#AskLoogs: Factors in a college decision

August, 12, 2013
8/12/13
12:30
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Good question, and at the risk of sounding vague, I would say to some degree it is a combination of all of the above for most prospects. Former Michigan coach Lloyd Carr was quoted as saying, "If you commit to a school because of a coach, you are committing for the wrong reasons.” The reality is players often commit to a coach, but in the coaching profession, the likelihood that you will play for that coach during your four or five years is not very high. There needs to be substance to the decision with a well-rounded set of critical factors that you want athletically, socially and academically to make the most educated choice. In today’s world I’m afraid I would have to say the biggest factor is likely depth chart and early playing time, which I think is very, very dangerous because regardless of where a prospect signs, he’s going to have to compete. Nothing will be handed to him.

Coaches want players who don’t care who is on the roster or how many former five-stars are at his position. The ones who focus on this too much can give off red flags about their willingness to compete. More and more, the NFL seems to be playing a bigger role in the recruitment of players. Every player thinks he is going to the NFL, which can give schools like Miami, Alabama, LSU and USC, among others, a real advantage.

The bottom line is that different prospects make decisions for different reasons. Some are well thought out and some are very impulsive. It has been my experience that ones who make their decisions with the least amount of substance are the ones most at risk for fizzling out or transferring.

Do your homework and take your time.

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