Stephen Hill's reduced role

November, 28, 2013
11/28/13
12:00
PM ET
FLORHAM PARK, N.J. -- Stephen Hill has more storylines than the first three books of Game of Thrones. First, the Jets' second-year receiver was getting reduced reps. Then, he wasn't. Then, he might have an injury. But on Wednesday, Hill said it was only a few nicks.

Hill
Hill may have been in the first play from scrimmage Sunday against the Ravens, but he played in only 46 percent of the snaps after averaging 77 percent in the first 10 games. Santonio Holmes, Greg Salas and David Nelson all saw more action than Hill.

So has his role been reduced?

"No, no we actually discussed that with coaches so we know what's going on," Hill said.

Hmmm ... Ryan said on Wednesday that Hill was seeing fewer reps during the week as a way to somehow benefit Hill, even though he has seen reps reduced during games as well.

"I think taking some reps off of him during the week I think will help him get back," Ryan said. "So, that's kind of what we're looking to do -- get him to where he can be that receiver we think he can be with that kind of speed. So I think trying not to run his legs into the ground is something that we're trying to get him to where he's fresher for the game."

With 23 catches for 340 yards so far, Hill has not played well. Technically, Ryan drafted him even though he had to be convinced by others in the Jets organization to go for the Georgia Tech player in the second round.

Coaches are traditionally unwilling to give up on their own picks, because then they are charged with a low-performing selection.

Whatever slight of hand the Jets are trying to orchestrate, what is clear is that Hill's practice reps and playing time have been reduced, but that no one wants to talk about it.
Jane McManus has covered New York sports since 1998 and began covering football just before Brett Favre's stint with the Jets. Her work has appeared in Newsday, USA Today, The Journal News and The New York Times. Follow Jane on Twitter.

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