How Ben McAdoo helps Eli Manning

June, 6, 2014
Jun 6
1:30
PM ET
Our man Mike Sando took a look at some of the most important coordinator changes Insider made around the NFL this offseason, and right there at No. 2 is Ben McAdoo to the New York Giants.

Basically, Mike surveyed a bunch of folks around the league to get their thoughts on what kind of impact the new coordinators would have in their new spots. And the prevailing opinion is that Giants quarterback Eli Manning will have no trouble adjusting to McAdoo's offense and that it will benefit him:
Learning the new offense isn't going to be a problem for Manning after a decade in the system Kevin Gilbride coordinated for the Giants previously. One head coach described Manning as "off-the-charts brilliant" and smarter than his brother. The fact that Manning has recovered from ankle surgery well enough to participate in OTAs is another bonus on the preparation front.

"McAdoo will give them different concepts in the passing game -- shorter passes to supplement the running game and more midrange routes to move the chains," a personnel evaluator familiar with McAdoo predicted.

There's more, but it's Insider, and we can't give all of that away. It has to encourage you, however, if you're a Giants fan, to think that the new offense will operate closer to the line of scrimmage and at lower overall risk than the old one did. Manning's interception total has to come down from last year's career-high and league-leading 27. And as Mike points out, there's little doubt that his pass protection can't be any worse than it was in 2013. So even if everything had stayed the same, you'd have predicted a return to more reasonable numbers for Manning. What will be interesting to see is how the Giants' relatively small receivers and relatively inexperienced backs and tight ends handle their responsibilities around Manning, who should be able to get them the ball very quickly in the new scheme.

Dan Graziano

ESPN New York Giants reporter

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