Big Blue Morning: The undrafteds

May, 13, 2014
May 13
9:30
AM ET
The scramble in the wake of the NFL draft for the lists of undrafted free agents agreeing to terms with teams is an ugly one. The process is a mess, as players and teams will "agree" on terms only to break said "agreements" moments later for better offers. Players will tweet that they have signed with a team when in fact they're only getting a tryout. It's a wreck. So, as you may have noticed, I really don't get involved in putting names out there.

Monday afternoon, however, the New York Giants actually released the names of five undrafted free agents they signed. They are as follows:

Kelcy Quarles, DT, South Carolina
Eathyn Manumaleuna, DT, BYU
Kerry Wynn, DE, Richmond
Justin Anderson, LB, Louisiana-Lafayette
Thomas Gordon, S, Michigan

There are more to come, obviously, and the Giants will clear room accordingly. Monday, they waived linebacker Allen Bradford, cornerback Junior Mertile and punter Jordan Gay and terminated the contract of quarterback Rusty Smith, who signed just a couple of weeks ago when they were stocking up on quarterbacks in the wake of the Eli Manning and Curtis Painter surgeries.

As for this group of undrafteds, the biggest name is Quarles, who made our list of the top 10 undrafted players Saturday evening and seems to offer the size and the interior pass-rush ability the Giants look for in their defensive tackles. They currently project Johnathan Hankins and Cullen Jenkins as starters at that position with Mike Patterson, Markus Kuhn and third-round pick Jay Bromley as backups and members of the rotation. But defensive tackle is definitely a spot at which an undrafted player could work his way into practice reps this summer and possibly even playing time in the fall.

Every undrafted player who signs with the Giants gets to look firsthand at the example of star wide receiver Victor Cruz, who was himself undrafted, for inspiration.

Dan Graziano

ESPN New York Giants reporter

SPONSORED HEADLINES

Comments

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, photo & other personal information you make public on Facebook will appear with your comment, and may be used on ESPN's media platforms. Learn more.