NCF Nation: Matt Anderson

Summer Stock: TCU

May, 31, 2011
5/31/11
2:45
PM ET
Next up in the Summer Stock series from ESPN Insider is TCU. For three weeks, this series will break down teams that have generated the most buzz out of spring practice. So Horned Frogs fans should take note that TCU is buzzworthy.

But what does Tim Kavanagh think about the Horned Frogs' chances this season? Kavanagh discusses many of the same concerns I have gone over in this space -- the loss of 26 seniors, four of five offensive line starters and some of their most valuable players. But he also has reasons for hope:
  • The Football Outsiders' Program FEI rankings put TCU at No. 11 after the 2010 season, an indication the program has had success in the past and is poised for success in the future.
  • TCU benefits from the return of Ed Wesley in the running game.
  • There is much promise on defense with a loaded front, including sophomore Matt Anderson -- potentially the next in a line of dynamic defensive ends.

There are obvious questions, of course. The schedule is not easy, with road games at Baylor, SMU and Boise State. But Kavanagh ends with this:
If there's one thing that TCU's recent dominance has illuminated, it's that the Horned Frogs belong to the class of programs that are in the hunt to contend for titles every year -- not just in their league, but in the BCS picture.

So who knows? If the Horned Frogs can take down the Broncos on Nov. 12, they could be in a position to beat the BCS system a year before joining it.

Also of note: TCU is the only non-AQ that will be profiled in this series.
LOS ANGELES -- TCU free safety Tejay Johnson remembers a 6-foot-2 wide receiver showing up as a freshman, intent on becoming a star playmaker on offense. Johnson stunned the youngster by telling him his future: "You're going to be a safety."

Players who sign up with the Horned Frogs and coach Gary Patterson often learn that their high school position matters about as much as their astrological sign. That's one of the secrets to the program's sustained success. Patterson and his staff scour Texas for athletes first and figure out where to put them later.

"The one thing that we always look at is, can the young man run?'" defensive coordinator Dick Bumpas said. "And if he can, then that's a good basis to start for a lot of positions."

[+] EnlargeTejay Johnson
Dale Zanine/US PresswireTejay Johnson is the quarterback of a TCU defense made up players who have switched from other positions.
That philosophy is a big reason why the defense has consistently ranked as one of the nation's best, despite featuring mostly under-the-radar recruits. Patterson and his assistants have an uncanny ability to identify athletes and then teach them how to play defense, if necessary. Current NFL linebacker Stephen Hodge was converted from a high school quarterback to a safety for the Frogs. Last year's All-American defensive end, Jerry Hughes, starred at running back in high school.

Examples abound on this year's team as well. Safety Colin Jones was a prep running back. Starting cornerbacks Jason Teague and Greg McCoy were high school receivers. Defensive tackle Cory Grant came in as a tight end. Linebacker Tank Carder was known for being a former BMX world champion. Matt Anderson entered college as a safety and is now a backup defensive lineman.

"I honestly don't know how Coach P does that," senior defensive end Wayne Daniels said. "I don't think I've ever seen him miss with a position change."

Everything's bigger in Texas? It's more like everything's faster in Fort Worth. Patterson will gladly sacrifice a few inches of height and 20 or more pounds per player in exchange for speed. His 4-2-5 defense is by definition built on swiftness over bulk, with three safeties and one fewer linebacker on the field than the normal 4-3 alignment.

Some of the reason for playing a 4-2-5 is by necessity, Bumpas said. There are more cornerbacks and safeties out there than big guys who can play linebacker, and even in the talent-rich state of Texas, TCU often has to comb through the prospects that Texas, Oklahoma and Texas A&M don't want. Those schools usually want the big guys.

"We really look for potential, probably more so than a finished product," Bumpas said.

The 4-2-5 is a perfect base defense against spread offenses, as the Horned Frogs are basically in nickel all of the time. Of course, that might not be an advantage in Saturday's Rose Bowl Game presented by Vizio; Wisconsin's powerful attack is about as far away from a spread as you can find.

The keys to the 4-2-5 include flexibility and individual responsibility. TCU can put two safeties on one side of the field, bring one or two down for help against the run or send them on blitzes. The defensive front does a lot of shifting, and the pass coverage is divided into two halves of the field. Free safety Johnson is the quarterback of the defense, and weak safety Alex Ibiloye will make calls for coverage on his side.

"Free safety is definitely the hardest position," Carder said. "Coach Patterson gives us three or four different calls, and we've got to choose which one it is. We have a lot of responsibility to make the right calls, but they teach us well and line us up in the right spots."

At the end of each week, Patterson tests each defensive player on their assignments and coverages. He'll show a play on a video screen, pause it, then force each guy to show with a laser pointer exactly what his responsibility is in that situation.

"It's pretty intense," Jones said. "You get some instant feedback, and it's usually pretty negative if you mess up."

The Horned Frogs don't seem to mess up too much on Saturdays. Their defense has led the nation in yards allowed for the past three years and ranks No. 1 this year in points surrendered at just 11.4 per game. It's a senior-laden group that knows this system intimately.

"Structurally, they're a little bit different than what we see," Wisconsin offensive coordinator Paul Chryst said. "But what makes it different is how they play it. They play it really well, not just this year but for many years. They've got athletes that can move, they also know where they're going and what they're doing, so they don't play with hesitation."

Some incoming TCU players, like that freshman wide receiver, might hesitate at switching to a new position. But Johnson said that like most, the freshman quickly realized it was his best chance to get on the field and contribute.

At this point, why would anyone question TCU's winning formula?

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