Sharing thoughts on Nick Caserio interview

January, 24, 2014
Jan 24
1:00
PM ET
When the Indianapolis Colts requested permission to interview New England Patriots vice president of player personnel Nick Caserio for their general manager opening in January of 2012, Caserio didn't pursue the opportunity.

"I have a great job here in New England, I work with a great staff, privileged to work for the head coach that I do," Caserio said at the time. "Today is no different than it was any other day. ... I love New England. I enjoy being here. I enjoy the work that I do, the people that I work with. That's not going to change."

Two years later, has it changed?

That was the first question that came to mind after ESPN NFL Insider Adam Schefter tweeted today that Caserio was interviewing for the Miami Dolphins' general manager job.

In the end, I'd be surprised if Caserio accepted the job in Miami should it be offered to him.

The main reason is that his task would be to build a team to dethrone the division rival he's helped build in New England, which is led by the person who gave him his start in the NFL. Caserio seems like he's too loyal to Bill Belichick for that to happen, even if the financial reward was such that it was difficult to turn down.

So if that's the case, why even interview?

A few thoughts along those lines:

It gives him a chance to develop a connection with Dolphins owner Stephen Ross, similar to what Josh McDaniels just went through by interviewing with Browns owner Jimmy Haslam for Cleveland's head coaching job. Caserio and McDaniels have long careers ahead of them, and the chance to develop those connections is valuable.

Another benefit for Caserio is that it would smash the perception he wouldn't leave should another opportunity arise in the future. It also could help improve his current standing in New England.

Those are some initial thoughts on news that came as a surprise today.

Mike Reiss

ESPN New England Patriots reporter

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