Giants' Eric Herman suspended 4 games

August, 8, 2014
Aug 8
3:30
PM ET
The NFL announced Friday that New York Giants offensive lineman Eric Herman has been suspended for the first four games of the 2014 season for violating its performance-enhancing drug policy.

Herman can continue to practice with the team and play in preseason games, but once the regular season begins he must stay away from the team until Friday, Sept. 26 -- the day after the Giants' Week 4 game at Washington. He will not be paid during the suspension.

As always seems to be the case with these NFL PED suspensions, Herman says he wasn't cheating and it was all some kind of clerical misunderstanding.

"The NFL requires a therapeutic use exemption (TUE) for permission to take certain medications," Herman said in a written statement released by the team. "I have a TUE for one medication, but not another stimulant that treats the same condition. Unfortunately, a stimulant for which I don’t have a TUE was in my body, and the rules are very strict, so I am taking responsibility and I sincerely apologize to my teammates, coaches and the club. This won’t happen again, and I will spend the four weeks working hard to be ready to return to work."

Whatever. Herman messed up and he got caught, and he's out for a quarter of the season. Feel bad for him if you want to, but do it without me, please. I do not share the football-crazed public's bottomless tolerance for players who fail drug tests.

Herman is a young player the Giants like, and he's been working hard in training camp as a backup guard and center, but his roster spot is no sure thing. If this costs him a spot on the team, then that's what he deserves. We're long past the time when it was worth it to hope that suspensions like these would stop players from using illegal performance-enhancing drugs. They don't, they won't, and I'm sure I'll be writing another post like this one again very soon.

Dan Graziano

ESPN New York Giants reporter

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