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Jeff Cumberland, Jeremy Kerley could be next on Jets' chopping block

Antonio Cromartie was the first. He probably won't be the last.

The New York Jets, attempting to get their salary-cap house in order before the start of free agency, will continue to cut payroll by releasing players and/or re-working contracts. They saved $8 million with Cromartie's release, giving them approximately $21 million in cap room (based on a projected $155 million cap). Putting on my capologist hat, I suspect they'll need at least $35 million to tag Muhammad Wilkerson, re-sign Ryan Fitzpatrick and Damon Harrison and have enough flexibility to add a couple of moderately-priced free agents.

A quick look at who might be next on the chopping block:

Jeff Cumberland, tight end: He couldn't secure a niche in Chan Gailey's offense, resulting in diminished playing time. He'd be an easy cut because he had no signing bonus on the three-year, $5.7 million contract he signed in 2014, meaning no pro-ration.

Cap number: $1.9 million

Cap savings: $1.9 million

Dead money: $0

Jeremy Kerley, wide receiver/punt returner: He's a proven slot receiver, but he had no role on offense. He has no guaranteed money remaining from the four-year, $14 million extension he signed in 2014. They could ask him to take a pay cut, but he'd do better on the open market. The Jets could increase the savings to $2.5 million by designating him a June 1 cut.

Cap number: $3.1 million

Cap savings: $1.3 million

Dead money: $1.8 million

Breno Giacomini, right tackle: He had a mediocre year, so some people are speculating he could be a cap casualty. Thing is, there's no proven replacement on the roster. The Jets like Brent Qvale, but enough to make him a starter?

Cap number: $5.625 million

Cap savings: $4.375 million

Dead money: $1.25 million

Nick Folk, kicker: There are no certainties when you're a 31-year-old kicker coming off an injury to your money leg. Throw in a relatively high cap number, and you end up on a list like this.

Cap number: $3.34 million

Cap savings: $2.2 million

Dead money: $1.2 million