Super Bowl XLVIII: Jets connections

January, 20, 2014
Jan 20
11:00
AM ET
The Seattle Seahawks and Denver Broncos include a few names familiar to New York Jets fans:

Seahawks:

Pete Carroll, head coach: He was the Jets' defensive coordinator from 1990 to 1993, moving up to head coach when Bruce Coslet was fired. In 1994, Carroll went 6-10 in his only season and was unexpectedly fired by the late Leon Hess, who decided that Rich Kotite was the answer. "I'm 80 years old and I want results now," Hess said upon hiring Kotite. The team lost 28 of 32 games under Koitite, not the results Hess had in mind.

Dan Quinn, defensive coordinator: He was the Jets' defensive-line coach in 2007 and 2008, hired by Eric Mangini. The Super Bowl will be a homecoming for Quinn, who grew up in Morristown, N.J., a few minutes from the Jets' facility.

Kippy Brown, wide receivers coach: Brown coached the Jets' running backs from 1990 to 1992. He was around for the end of the Freeman McNeil era and the beginning of Blair Thomas, who didn't have much of an era.

Broncos:

Marquice Cole, cornerback: He was a core special-teams player for the Jets from 2009 to 2011, also appearing in certain sub defenses. He played in the 2010 AFC Championship Game against the Pittsburgh Steelers. He left to sign with the New England Patriots and didn't become a member of the Broncos until last week.

Joel Dreessen, tight end: He was a sixth-round pick of the Jets in 2005, one of only two players from that draft still active in the league. The other is Cincinnati Bengals kicker Mike Nugent. Dreessen has done well for himself (158 career receptions), but he's only a bit player for the Broncos.

Sam Garnes, assistant secondary coach: The Bronx native, who began his career with the New York Giants, started at safety for the Jets in 2002 and 2003. He was a member of the team that beat Peyton Manning and the Indianapolis Colts in the '02 wild-card round, 41-0.

Rich Cimini

ESPN New York Jets reporter

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