NCF Nation: Rashaad Reynolds

Pac-12 all-bowl team

January, 9, 2014
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Who were the Pac-12 standouts this bowl season? Here are our picks.

OFFENSE

[+] EnlargeBrett Hundley
Andrew Weber/USA TODAY SportsBrett Hundley finished the season with a strong performance in the Bruins' bowl win.
QB Brett Hundley, UCLA: Hundley accounted for four touchdowns in the Bruins' 42-12 win over Virginia Tech in the Sun Bowl. He rushed for 161 yards on 10 carries -- 16.1 yards per run -- with two touchdowns and he also completed 16 of 29 passes for 226 yards and two scores. Other QBs had nice games, but Hundley put up big numbers against an outstanding defense.

RB Ka'Deem Carey, Arizona: In the AdvoCare V100 Bowl win over Boston College, Carey rushed for 169 yards on 27 carries and two scores, averaging 6.3 yards per rush. He decisively outplayed Boston College RB Andre Williams, who won the Doak Walker Award and was a Heisman Trophy finalist.

RB D.J. Foster, Arizona State: Despite being banged up, Foster rushed for 132 yards on 20 carries -- 6.6 yards per carry -- in the Sun Devils' 37-23 loss to Texas Tech in the Holiday Bowl. He also caught five passes for 23 yards.

WR Marqise Lee, USC: In his career finale, Lee caught seven passes for 118 yards with two touchdowns in USC's win over Fresno State in the Las Vegas Bowl.

WR Nate Phillips, Arizona: Phillips, a true freshman, caught nine passes for 193 yards in the Wildcats' win over Boston College.

WR Josh Huff, Oregon: Huff caught five passes for 104 yards and a touchdown in Oregon's 30-7 win over Texas in the Valero Alamo Bowl.

OL Xavier Su'a-Filo, UCLA: Su'a-Filo led the Bruins' offensive line against a tough Virginia Tech defense. UCLA rushed for 197 yards against a top-10 rushing defense and yielded only two sacks.

OL Abe Markowitz, USC: The sixth-year walk-on stepped in at center for an injured Marcus Martin -- the Trojans' best offensive lineman this season -- and played well in the 45-20 win over Fresno State. The Trojans yielded only one sack and rushed for 154 yards. He was named the "Offensive Outperformer of the Game" by his coaches.

OL Jake Fisher, Oregon: Fisher led a strong effort from the Ducks' offensive line in the win over Texas. Oregon rushed for 216 yards and yielded only two sacks. Fisher did a good job against Texas' top defender, end Jackson Jeffcoat.

OL Micah Hatchie, Washington: Hatchie, the Huskies' left tackle, was the biggest reason BYU didn't record a sack in the Fight Hunger Bowl, a 31-16 Huskies victory. Washington also rushed for 190 yards.

OL Isaac Seumalo, Oregon State: Seumalo led perhaps the Beavers O-line's best effort of the season. Oregon State rushed for 195 yards and yielded no sacks.

K Travis Coons, Washington: Coons made a 45-yard field goal against BYU -- the longest Pac-12 postseason field goal -- and was good on all four of his PATs.

DEFENSE

DL Scott Crichton, Oregon State: Crichton had three tackles for a loss, a sack, a forced fumble and pass breakup in the win over Boise State.

DL Taylor Hart, Oregon: Hart had a game-high 11 tackles, with half a sack and a forced fumble in the Ducks' win over Texas.

DL Hau'oli Kikaha, Washington: Kikaha had nine tackles with three sacks and a forced fumble in the Huskies' win over BYU.

LB Shayne Skov, Stanford: Skov had nine tackles, three tackles for a loss, a sack and a forced fumble in Stanford's 24-20 loss to Michigan State in the Rose Bowl.

LB Jake Fischer, Arizona: Fischer had a game-high 14 tackles in the Wildcats' win over Boston College. He also had a sack and 1.5 tackles for a loss. Arizona held Williams to only 75 yards on 26 carries.

LB John Timu, Washington: Timu had a game-high 14 tackles, a sack and an interception in the Huskies' win over BYU.

LB Jabral Johnson, Oregon State: Johnson had a game-high 12 tackles, a sack and a quarterback hurry in the Beavers' win over Boise State.

DB Rashaad Reynolds, Oregon State: Reynolds had 10 tackles and returned two fumbles for touchdowns in the Beavers' win over Boise State. The fumble returns went for 70 and 3 yards.

DB Avery Patterson, Oregon: Patterson had nine tackles and returned an interception 37 yards for a touchdown in the win over Texas.

DB Josh Shaw, USC: Shaw held Fresno State receiver Davante Adams to nine receptions for 73 yards in the Trojans' win over the Bulldogs. He finished with six tackles and had an interception in the end zone.

DB Anthony Jefferson, UCLA: Jefferson had seven tackles, shared a tackle for a loss and had a pass breakup in the Bruins' win over Virginia Tech. The Hokies completed only 15 of 36 throws for 176 yards.

P Ben Rhyne, Stanford: With five punts, Rhyne averaged 49.8 yards per boot in the Rose Bowl.
Here's our take on Oregon State's win over Boise State in the Sheraton Hawaii Bowl.

It was over when: It never really got started. Oregon State dominated on both sides of the ball from bell to bell. When Oregon State went up 38-6 with eight minutes left in the third quarter, sportswriters everywhere started typing (cough, cough).

Game ball goes to: The Beavers as a whole. There really wasn't a standout player in this win -- well, other than Oregon State CB Rashaad Reynolds (see below) -- but what was notable was a team that had lost five in a row playing perhaps its most complete game of the season. While it has been a tough year for Mike Riley, the bowl performance clearly suggests he has not lost his locker room.

Key stat: Oregon State, a team that struggled to run the ball and stop the run all season, averaged 5.9 yards per carry while the Broncos averaged 4.1 yards per carry. That reveals how the Beavers owned the line of scrimmage on both sides of the ball. Oregon State rushed for 195 yards, Boise State 155.

Unsung hero: Reynolds returned fumbles 3 and 70 yards for touchdowns in the first half as the Beavers took charge of the game. Not sure if that qualifies as "unsung," but it was a pretty efficient way to make life easy for the Beavers.

What it means for Oregon State: It means Riley and Oregon State end 2013 with a winning record and a bowl win, as well as a team that sets up well for 2014. The Pac-12 North again won't be easy next fall, but what's coming back next August in Corvallis -- even without early NFL entries Brandin Cooks and Scott Crichton -- looks stronger than what came back last August.

What it means for Boise State: While Boise State fans will fret the first post-Chris Petersen performance, this bowl game doesn't mean much for the program. Sure, plenty of folks will be skeptical whether the Broncos can continue to be nationally relevant. But it's up to new coach Bryan Harsin and the Broncos as a whole to show the doubters it will be business as usual for the top non-AQ power. That can only happen next fall. And, by the way, the Broncos have a lot coming back.

To watch the trophy presentation of the Sheraton Hawaii Bowl, click here.

Oregon State picks up the pieces

September, 4, 2013
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After he sliced and diced Oregon State's defense last Saturday, Eastern Washington quarterback Vernon Adams recalled his team's dispiriting conclusion to an otherwise good 2012 season. Just like the Beavers, the Eagles had seen their strong campaign a year ago end on a down note against a team from Texas.

The Eagles lost to Sam Houston State in the FCS semifinals, a massive comeback from a 35-0 halftime deficit falling just short, 45-42. The Beavers self-immolated in the fourth quarter and lost to Texas in the Alamo Bowl, 31-27.

Sort of a vast distance betwixt the two, eh?

[+] EnlargeVernon Adams
Jaime Valdez/USA TODAY SportsThe Oregon State defense yielded big numbers in the loss to Eastern Washington.
So Eastern Washington, after beating the then 25th-ranked Beavers 49-46, moves on to the Big Sky Conference -- Cal Poly, Weber State, UC Davis -- with big intentions in the FCS playoffs, while Oregon State … well, does what?

Serves as a national punch line? Suffers through another season like 2011, when a loss to another FCS team -- Sacramento State -- presaged a horrid 3-9 campaign that had folks calling for coach Mike Riley's head?

Or Oregon State rights itself and redeems its season, transforming the inglorious opener into a fluke, a tough lesson that can be later referenced after a bowl victory as the touchstone for ultimate and satisfying success.

"[Cornerback] Rashaad Reynolds said something great in the locker room," quarterback Sean Mannion told reporters after the defeat. "He said that there are two ways that we can go about this: We can either lay down or stand up and overcome this by working harder than we ever have. Obviously, that is the route that we are going to take.”

Of course, that's also pretty obvious. The same thing was said after the Sacramento State loss, though it's worth noting the Beavers were riven after that game by the QB switch from the popular Ryan Katz to Mannion, then a redshirt freshman.

Still, the perception of Oregon State has taken a hit. Again. The preseason take on the Beavers was they were headed for a 7-0 start and potential top-10 ranking that would make the Oct. 26 visit from Stanford a red-letter date nationally. Now the visit from woeful Hawaii on Saturday doesn't feel like a sure thing.

Oregon State welcomed back seven starters from one of the nation's best defenses in 2012, yet it yielded ludicrous numbers against the Eagles -- 625 total yards, 8.8 yards per play, 31 first downs, 448 passing yards, etc. The big preseason question for the Beavers was the quarterback competition between Mannion and Cody Vaz, but Mannion was lights-out and the offense rolled up 46 points, which would have been enough to win every game the team played since 2006, other than matchups with Oregon in 2008, 2011 and 2012.

Think of all the great offenses Oregon State has faced over the past few years. Yet when the Beavers gave up 29 first-half points, it was the most they'd yielded since 2008 against Oregon. The Eagles’ 23 second-quarter points were the most the Beavers have surrendered in any quarter since UCLA scored 28 in the fourth on Sept. 29, 2007.

No matter how dynamic Adams was, this probably ranks as one of Oregon State's worst defensive performances of the modern era, particularly when you factor in that the foe was from a lower division.

So what was the problem?

"We got totally disrupted," Riley said. "We were way out of sorts in pass rush, pass-rush lanes, we were misaligned defensively. We made some crucial technical errors, just playing Cover 3 and giving up a deep ball right down the middle of the field. Just kind of simple football mistakes, whether it's just lining up or maintaining a pass-rush lane or maintaining position on a receiver."

Throw in poor tackling and that just about covers it. The defensive failure was a total team effort. All-Pac-12 defensive end Scott Crichton was invisible, recording just two tackles.

"The quarterback gave us fits," Riley said. "Scott could never quite get there or finish a play."

The Beavers were the only ranked team to lose to an FCS foe on the opening weekend, but they certainly weren't the only AQ conference team to get toppled. Kansas State, the defending Big 12 champions, lost to North Dakota State. Folks aren't going to start questioning Bill Snyder's coaching acumen, at least not anyone with a brain.

Stuff happens.

The question now is whether this is just one of those games -- an anomaly -- where things go haywire. The answer to that only will be revealed in coming weeks. But know that the visit to Utah in Week 3 suddenly seems freighted with far more meaning than in the preseason.

Not that the Beavers should be overlooking anyone at this point.

"I think everybody takes it on themselves, coaches, players," Riley said. "Everybody has to take responsibility."

Pac-12 media day primer

July, 12, 2013
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Two weeks and counting. Ted and I are gearing up for media day. Are you? Here's what you should know.

When: July 26

Where: Sony Studios, Los Angeles

Who will be there (all times PT):
UPDATE: Arizona State informed me Friday morning that it has decided to bring Will Sutton instead of safety Alden Darby. This is a good thing because Sutton was the league's defensive player of the year last season, and his presence helps bolster his name -- and the program -- in the eyes of the national media.

Who won’t be there: The biggest name missing is Arizona running back Ka'Deem Carey, who led the nation in rushing last season. Coaches tend to bring veterans and guys with experience. Yankey is a great spokesman for Stanford and a good candidate, but I know others wouldn't mind hearing some thoughts from Cardinal QB Kevin Hogan.

Five storylines:
  1. Hitting? Scott is expected to announce the league's health and safety initiative, which will limit how much hitting can be done in practice. This isn't a new concept, but the league jumped in front of it by being the first to make a conference-wide mandate.
  2. Bowl updates? We know the status of the Rose, Alamo, Holiday, Kraft Fight Hunger and Sun bowls. Not sure if the rest of the lineup for beyond this season will be announced at media day. But one of us will ask.
  3. New coaches: This is the meet-the-world opportunity for the new head coaches in the league: Dykes, MacIntyre and Helfrich. Expect the requisite questions on the difficulty of changing cultures and rebuilding programs.
  4. Preseason poll: Is there any fodder better than preseason polls? Oregon or Stanford? Stanford or Oregon? ASU, UCLA or USC? Your Pac-12 bloggers will be submitting their ballots this weekend after a visit to the Oracle of Delphi, a seance channeling Nostradamus and a dartboard.
  5. Quirky questions: With the access of media day comes the spectacle of media day. Granted, it's not as bad as some of the quirks at Super Bowl media day. But there's bound to be a couple of left-field questions -- and they'll probably be directed at Leach, who is great and usually has fun with them. Last year he was asked which Pac-12 coach he'd go hunting with and which Civil War generals he'd compare some of his players to.

Ted and I will be trying something new this year (we think). Instead of the on-the-stage posts, we'll be doing a live chat during the entire stage session and bringing you info real time. So take note of the times (in Pacific, to save you the math) and be ready to interact.
We've looked at offensive three-headed monsters -- elite combinations of quarterback, running back and receiver -- so now let's look at the defensive version.

That would be elite combinations of top tacklers, top sack men and top interceptors, as tackles, sacks and interceptions make defensive coordinators happy.

The combinations here might be stronger even than the offensive troikas. Stanford, for example, welcomes back an elite, All-America sort of player for each category. It seems to us all 12 teams have at least one player to be excited about heading into the fall.

Just two teams -- Arizona State and Utah -- only hit on one category. Arizona, Colorado and Washington join Stanford hitting all three, though Colorado's interception numbers from 2012 are so meager -- 3! -- that it's not terribly relevant. And USC's just missing was a matter of 0.4 tackles per game.

So here's how we see things stacking up.

And, again, you should feel free to be outraged by our lunkheaded bias against your team, which obviously should be ranked much higher.

1. Stanford
LB Shayne Skov, OLB Trent Murphy, S Ed Reynolds

The skinny: Three potential All-Americans. There is no finer troika in the nation. Not sure if anyone else is even close.

2. USC
LB Hayes Pullard, OLB Morgan Breslin, S Dion Bailey

The skinny: Pullard was seventh in the conference with 8.2 tackles per game, just behind safety T.J. McDonald. Breslin is transitioning from defensive end to outside linebacker, which actually seems like a better fit. And Bailey, who led the Trojans with four interceptions, is moving back to safety from linebacker.

3. UCLA
LB Eric Kendricks, OLB Anthony Barr, S Randall Goforth

The skinny: UCLA gets here on the power of the first two, an elite combination, with Barr a likely top-10 NFL draft pick next spring. That balances out the questions in the secondary. Goforth, a promising player, just seemed like as good a choice as any.

4. Oregon State
LB Michael Doctor, DE Scott Cricthon, CB Rashaad Reynolds

The skinny: Doctor took a big step forward last year, even if D.J. Alexander is a flashier player. Crichton, first-team All-Pac-12 in 2012, is trying to lead the Beavers in sacks for a third consecutive year. Reynolds had three picks last year and now becomes the Beavers' lead cornerback with Jordan Poyer off to the NFL.

5. Oregon
LB Derrick Malone, DE Taylor Hart, S Erick Dargan

The skinny: Malone was just thrown in there because the Ducks' linebacker situation is cloudy. Hart is a budding all-conference guy who should get his due this fall. Dargan led the Ducks with five picks, but there's an acknowledgement here also of cornerback Ekpre-Olomu, a preseason All-American, who had four.

6. Arizona State
LB Chris Young, DT Will Sutton, S Alden Darby

The skinny: Sutton is the big fish here, obviously. Linebacker is a question for the Sun Devils, who lost their top two tacklers. Young and Darby are returning starters, though, with Young ranking third in tackles and Darby second in interceptions in 2012.

7. Washington
LB John Timu, OLB Josh Shirley, CB Marcus Peters

The skinny: This is a solid but unspectacular trio, as none of the three were all-conference. But the Huskies defense, which was greatly improved in 2012, has a lot of production back. It's worth noting that defensive end Andrew Hudson tied Shirely for the team lead with 6.5 sacks, and linebacker Shaq Thompson also had three picks, like Peters.

8. Arizona
LB Jake Fischer, LB Marquis Flowers, CB Jonathan McKnight

The skinny: All three leaders are back, but they get marked down for the overall defensive numbers in 2012. Flowers, an underrated player, had 5.5 sacks and was tied with McKnight with three interceptions.

9. California
LB Nick Forbes, DE Chris McCain, S Michael Lowe

The skinny: Forbes averaged 7.1 tackles per game last year. McCain tied for the team lead in sacks with 3.5, but don't be surprised if Todd Barr or Brennan Scarlett lead the pass rush. Lowe had three picks last year to tie for the team lead, but he's listed behind Alex Logan on the post-spring depth chart.

10. Washington State
S Deone Bucannon, OLB Logan Mayes, LB Cyrus Coen

The skinny: Bucannon is an A-list guy, earning second-team All-Pac-12 honors in 2012. He led the Cougars in tackles and interceptions, so we included Coen, who was second with three picks. The gigantic void is the pass rush, which lost four-year sack leader Travis Long.

11. Utah
LB/S Brian Blechen, DE Trevor Reilly, S Eric Rowe

The skinny: These are three solid players, but there's a lot of uncertainty on the Utes defense. The Utes lost their top two sack men and their top three cornerbacks. Blechen has bounced back and forth between linebacker and safety, and neither Reilly nor Rowe were able to top the depth chart at his position this spring without an "Or" beside him.

12. Colorado
LB Derrick Webb, DE Chidera Uzo-Diribe, CB Kenneth Crawley

The skinny: All three leaders are back, but we're listing the promising Crawley instead of the two guys who had a single pick last year. Uzo-Diribe is legit. He has 12.5 sacks over the past two seasons, including seven last year. Big issue here, however, is how terrible the Buffs defense was last year.
While so much of the attention on Oregon State this spring has been on the quarterback competition -- one of the most intriguing in the nation between Sean Mannion and Cody Vaz -- there are other critical position battles.

And the one at cornerback might even be of greater importance.

Post spring, Sean Martin sits atop the depth chart at left corner, opposite returning starter Rashaad Reynolds on the right side. This position is of great interest because it was formerly held by the departed Jordan Poyer -- one of the school's top secondary players of all-time who sits fourth on the school's career interceptions list with 13.

[+] EnlargeMike Riley
AP Photo/Don Ryan"I'm not ready to say which one of them is going to come out of the fold as 'the starter,'" Oregon State's Mike Riley said of cornerbacks Sean Martin and Steven Nelson.
Pushing Martin is junior college transfer Steven Nelson -- who was rated by one service as the No. 2 JC cornerback in the country.

But head coach Mike Riley isn't approaching it with the thought that one will be a starter and one will be a backup. If all goes according to plan -- it's likely we'll see them on the field at the same time.

"That competition is good for the Beavers because my goal out of this thing is that both of these guys become bona fide starters," Riley said. "They both won't necessarily start on first down, but if they proceed to grow as we've seen them through their competition in the spring, then you'll see them both playing together a lot. Third-down defenses, nickel or dime. We actually need both of them to be considered as starters."

He says that with the caveat that he's not ready to say which one has pulled ahead in their competition. Spring depth charts offer a little insight, but not nearly enough to pass judgment.

Once a commit to Georgia, Nelson comes to Oregon State from the College of Sequoias in California, and has spent the spring playing catch up. Martin, however, started three games last year -- twice as a nickel and one at corner against Arizona State when Poyer was out with an injury. After missing the majority of 2011 with a broken foot, Martin bounced back in 2012 to register 43 tackles, two interceptions and three pass breakups.

Martin's experience might be what keeps him atop the depth chart -- at least for now.

"I think Sean Martin has improved dramatically in the course of two years here and I think Steven has all the athletic tools to be a corner in our league and be a good player," Riley said. "He needs to learn more and more about what we do and how he fits into that, but I think he's very conscientious and I think he'll make that move. I think this has all been very good."

After a rough 2011, where the Beavers ranked 104th in pass-efficiency defense, they bounced back and were 20th nationally last year. After giving up 28 passing touchdowns in 2011, they cut that number in half to 14 in 2012. Poyer was a huge part of that, hauling in seven of OSU's 20 interceptions last season.

With Reynolds (25 career starts) on the other side and returning safeties Tyrequek Zimmerman (13 starts) and Ryan Murphy (15 starts), the secondary should again be solid with just the one hole to fill.

But Riley isn't as concerned with finding one guy who can step in for Poyer as he is developing them to work together in unison.

"I'm not ready to say which one of them is going to come out of the fold as 'the starter,'" Riley said. "But my goal is for both of them to be ready to play and be good, solid players in the fall."


TUCSON, Ariz. -- It was a barnburner -- again -- at Arizona Stadium. Here's how we saw things in Oregon State's 38-35 victory:

It was over when: Oregon State cornerback Rashaad Reynolds broke perfectly on a Matt Scott pass and grabbed an interception that ended Arizona's comeback hopes in the final minute.

Game ball goes to: Beavers quarterback Sean Mannion, who was 29 of 45 for a career-high 433 yards with three touchdowns and no interceptions.

Stat of the game: The teams combined for 1,157 yards -- 612 from Oregon State and 545 from Arizona.

Unsung hero of the game: While Storm Woods had a crucial fumble for Oregon State, he also rushed for 161 yards on 29 carries with a touchdown. The long-dormant Beavers running game is back.

Best call: On third-and-5 from the Wildcats' 9-yard line, Mannion found backup tight end Connor Hamlett for the decisive score with 1:09 left. The Beavers caught 29 passes tonight, but that was the only one Hamlett grabbed.

What it means: Oregon State now has three quality wins, two on the road. The Beavers should move up in the polls, into the top 15. This just further shows their legitimacy as a Pac-12 contender. Of course, rival Oregon did beat the Wildcats 49-0. As for Arizona, there was little to suggest this isn't a bowl team. They merely have lost to the Nos. 2 and 18 teams in the nation.

Injury woes at Oregon State

August, 24, 2011
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Oregon State and Arizona State seem to be battling to become the Pac-12's biggest MASH unit.

Most folks already know about the uncertainty of receiver James Rodgers (knee) and tight end Joe Halahuni (shoulder), who are doubtful to play at Wisconsin on Sept. 10. But there are a couple of other injuries worth following that are also critical.
  • On the "fairly good," side of the injured list is DT Kevin Frahm. He had surgery on Monday to repair a torn meniscus. The hope is he will return to practice in time to play at Wisconsin.
  • The news is not so good for cornerback Brandon Hardin and his shoulder. He'll need surgery to fix a fracture, and the procedure could end his season. At the minimum, he'll be out six weeks. Sophomore Rashaad Reynolds will step into a starting role.
  • Defensive tackle Dominic Glover still hasn't been cleared academically. What once seemed like a minor issue is taking longer than expected to resolve, which is reason to be nervous.
  • Things are cloudy at tight end until Halahuni comes back. Freshman Kellen Clute hurt his knee in the scrimmage, and two redshirt freshmen, Tyler Perry and Connor Hamlett, will be suspended for a game, though it's unclear which game at this point.
  • Also, linebacker Cameron Collins continues to be limited by an abominable issue. He had offseason surgery and has missed a lot of practice time.

Getting away from injuries, it appears that true freshman Malcolm Agnew is on the cusp of earning the starting spot at running back. The last true freshman to start at the position for the Beavers turned out OK, you might recall.

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