NCF Nation: Kevin Johns

Ohio State already had started paying more competitive salaries for assistant coaches before Urban Meyer arrived in November 2011.

But when Meyer and athletic director Gene Smith sat down to discuss staff pay, Smith soon realized he needed to do more.

"I think Michigan had stepped up with their coordinators," Smith recalled last week during Big Ten spring meetings in Chicago. "So we were already going to that before Urban Meyer came, but we bumped it up a little more. Any time there's change, you have that opportunity."

[+] EnlargeGreg Mattison
Lon Horwedel/Icon SMIMichigan DC Greg Mattison ranks as the highest-paid assistant coach in the Big Ten for the 2013 season.
"Everyone's always focused on head coaches' salaries," Smith continued. "That's always the thing. But really when you look at the changes, it's really been assistants' salaries across the country -- not just in the SEC, but the Big 12, Pac-12, all across the country."

The Big Ten is part of the change, too, as the league is allocating more money toward football assistants than ever before. The Detroit Free Press has an excellent look at Big Ten assistants' salaries, complete with a database that includes 10 of the 12 current members (Northwestern doesn't submit salaries as a private institution, and Penn State doesn't have to because of state laws).

The Free Press found that eight of the 10 schools are paying more for assistants in 2013 than they did in 2012 (only Indiana and Illinois are not). There are some significant total increases, such as Wisconsin (up $558,000), Nebraska (up $518,500), Purdue ($400,000) and Minnesota ($355,000). Staff pay had been an issue at Wisconsin, which lost six assistant coaches following the 2012 Rose Bowl, and at Purdue, which paid less for its staff during the Danny Hope era than any Big Ten school.

The total trend among the 10 schools is an increase of $1,720,852.24 for 2013.

Ohio State and Michigan remain No. 1 and No. 2 in Big Ten staff salary, as the Buckeyes allocate $3.416 million and the Wolverines allocate $2.805 million. Nebraska and Wisconsin make the biggest moves in the league for 2013, as the Huskers rise from sixth to third and the Badgers rise from seventh to fourth.

Illinois, which replaced five assistants from the 2012 team, including co-offensive coordinators Chris Beatty and Billy Gonzales, dropped from third in staff pay ($2.314 million) to eighth ($2.065 million).

The database shows that nearly every Big Ten assistant with "coordinator" in his title -- whether he's the sole coordinator or a co-coordinator -- will earn north of $300,000 for 2013. Only 18 assistants listed will make less than $200,000 in 2013 -- 15 work for Minnesota, Illinois, Purdue and Indiana.


Some notes:

  • Although Wisconsin paid former offensive coordinator Paul Chryst good coin, the school has increased its commitment for Gary Andersen's staff, not only with the coordinators but with some coveted position coaches like running backs coach Thomas Hammock ($300,000).
  • All of Nebraska's assistants are earning $200,000 or more for 2013, but there's a huge drop-off between Beck and the next highest-paid assistant (defensive coordinator John Papuchis at $310,000).
  • Michigan State has a similar drop off between Narduzzi and co-offensive coordinators Dave Warner ($270,000) and Jim Bollman ($260,000). Warner will be the primary offensive play-caller and has been on Mark Dantonio's staff since 2006, while Bollman is a newcomer.
  • Although Michigan is paying top dollar for its coordinators, the school gets its assistants for a relative bargain. Receivers coach/recruiting coordinator Jeff Hecklinski will earn $225,000 in 2013, while the others all will earn $205,000. Ohio State, meanwhile, pays all but one of its assistants $286,000 or more.
  • The Big Ten's three lowest-paid assistants all are in their first years: Illinois wide receivers coach Mike Bellamy ($125,000) and Purdue linebackers coach Marcus Freeman and running backs coach Jafar Williams (both at $120,000).
  • Although schools like Illinois, Wisconsin and Iowa ($325,000) pay their coordinators the exact same amount, others have slight differences in salary. Purdue's Shoop makes $5,000 more than defensive coordinator Greg Hudson. Minnesota defensive coordinator Tracy Claeys ($340,000) makes $5,000 more than offensive coordinator Matt Limegrover. Wonder if that leads to any underlying jealousy?
  • Most Big Ten schools have assistant salaries in round numbers, but there are some interesting totals from Indiana, which pays co-offensive coordinators Seth Littrell and Kevin Johns $255,500.04 and new recruiting coordinator/assistant defensive line coach James Patton $173,740.08. Never know when that change can come in handy.

The Big Ten still lacks some of the OMG totals seen in the SEC -- LSU is paying new offensive coordinator Cam Cameron $3.4 million in the next three years -- but the overall trend puts the league more on par with what we're seeing nationally.

Big Ten's best assistants in 2012

December, 12, 2012
12/12/12
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Head coaches are like quarterbacks. They get too much credit and too much blame.

Assistant coaches are like nose tackles. They don't get nearly enough credit despite playing vital roles.

Today, we'll change it up and give some recognition to Big Ten assistant coaches who did exemplary jobs with their position groups or, in some cases, units in 2012. Each of these coaches fostered improvement this season. Some took units in bad shape and made them better. Others took units in decent shape and made them very good. Some entered the season with skeptics and quieted them.

We came up with 13 assistants who deserve recognition. Yes, we realize we're leaving out some quality folks, but we had to cap it somewhere and wanted to spread the love around to the different teams.

Here's the rundown in alphabetical order:

Chris Ash, Wisconsin, defensive coordinator/secondary: All the attention on the offense's turbulent season took the spotlight away from the good things happening on the defensive side. Wisconsin finished in the top 25 nationally in total defense, scoring defense, rushing defense and pass efficiency defense. The Badgers held nine opponents to 21 points or fewer and gave an inconsistent offense chances to win every time out. Ash will be missed as he joins ex-Wisconsin coach Bret Bielema at Arkansas.

[+] EnlargeTim Beck, Bo Pelini
AP Photo/Nati Harnik, FileTim Beck, right, coordinated Nebraska's Big Ten-leading offense for head coach Bo Pelini.
Tim Beck, Nebraska, offensive coordinator/quarterbacks: The second-year play caller oversaw the Big Ten's top offense, which averaged 462.2 yards per game (24th nationally) and 35.1 points per game (28th nationally). Junior quarterback Taylor Martinez made significant strides under Beck's watch, and Nebraska survived the loss of star running back Rex Burkhead for most of the season thanks to contributions from Ameer Abdullah and others.

Tracy Claeys, Minnesota, defensive coordinator: An improved defense sparked Minnesota to a 4-0 start and eventually to bowl eligibility for the first time since the 2009 season. The Gophers pass rush showed life for the first time in years as senior end D.L. Wilhite and others put pressure on opposing quarterbacks. Minnesota was especially good against the pass, ranking 11th nationally and 20th in pass defense efficiency. Although the offense remains a work in progress, Minnesota should be pleased with the direction on defense under Claeys.

Adam Cushing, Northwestern, offensive line: Cushing's recruiting ability always has stood out, but his coaching skills had been questioned as Northwestern struggled to convert promising line prospects into powerful blockers. The Wildcats went from a finesse offense to a power offense this season, blasting off of the line to the tune of 230.9 rush yards per game. Red zone offense went from a weakness to a strength as Northwestern tied for 17th nationally. Cushing's line paved the way for star running back Venric Mark.

Rich Fisher, Nebraska, wide receivers: Nebraska isn't known for its wide receiver play, but things are changing under Fisher's watch. Led by standout sophomore Kenny Bell, the Huskers' top three receivers combined for 1,657 yards and 11 touchdowns on 115 receptions. Just as important, the receiving corps helped Nebraska's bread-and-butter run game with effective blocking throughout the season. Fisher's hiring after the 2010 season raised some eyebrows, as he had taken a break from college coaching, returned to the high school ranks and also served as a golf instructor in Massachusetts. But he definitely looks like a great addition to Bo Pelini's staff.

Patrick Higgins, Purdue, wide receivers: Higgins played a significant role in Purdue's late-season surge, as he took over the offensive play-calling duties after coordinator Gary Nord suffered a severe back injury. Purdue won its final three games with Higgins and head coach Danny Hope handling the play calls. Higgins also did a nice job with Purdue's wide receiving corps, despite the fluctuating quarterback situation. Three veteran Boilers receivers eclipsed 40 catches and 300 receiving yards, and redshirt freshman Dolapo Macarthy showed promise.

Seth Littrell, Indiana, offensive coordinator/tight ends/fullbacks: Head coach Kevin Wilson brought in Littrell to boost Indiana's passing attack, and Littrell delivered despite losing starting quarterback Tre Roberson in Week 2. Indiana went from 80th nationally in pass offense to 19th, leading the Big Ten with 311.2 yards per game. With help from assistant offensive coordinator/quarterbacks coach Kevin Johns, Littrell managed the quarterback situation pretty well as both Cameron Coffman and Nate Sudfeld had success. Littrell will go largely unnoticed because of Indiana's low profile and 4-8 record, but he was one of the Big Ten's best coaching additions for 2012.

Curt Mallory, Michigan, secondary: Michigan's defensive line dominates the spotlight because that's where coordinator Greg Mattison and head coach Brady Hoke put their primary focus, but Mallory has done a really nice job with a secondary that struggled mightily under the previous regime. Despite losing promising cornerback Blake Countess to a torn ACL in the season opener, Michigan still finished second nationally (behind Nebraska) in pass defense (155.2 ypg allowed). Safety Jordan Kovacs has blossomed under Mallory's watch, and while the depth in the secondary isn't where it will be eventually, Mallory has managed things well.

[+] EnlargeBart MIller
Jeff Hanisch/USA TODAY SportsBart Miller went from grad assistant to coach of a Wisconsin O-line that pummeled its way to Pasadena.
Bart Miller, Wisconsin, offensive line: Miller began the season as a graduate assistant and moved into one of the team's top assistant roles in Week 3 after the surprising dismissal of veteran line coach Mike Markuson. Although Wisconsin's line didn't have its typical dominant performances every time out, Miller fostered obvious improvement and cohesion during the course of the season. The finished product showed up in the Big Ten championship game against Nebraska, as Wisconsin bullied the Huskers to the tune of 70 points, 539 rushing yards and eight rushing touchdowns.

Reese Morgan, Iowa, defensive line: Iowa didn't have much to cheer about in 2012, and some of the staff changes Kirk Ferentz made led to some growing pains. Morgan faced a significant challenge in moving from offensive line to defensive line, which returned only a handful of players who had logged field time in 2011. Given the youth and inexperience along the Hawkeyes' defensive front, Morgan did a nice job in Year 1. Joe Gaglione had a nice senior season (9 tackles for loss, 5 sacks, 2 forced fumbles) and young players like Louis Trinca-Pasat showed promise. The line held its own in the first half of the season before struggling late.

Pat Narduzzi, Michigan State, defensive coordinator: Many of these assistants took questionable units and improved them. Narduzzi led an elite defense that entered the season with high expectations and met them. Make no mistake: Michigan State's defense is the only reason the team found itself in every game this season. The Spartans had a few standouts, namely linebacker Max Bullough, but their overall team defense and stinginess stood out. Narduzzi is one of the nation's premier coordinators and should land a head-coaching job in the near future.

John Strollo, Penn State, tight ends: Although O'Brien's offense is a tight end's dream, Strollo did a terrific job of developing young and unproven players this season. Redshirt freshman Kyle Carter emerged into one of the Nittany Lions' top passing threats, and junior Matt Lehman and true freshman Jesse James also stepped up at times. Of Penn State's top five receiving-yards leaders this season, three players are tight ends (Carter, Lehman and James).

Ed Warinner, Ohio State, offensive line/co-offensive coordinator: Warinner took an underachieving Buckeyes offensive line with serious depth questions and turned it into quite possibly the best line in the league. The Buckeyes' front five turned a corner in Big Ten play and created lanes for Braxton Miller, Carlos Hyde and the Big Ten's top scoring offense. Warinner was the Big Ten's best assistant hire of the last offseason and earns our vote as the league's top assistant in 2012.
Here's the second part of my conversation with Indiana coach Kevin Wilson. You can read Part I here.

What is your plan for the the quarterback situation? Do you expect to name a starter early in camp, or closer to the opener?


[+] EnlargeKevin Wilson
AP Photo/Darron CummingsNew Indiana coach Kevin Wilson is excited about some of the players his staff inherits.
Kevin Wilson: Performance will dictate that. We don't need a revolving door where we just keep trying guys, or guys feel like as soon they make a bad play they're out. If we do make a decision and go with one guy, you want that guy to have self-confidence and know if he does go out and is a little off one day, he won't be looking over his shoulder the whole time. We've got to wait and see how they perform. We did go through spring with four guys getting a bunch of reps. We will add freshman Tre Roberson into the mix and see where he is. He was Mr. Football in Indiana, though it's a tough position to walk in as a freshman.

We've got to be careful in not trying to be so fair in our evaluation that we don't develop the right guys. So there has to be a point in time where, whether we name a starter or not, that we do pare it down and get a direction, so the guys who are going to be playing get the bulk of the practice reps and keep honing in and improving their game.

The position that really seems to stand out on your roster is receiver. Damarlo Belcher was just named to the Biletnikoff Award watch list, for example. How good do you feel about that group?


KW: I really like them. They were learning in the spring to go hard every day and play up to their potential. I actually think they're more talented than maybe they've played. They're comparable to a lot of the kids I had at Oklahoma. And the tight ends group complements them very well. So the quarterbacks will have some good skill kids around them. If we take care of the ball and get some consistent line play, we should be a team that has a chance offensively to score some points.

The receiver position, it's solid. It needs to be a strength of our team. I think we can go about five or six deep, and we'll throw a couple of freshmen in the mix that we're intrigued by. I thought in the spring, Kofi Hughes was really good in some scrimmages. He needs to be a better and more consistent practice player every day, but in the scrimmages he stuck out. Damarlo led the Big Ten in receptions last year. I really like Duwyce Wilson, a sophomore who's coming on strong. Jamonne Chester came on strong. Dre Muhammad is a slot kid who had a nice spring.

Then we have some freshmen we'll get in the mix. Shane Wynn is a small kid, but he's quick and fast. Cody Latimer is a big kid out of Dayton who might be the best athlete of the whole class. I think that group walks out there and is maybe one of the best groups on the team.

Obviously, the defense has been a sore spot for some time. What did you see from that side of the ball this spring, and how can it get better this summer?


KW: I didn't go back and study the past, but stats-wise and numbers-wise, it didn't look like we played great defense last year. I thought from where we started this spring to where we finished was good. I liked that there was some give and take between the offense and the defense -- there were some days in practice where the defense definitely had the edge. I'd actually like to see the defense pick it up and be a little bit more in control and steady every day.

I think we're going to be decent inside at defensive tackle, where we'll play four or five guys and maybe even a couple of freshmen. The defensive ends, I'd like to see those guys pick up their presence. Jeff Thomas and Leon Beckum are captain-type players for us at linebacker. We need a third 'backer to come through and some depth at 'backer. We might have to play some young guys there because we've got some second- and third-year guys who need to pick things up.

And in the back end, we need more consistent play. We need to start playing better. We made some changes in the scheme and structure of how we do things, so maybe that will hep. The bottom line is, you've got to be able to run, you've got to be able to tackle, you've got to be able to to cover, you've got to be able to make adjustments with checks. And you've got to mentally be a smart player.

We've got to play faster in the secondary. That doesn't mean just putting in a new player because his 40 time is faster. There are a lot of really good DBs who don't have great speed, but they're great technicians. Their knowledge is unbelievable, they've got great anticipation and they're great students.

Have you decided whether you will call plays this year?


KW: We'll go through the preseason and figure it out. I'm leery sometimes, because there's so much going on on the field, of what you can and can't do. We've got enough going on now with getting up to speed in recruiting and getting some families relocated and some things around here with our facilities and dressing up our building. We'll have to sit down and iron some things out.

But I was very comfortable in the spring. I did some of those things, and I had [assistant coaches] Kevin [Johns] and Rod [Smith] do some of those things. I think we'll collectively do it as a group, then in time determine maybe who makes the final call, whether it's myself or one of those guys, as the season approaches.

Lastly, you're opening at Lucas Oil Stadium this year, site of course of the Big Ten championship game. How does that help the program, and do you foresee more games there in the future?


KW: Well, it's Ball State's home game. For us, I'm not big on taking home games away from our place, just because of the fans and students and what it means economically. I am excited for our fan base that does travel from Iowa or Indianapolis or from the Northwest or Northeast corners of our state. And I do think it's kind of neat playing a game in a pro stadium. But I don't know if I would want to take a home game away from our campus.
After the 2010 season wrapped up, Damarlo Belcher had Indiana's video staff compile cutups of all his catches and drops from the previous 12 games.

The catches far outnumbered the drops. Belcher had 78 receptions last fall, tops among Big Ten players. He ranked 19th nationally in receptions per game (6.5) and finished fourth in the league in receiving yards per game (69.3 rpg). The 6-foot-5, 214-pound Belcher emerged as the most consistent pass-catcher on the league's top passing offense.

[+] EnlargeDamarlo Belcher
AP Photo/Darron CummingsDamarlo Belcher led the Big Ten in receptions last fall, but is motivated by his drop against Iowa.
Belcher reviewed every play, but he spent more time on the drops. Specifically, he watched The Drop.

Indiana fans don't need further explanation. Anyone who watched the end of the Hoosiers' Nov. 6 game against then-No. 15 Iowa understands.

After Iowa scored a late touchdown to take an 18-13 lead, Indiana responded with a drive to the Hawkeyes' 18-yard line. After three incompletions, quarterback Ben Chappell lofted a pass to the end zone on fourth-and-10. Belcher leaped above the defenders to grab it for the game-winner.

But the ball bounced off of his hands. Iowa ran out the clock, and another chance for Indiana to turn a corner had disappeared.

Belcher hasn't forgotten what happened that day.

“I can't," he said. "But it won't happen again, I'll tell you that. That’s the one I watch the most."

Belcher felt understandably sick after the drop, but his coaches and teammates rallied around him. Indiana's leadership council unanimously voted him a game captain the next week against Wisconsin.

Belcher finished the season with an eight-catch, 83-yard performance as Indiana knocked off Purdue in overtime to reclaim the Old Oaken Bucket. But Indiana fell a win shy of bowl eligibility, and the school fired coach Bill Lynch the day after the Bucket game.

The Drop has lingered in Belcher's mind throughout the winter and spring.

"I think about it every day," he said. "Whenever I'm in the weight room or out at practice, I think about it. It gives me an extra effort or motivation to just go hard."

Belcher will be Indiana's clear-cut No. 1 receiver this fall after teammate Tandon Doss declared early for the NFL draft. Belcher also considered bolting after the coaching change.

Indiana's hiring of offensive guru Kevin Wilson helped keep Belcher in Bloomington.

"That was a big part of the reason why I stayed," Belcher said. "Coming from where he came from, I couldn't do anything but stay."

Wilson has talked to Belcher about former Oklahoma star tight end Jermaine Gresham and other standout pass-catchers he coached in Norman. Belcher has responded well to the new staff this spring.

"He's the oldest guy in the group, the most experienced, and he's been great to work with," co-offensive coordinator/receivers coach Kevin Johns said. "For someone who led the Big Ten in receptions, who made All-Big Ten recognition, he's very hungry to learn. He comes into meetings with wide eyes, not a guy who feels, 'I already know everything.'"

Belcher's hunger stems in part from the drop against Iowa. He can't wait for the season and a chance for redemption.

"If it can be close, man, I want it, I want the ball in my hands," he said. "That's how much it affected me. Whenever it's crunch time, I'll be ready."
Kevin Wilson hasn't recorded his first victory as Indiana coach, but he's putting together a winning staff.

Wilson on Thursday announced the additions of three more assistants, including two from the staff of recently fired Michigan coach Rich Rodriguez. Rod Smith and Greg Frey, who worked under Rodriguez at Michigan, come to Indiana along with Jerry Montgomery.

Smith, who helped mold Denard Robinson into the 2010 Big Ten Offensive Player of the Year, will serve as co-offensive coordinator and quarterbacks coach. He'll share coordinator duties with receivers coach Kevin Johns.

Frey will coach Indiana's offensive line after doing a good job with Michigan's front this season.
“I’ve had previous relationships with Rod Smith and Greg Frey having built some of our past offenses with coach [Rich] Rodriguez and having continued to visit and study with those guys," Wilson said in a statement. "It is going to be a natural transition for both of them. They are well-versed in the no-huddle style and know how to coach it."

Montgomery, a former defensive tackle at Iowa who spent the past two seasons coaching at Wyoming, will work with Indiana's defensive tackles. Mark Hagen will work with the defensive ends and serve as special teams coordinator.

So here is Wilson's updated staff:

DEFENSE

Doug Mallory: Assistant Head Coach/Co-Defensive Coordinator/Safeties
Mike Ekeler: Co-Defensive Coordinator/Linebackers
Mark Hagen: Defensive Ends/Special Teams Coordinator
Jerry Montgomery: Defensive Tackles
Corey Raymond: Cornerbacks

OFFENSE

Kevin Johns: Co-Offensive Coordinator/Wide Receivers
Rod Smith: Co-Offensive Coordinator/Quarterbacks
Greg Frey: Offensive Line

Wilson's ninth and final assistant -- still to be hired -- will coach running backs and serve as recruiting coordinator.

It'll be interesting to see how Smith's hiring impacts where Indiana goes with its next quarterback. Edward Wright-Baker seems a little closer to the Denard Robinson mold, but Wilson's offenses at Oklahoma also featured more traditional quarterbacks.
It's finally official. Indiana's new offensive coordinator is heading back to his old team.

Boise State just announced that Brent Pease will return to the school and receive a promotion to offensive coordinator. Pease had previously worked with Boise State's receivers before leaving to become Indiana's offensive coordinator.

But when Texas hired Boise State offensive coordinator Bryan Harsin to the same position days ago, Pease saw an opportunity to return. He wouldn't have left Boise had he known Harsin would leave his post.
"I’m very honored and fortunate to be able to return to Boise State," Pease said in a statement released by Boise State. "While I was very much looking forward to the opportunity at Indiana, the knowledge and relationships I have with the players, coaches and administration at Boise State made it a very logical choice for me and my family."

Two things jump out to me about how much college football has changed in recent years.

1. Pease left a Big Ten team for the same job with a soon-to-be Mountain West squad

2. It's hard to fault him for doing so

Not a knock against Indiana, but Boise State is one of the nation's premier programs and Pease has familiarity there. Head coach Chris Petersen will return, and Pease gets to oversee a dynamic offense and coach a Heisman Trophy candidate in quarterback Kellen Moore.

This certainly is disappointing for Indiana and new coach Kevin Wilson, who is compiling an outstanding staff of assistants. Wilson recently brought in Kevin Johns from Northwestern to coach receivers and serve as pass game coordinator, but he has some money to spend and will look for an offensive coordinator.

It'll be interesting to see Wilson's next move.

My biggest disappointment is not seeing Pease sport this headgear on the Hoosiers sideline this fall.
The good news: Indiana has hired an outstanding receivers coach in Kevin Johns, who moves to IU from Northwestern.

[+] EnlargeTandon Doss
AP Photo/Darron CummingsIndiana receiver Tandon Doss will bypass his senior year to enter the 2011 NFL draft.
The not-so-good-but-not-shocking news: Johns won't get to coach Tandon Doss with the Hoosiers.

Doss is declaring for the NFL draft and will bypass his senior season with the Hoosiers.

After earning back-to-back first-team All-Big Ten honors, Doss received a strong evaluation from the draft advisory board and saw the move as an opportunity to help his family. He also had some concerns about playing in a new system at IU.

Doss' departure doesn't come as a major surprise. He led the Big Ten and ranked fourth nationally in all-purpose yards (175.8 ypg), while ranking second in the Big Ten in receptions. An outstanding return man and receiver, Doss has all the ingredients to do big things at the next level.
"While my experience at Indiana was great, my decision came down to the fact that I could not pass up the opportunity to start my professional career," Doss said in a prepared statement. "Entering the NFL Draft was the best decision for myself, and most importantly, my family. My experience at IU was great and helped lay the foundation for my future. I can assure you that I will work hard and represent Indiana University in a first-class manner. I would like to thank coach [Bill] Lynch, coach Billy Lynch, all my coaches, the training staff and the support staff. I also wish coach [Kevin] Wilson and his staff the best of luck. I know they will do a great job. Lastly, I want to thank all the Indiana fans for their support. I hope all of you will continue to follow me as I move on to the NFL.”

Northwestern has confirmed Johns' hiring by Indiana, which will be announced Tuesday.

Johns, who also will serve as Indiana's pass game coordinator alongside new offensive coordinator Brent Pease, did an outstanding job with the Wildcats' wideouts the last few years. He helped mold players like Zeke Markshausen and Jeremy Ebert into All-Big Ten receivers. He's ready to move into a bigger role and will get one at IU, which returns a good group of receivers led by Damarlo Belcher (as long as he stays for his senior year).

I've been impressed with Wilson's assistant hires so far. He's putting together a very solid staff with the Hoosiers.

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