big Red usually figures it out on the O-line, but there will be a lot of players in new roles this season.
  • Reload in the secondary: The Blackshirts have plenty of experience in the front seven, but the defensive backfield has a new coach (Charlton Warren) and will be without top playmakers Stanley Jean-Baptiste and Ciante Evans. The safety spot next to Corey Cooper was a problem area last season, and the Huskers are hoping Charles Jackson takes a major step forward. Warren has talent to work with but must find the right combination.
NORTHWESTERN

Spring start: Feb. 26
Spring game: April 12

What to watch:
  • Trevor's time?: Trevor Siemian split reps with Kain Colter at quarterback the past two seasons, serving as sort of the designated passer. Siemian threw for 414 yards in the season finale against Illinois and has a clear path toward starting with Colter gone. That could mean more of a pass-first offense than Northwestern ran with Colter. Redshirt freshman and heralded recruit Matt Alviti also looms as an option.
  • Manning the middle: Northwestern brings back a solid corps on defense but lost middle linebacker Damien Proby, who led the team in tackles the past two seasons. Pat Fitzgerald has some options, including making backups Drew Smith or Jaylen Prater a starter or moving Collin Ellis inside. He can experiment and find the best match this spring.
  • Patch it together: The Wildcats' health woes from 2013 aren't over, as 11 players will be held out of practice for medical reasons, including star running back/returner Venric Mark. Add in that the school doesn't have early enrollees, and the team will be trying to practice severely undermanned this spring. The biggest key is to get through spring without any more major problems and to get the injured guys healthy for the fall.
PURDUE

Spring start: March 6
Spring game: April 12

What to watch:
  • Moving forward: Purdue players wore T-shirts emblazoned with the word "Forward" during winter workouts, and no wonder. They don't want to look backward to last year's abysmal 1-11 season. It's time to turn the page and get some positive momentum going in Year 2 under Darrell Hazell. Luckily, optimism abounds in spring.
  • Trench focus: The Boilermakers simply couldn't cut it on the lines in Big Ten play, and Hazell went about trying to sign bigger offensive linemen this offseason for his physical style of play. Both starting tackles and three starting defensive linemen all graduated, and no one should feel safe about his job after last season's performance. Kentucky transfer Langston Newton (defense) and early enrollee Kirk Barron (offense) could push for playing time on the lines.
  • Find an identity: What was Purdue good at last season? Not much, as the team ranked near the bottom of the country in just about every major statistical category. The Boilers found some good things late in the passing game with freshmen Danny Etling and DeAngelo Yancey, but Hazell must do a better job instilling the toughness he wants and locating playmakers.
WISCONSIN

Spring start: March 7
Spring game: April 12

What to watch:
  • Catching on: The biggest concern heading into the spring is at receiver after the team's only dependable wideout the past two seasons, Jared Abbrederis, graduated. Tight end Jacob Pedersen, who was second on the team in receiving yards last season, is also gone. The Badgers have struggled to develop new weapons in the passing game but now have no choice. Gary Andersen signed five receivers in the 2014 class but none enrolled early, so guys such as Kenzel Doe and Robert Wheelwright need to take charge this spring.
  • Stave-ing off the competition?: Joel Stave started all 13 games at quarterback last year, while no one else on the roster has any real experience under center. Yet the redshirt junior should face some competition this spring after the Badgers' passing game struggled down the stretch. Andersen likes more mobile quarterbacks and has three guys in Bart Houston, Tanner McEvoy and freshman early enrollee D.J. Gillins, who can offer that skill. Stave must hold them off to keep his job.
  • New leaders on defense: Wisconsin lost a large group of seniors, including nine major contributors on the defensive side. That includes inside linebacker and team leader Chris Borland, plus defensive linemen Beau Allen and Ethan Hemer, outside linebacker Brendan Kelly and safety Dezmen Southward. That's a whole lot of leadership and production to replace, and the process begins in earnest this spring.
Big Ten spring football is finally in full swing as Iowa on Wednesday became the 12th and final league team to hit the practice field. The return to the gridiron can't come a moment too soon for the Hawkeyes, who went 4-8 in 2012, their worst record since coach Kirk Ferentz's second season at the helm (2000). It has been another offseason of transition for Iowa as Ferentz welcomes three new full-time assistants (Chris White, Bobby Kennedy and Jim Reid) for a second consecutive year. Finding a quarterback tops Iowa's spring agenda, and the team also needs to identify a center and more playmakers on both sides of the ball.

ESPN.com caught up with Ferentz on Wednesday to discuss the spring.

What are the main objectives for you guys this spring?

Kirk Ferentz: Like any spring, you've got a lot of players on a lot of different levels. You've got experienced players, and we're certainly counting on them improving and developing into leaders. You've got younger guys who have played, and you're hoping they're ready to play more proficiently. And then you've got other guys who, in some cases, are special-teams guys who have a chance to become offensive and defensive role players, or guys who haven't been on the field yet. So you have a lot of layers of players at different levels. The biggest thing is trying to gauge where they're at, and at the same time, you're trying to find out what they can do and pull a team together. It's always a fun period and a really interesting period.

How has the transition on the staff this year gone so far, especially in relation to last year? You had quite a long period without any changes on your staff.

KF: Last year was probably a little more dramatic with two new coordinators. Norm [Parker] and Ken [O'Keefe] were here 13 years, so they were big departures. We've got Phil [Parker] and Greg [Davis] both in their second years, and they're both tremendous coaches. What's unusual is how long we were all together at one time. Usually staffs don't stay in one place for 13, 14 years. Normally they move to the next channel and you have a new group of folks coming in. So it's a natural series of transitions. The way I look at it, we've had six new members join the staff in the last two years, and it's a matter of pulling everything together. But I'm really excited about all the guys who have joined. They're outstanding coaches, and it looks like they're all going to be great fits here at Iowa. At the same time, I'm very appreciative of the guys who had been here and helped us move things.

Is the transition harder for the players or the new coaches?

KF: There's learning on both sides. The players to have learn their coaches, certainly, and the coaches have a lot to learn about the players. That can be a healthy thing, too. It's a clean slate and a fresh beginning for everybody. For players, it's a whole new opportunity.

Offensively, it wasn't what you were hoping for last year. Is it a total reset this year with some new faces, or are there some things you can continue from last year?

[+] EnlargeKirk Ferentz
Byron Hetzler/USA TODAY SportsThough Kirk Ferentz lost his starting quarterback and center, he said he's more optimistic about Iowa's offense than he was a year ago.
KF: It may be ironic. We feel more comfortable and more optimistic right now than we did a year ago about the offense. The part that's ironic is we lost a two-year starter at quarterback [James Vandenberg]. We had James play a lot at quarterback and James Ferentz played like 38 games at center, so you have two guys right in the middle of things who aren't going to be there. But I look around at other positions and we've got a lot of guys coming back who have played in the system and who I think are more capable now of playing at a higher level than they were a year ago. That's got us excited. That being said, we've got to find replacements for both Jameses. We've got to find a replacement for Keenan Davis and Matt Tobin, to start with. But I look at the group coming back and as recent as late last August, we didn't know if Damon Bullock could play in this conference successfully, and we had no idea Mark Weisman could run the ball. So I think we're a lot further down the road than we were even eight months ago, 10 months ago.

When you and Greg looked at things, did you identify areas to target for the spring?

KF: Greg came in, this was all new to him, the players were all new to him. His knowledge of our personnel is a lot more extensive than it was a year ago at this time. And that was one of the reasons I was so attracted to Greg in the hiring process, his ability historically to work with a lot of different types of players and different types of offenses. He wasn't married to one system. There's nothing like experience, and he's got a real good grip on who our players are, what they can do and what we can do to help them be more productive.

(Read full post)

Big Ten weekend rewind: Week 8

October, 22, 2012
10/22/12
10:06
AM ET
Take that and rewind it back.

Team of the week: Penn State. Plenty of candidates this week, as Michigan ended Michigan State's four-game winning streak in the rivalry, Nebraska got a much-needed road victory and Wisconsin kept chopping in the Axe series. But no team was as impressive as the Nittany Lions, who went on the road in a hostile atmosphere and simply dismantled Iowa from start to finish in a 38-14 win. That was as complete a performance as you're going to see in this league, and as Adam wrote on Saturday, Bill O'Brien's team is no longer just a nice little story.

[+] EnlargeKenny Guiton
Greg Bartram/US PresswireBackup quarterback Kenny Guiton led the Buckeyes to an overtime win against Purdue on Saturday.
Game of the week: Lots of good ones, including Michigan's nailbiter over Michigan State, Nebraska's comeback over Northwestern and even Indiana's loss at Navy. But for pure drama, it's hard to beat the Ohio State-Purdue game and how it ended. To review: the Buckeyes trailed by eight points and took possession at their 39-yard line with less than a minute to go. Braxton Miller was in the hospital and backup Kenny Guiton was at quarterback. Somehow, Ohio State made it work, driving for a touchdown and then the tying two-point conversion on a beautifully designed play. There seemed to be little doubt who would win in overtime after that, though Urban Meyer seemed stunned after the 29-22 decision. "I'm still trying to figure this bad boy out," he said. "We won, right?"

Biggest play: The first play of that Ohio State tying drive was a 39-yard completion from Guiton to Devin Smith that made everything else possible. It was a slow-developing play that the Buckeyes were a little hesitant to call because it demands such good protection by the O-line. Maybe too good, as Purdue coach Danny Hope complained that his defense "probably would have [gotten to Guiton] if we didn't have quite so many hooks and so many hands on our jerseys." Regardless, it was still a play that will go down in Ohio State lore.

Best call: It came in a losing effort, but we enjoyed seeing the return of Mark Dantonio's gambling special-teams ways in Michigan State's loss to Michigan. On fourth-and-9 from the Spartans' 23-yard line early in the fourth quarter, punter Mike Sadler sprinted for a 26-yard gain. That extended a drive that led to the field goal that put Michigan State up 10-9. I just wish Dantonio had been as aggressive on the fourth-and-1 from Michigan's 21-yard line earlier in the game, when the Spartans went for the field goal -- and missed it.

Best new wrinkle: It sometimes feels as if Wisconsin doesn't need a quarterback, given its strength at offensive line and depth at tailback. The Badgers gave that idea a try Saturday against Minnesota, putting running back James White at quarterback and using seven offensive lineman, two tight ends and Montee Ball as a receiver. They called it the "Barge" formation because of how many large humans were involved. White ran four times out of the "Barge" and gained 30 yards, including a 14-yard touchdown. That gives defenses something else to think about, and Bielema said there are plays where White can throw out of the formation.

Big Man on Campus (Offense): Taylor Martinez has gotten crushed for his failures on the road, so it's only fair that he should be praised for winning an important game away from Lincoln. Granted, Northwestern had a couple of chances to pick him off in the fourth quarter, and if that happens, the narrative for Nebraska and Martinez is a whole lot different right now. But Martinez deserves credit for leading fourth-quarter scoring drives of 80 and 76 yards and finishing 27-of-39 passing for 342 yards with three touchdowns and -- most important -- no interceptions. He also rushed for 65 yards and a score.

Big Man on Campus (Defense): Penn State's linebackers have gotten the, um, Lions' share of attention this season on the defense. But senior defensive tackle Jordan Hill made himself known against Iowa, recording nine tackles, including two for loss, a sack and a quarterback hurry. Iowa finished with only 20 rushing yards.

Big Man on Campus (Special teams): Here's what I imagine Brendan Gibbons was thinking before his game-winning, 38-yard kick against Michigan State: "Zooey Deschanel, Mila Kunis, Natalie Portman." Actually, Gibbons said this time he was thinking about the Michigan seniors, not brunette girls as he was before hitting the game-winner in the Sugar Bowl. But this one was just as big, and one of his three field goals on the day in a 12-10 win. A hardy shout out goes to Matt Wile, who booted a 48-yarder for the Wolverines, and to Purdue's Akeem Hunt for his 100-yard kickoff return against Ohio State.

Worst hangover: Purdue, Michigan State and Northwestern are all solid nominees here, but Iowa wins the least-coveted award in the rewind. Not only were the Hawkeyes destroyed at home by Penn State, they also lost starting left tackle Brandon Scherff to injury for at least the rest of the regular season, and starting guard Andrew Donnal may be out a while as well. That was Iowa's third home loss of the season already. The Hawkeyes still have no passing game, and while they can salvage something out of this season, things look a lot less promising than they did a week ago.

Strangest moment: Northwestern had to go to a silent count for its final drive of the game against Nebraska. Which wouldn't have been weird, except that the Wildcats were playing at home. Ryan Field has never been the most intimidating home atmosphere, and Nebraska fans invaded in such large numbers and made so much noise that it felt like a road game for the Northwestern players at the end. "We didn't prepare for that all week," quarterback Kain Colter told the Chicago Tribune about the silent count.
Some bad but not surprising news from Iowa on Sunday, as starting left tackle Brandon Scherff will miss several months after undergoing surgery to repair a leg injury suffered in Saturday night's loss to Penn State.

Hawkeyes coach Kirk Ferentz said Scherff will miss "a couple months" with what is reportedly a broken right fibula and a dislocated ankle. The injury looked gruesome on television replays, and Scherff was taken from the field on a cart in the first quarter of Iowa's 38-14 loss. Nolan MacMillan took over for Scherff and likely will remain as the Hawkeyes' top left tackle.

Ferentz said after the game that Scherff likely would miss the rest of the season.

Iowa is still awaiting a status report on guard Andrew Donnal, who left the game with a knee injury. Ferentz told hawkeyesports.com that additional tests are being done on Donnal and he would know more later in the week.

Rough time for the Iowa offense right now.

Penn State is for real, folks.

Bill O'Brien has worked wonders with a limited roster in his first year as Nittany Lions head coach, and his team appears to be getting better every week. On Saturday night, Penn State waltzed into Kinnick Stadium -- a house of horrors for this program in the past -- and absolutely threw the hammer down on an Iowa team that came in riding a wave of confidence. The offense is clicking in ways we haven't seen in years from Penn State, and the defense is locking things down. The Lions are playing as well as anybody in the Big Ten right now, and nobody expected that.

Here's a look at how Saturday's wildly impressive 38-14 blowout of the Hawkeyes went down:

It was over when ... Penn State recovered a James Vandenberg fumble at the Iowa 14 and, two plays later, capitalized with a Bill Belton touchdown run. That made it 24-0 with 5:53 still left in the first half, and the rout was officially on.

Game ball goes to: Quarterback Matt McGloin. The fifth-year senior is the league's best pro-style quarterback, which is still a shocking development. He's had a great season and showed his burgeoning mastery of O'Brien's offense with a crisp performance, going 26-of-38 for 289 yards and two touchdowns, with no interceptions. The defense also needs some major recognition after holding Iowa to zero offensive points until the final five minutes of the game.

Stat of the game: Iowa had just 21 rushing yards for the game, including five in the first half. Mark Weisman's ankle injury probably had something to do with that (he had just 9 yards on five carries) but Penn State's defense also played a large role. When the Hawkeyes can't run the ball effectively, they're pretty much toast. Extra-crispy burnt toast, in this case.

Unsung hero of the game: Penn State running back Belton was healthy for the first time since he hurt his ankle in the opener, and he ran 16 times for 103 yards and three touchdowns. Belton brings a much-needed speed element to the Nittany Lions' backfield.

What it means: During the bye week, O'Brien described Penn State's remaining schedule as "Murderers' Row." Well, his team played the executioner tonight. That's five straight wins for the Nittany Lions, and astute Associated Press poll voters will give them serious consideration for the Top 25 this week. A win next week over Ohio State at home could put Penn State in line for a Leaders Division title, even if that doesn't equal any postseason opportunity. The Nittany Lions will be extremely tough for any league team to handle the rest of the way if they can stay relatively healthy.

For Iowa, its 2-0 start in the Big Ten was exposed as potentially fraudulent with this train wreck of a performance at home. The Hawkeyes still don't appear strong enough offensively to hang with the best teams in the Big Ten, and a defense that had been playing at a high level lately was destroyed by O'Brien's attack. It was a costly loss, too, as two starting offensive linemen -- left tackle Brandon Scherff and guard Andrew Donnal -- left the game with what looked like serious leg injuries in the first half. For an offense already struggling to score points, that's a tough blow. The Legends race isn't out of reach, since this was a cross-division game. But the Hawkeyes still have difficult games left with Northwestern, Michigan and Nebraska.

Iowa recruiting analysis

February, 4, 2010
2/04/10
11:35
AM ET
Iowa Hawkeyes

The class

Recruits: 21 (all high school seniors, two players have enrolled early)

Top prospects: Tight end C.J. Fiedorowicz is an ESPNU 150 selection who should challenge for playing time right away following the departure of Tony Moeaki. Offensive tackle Andrew Donnal certainly fits the mold at Iowa, which always produces great O-linemen. Marcus Coker won't contribute right away at a crowded running back position, but he'll be very good down the line. Athlete A.J. Derby will find a spot on the field early in his career.

Sleepers: Linebacker James Morris could end up being a key contributor for the Hawkeyes defense. Austin Vier is an intriguing prospect who will get a shot at quarterback but likely will move to tight end.

Needs met: Iowa will need to reload along the defensive line beginning in 2011, so five recruits at either end or tackle should help. The same goes at linebacker. The offensive line has a few question marks this year, and while Donnal could step in as a freshman, both he and Brandon Scherff will help in the future. This class addresses the tight end position for years to come.

Analysis: Arguably no staff in the Big Ten gets more out of less than Iowa's coaches, so fans clamoring for five-star recruits should simply consult the history books. Iowa doesn't need immediate help at too many positions, though Fiedorowicz could be a key contributor this season alongside Allen Reisner. There's a lot of versatility in this class, so it will be interesting to see what Kirk Ferentz and his assistants do with players like Derby and Vier.

Scouts Inc. grade: B-minus

What Kirk Ferentz said:

  • "This year we went a little heavier maybe on defense, certainly with three of our four defensive linemen next year being seniors. The next two guys being juniors. It was real important to us to get some guys in that we felt could be involved right away. And same thing with our linebacker position, we've got a heavy group of seniors next year. We just graduated two outstanding players [Pat Angerer and A.J. Edds]. So those are two positions we felt were really, it was important to fortify."
  • (On A.J. Derby) "He's a winner. And on top of that, you know, we think he's got a lot of upside at the quarterback position. If that doesn't work down the road, there's probably a lot of things he could do. ... That's our intent is for him to play quarterback. We're eager to see how he can progress and improve. And if things change in our style a little bit, that's fine."
  • "There aren't too many guys we're counting on to save our team next year. But they're really going to be important in our future. And we'll have the discussion down the road possibly about are you going to be a special teams guy, a back-up guy, get your feet wet, and then we're going to have a lot of vacancies a year from now. I know that."

PSU, Iowa, MSU sign classes

February, 3, 2010
2/03/10
6:11
PM ET

Penn State has announced the signings of 20 players who make up the Big Ten's top recruiting class for 2010. Although Penn State's class fell one spot to No. 8 in ESPN's rankings today, the Nittany Lions had one of the nation's most complete classes, particularly on the defensive side. Players like Dakota Royer, Khairi Fortt, Evan Hailes and several others should help Penn State very early in their careers. Quarterback Robert Bolden should compete for the starting job right away as the Nittany Lions try to replace Daryll Clark.

Iowa head coach Kirk Ferentz finalized a 21-man recruiting class that features several of the Midwest's top players. The Hawkeyes didn't land any ESPNU 150 prospects, but players like offensive lineman Andrew Donnal, running back Marcus Coker, tight end C.J. Fiedorowicz and athlete A.J. Derby all should be key contributors. Iowa's class really bolsters the defensive front with five linemen and three linebackers.

Michigan State hasn't sent out an official release just yet, but the Spartans' 21-man class is signed and sealed. Defensive-minded coach Mark Dantonio bolstered the defense with players like ESPNU 150 prospect William Gholston, linebacker Max Bullough and defensive backs Mylan Hicks. The Spartans also added depth at quarterback with Joe Boisture. This class might not have made quite as big a splash as last year's haul, but Michigan State once again did very well within the state and the Big Ten region.


Posted by ESPN.com's Adam Rittenberg

Illinois picks up a major commit at tight end, while Penn State bolsters its quarterback position and other teams add key pieces. Here's your latest recruiting rundown in the Big Ten.

ILLINOIS

  • 2010 verbal commits: 8
  • ESPNU 150 Watch List: Safety Corey Cooper, quarterback Chandler Whitmer, tight end C.J. Fiedorowicz
  • Quick take: Fiedorowicz is a big get for the Illini, who lose starting tight end Michael Hoomanawanui after the 2009 season. Illinois also will be breaking in a new starting quarterback and could lose superstar wideout Arrelious Benn to the NFL draft, so Fiedorowicz should be a big help during the transition.

INDIANA

  • 2010 verbal commits: 9
  • ESPNU 150 Watch List: None
  • Quick take: Things have slowed down a bit for the Hoosiers, who are still glowing from the commitment of defensive end Jibreel Black from Cincinnati. Indiana has found a good offense-defense balance so far in the 2010 class.

IOWA

  • 2010 verbal commits: 10
  • ESPNU 150 Watch List: Defensive end Matt Hoch, tackle Andrew Donnal
  • Quick take: Both lines have been the focus of Iowa's recruiting so far, and the Hawkeyes made a big splash with Donnal, who could protect his fellow Ohioan Ricky Stanzi at some point down the line. At least seven of Iowa's commits could contribute on the offensive or defensive lines.

MICHIGAN

  • 2010 verbal commits: 15
  • ESPNU 150 Watch List: Quarterback Devin Gardner, wide receiver Jeremy Jackson, wide receiver Ricardo Miller, guard Christian Pace, safety Marvin Robinson
  • Quick take: The nucleus for Michigan's 2010 class is in place, and the team hasn't added a commit since Courtney Avery on June 20. There are a ton of great athletes in this group, and Michigan likely will turn its attention to line play to wrap up the class.

MICHIGAN STATE

  • 2010 verbal commits: 9
  • ESPNU 150 Watch List: Defensive end William Gholston, linebacker Max Bullough, quarterback Joe Boisture
  • Quick take: After landing its first seven commits from within state borders, Michigan State went into enemy territory -- or Mark Dantonio's home state, depending on how you look at it -- to pick up offensive linemen Travis Jackson and Michael Dennis. The two Ohio natives balance out a class that is shaping up well for the Spartans.

MINNESOTA

  • 2010 verbal commits: 10
  • ESPNU 150 Watch List: None
  • Quick take: The Gophers already have a strong in-state recruiting haul, and they went to the southeast for running back Donnell Kirkwood, a workhorse-type back who generated a lot of interest. Minnesota also remains in the mix for arguably the nation's biggest prize, local product Seantrel Henderson.

NORTHWESTERN

  • 2010 verbal commits: 6
  • ESPNU 150 Watch List: None
  • Quick take: Pat Fitzgerald should never have a hard time recruiting linebackers, and Northwestern landed a good one -- with a good name -- in Chi Chi Ariguzo from Columbus, Ohio. Ariguzo can also play safety and should contribute on special teams early in his career. Northwestern has yet to land an in-state prospect.

OHIO STATE

  • 2010 verbal commits: 8
  • ESPNU 150 Watch List: Tackle Andrew Norwell, linebacker Jamel Turner, defensive end David Durham, running back Roderick Smith
  • Quick take: A quiet week for the Buckeyes after filling their backfield needs with Smith and quarterback Taylor Graham. Ohio State hopes to go back into Florida for star linebacker Jeff Luc and possibly linebacker Deon Rogers.

PENN STATE

  • 2010 verbal commits: 12
  • ESPNU 150 Watch List: Wide receiver Adrian Coxson, running back Silas Redd, center Miles Dieffenbach, defensive end Kyle Baublitz, defensive tackle Evan Hailes, quarterback Robert Bolden
  • Quick take: Does Penn State currently have the Big Ten's best recruiting class for 2010? It sure looks that way as Bolden gives the Nittany Lions six watch list commitments out of 12 overall. Both Bolden and Paul Jones should be able to operate effectively in the Spread HD offense.

PURDUE

  • 2010 verbal commits: 7
  • ESPNU 150 Watch List: Quarterback Robert Marve (2007 watch list)
  • Quick take: The quality of Purdue's commits seems to be getting better as quarterback Sean Robinson and defensive tackle Josh Davis came aboard. Robinson joins Marve and Caleb TerBush in the quarterback mix, while Davis boasts excellent size (6-foot-5, 250) for a young interior lineman.

WISCONSIN

  • 2010 verbal commits: 8
  • ESPNU 150 Watch List: Safety Frank Tamakloe
  • Quick take: The quarterback position might be a question mark this season, but it's shaping up well for the future as Joseph Brennan committed to the Badgers. Brennan has good mechanics and accuracy, and he should get better with increased strength. Cameron Ontko could be a contributor at fullback or H-back down the line.

SPONSORED HEADLINES