Quillin back to work after Wright win

June, 6, 2012
6/06/12
2:08
PM ET
Please don't take this as a gratuitous plug. But you might want to know that a guy who quite easily could become a middleweight champion of the world by the end of the year, or maybe in 2013, Peter "Kid Chocolate" Quillin, is giving boxing lessons at the Trinity Boxing gym downtown, starting today.

I caught up with Quillin (27-0 with 20 KOs) on the phone, four days after he notched his best win to date, against Winky Wright, in California. The 28-year-old Michigan native, who moved to NYC at age 18 and experienced some of that what Levon Helm, in his smooth and intoxicating drawl, referred to in "The Last Waltz," (“Yeah, New York, it was an adult portion. It was an adult dose. So it took a couple of trips to get into it. You just go in the first time and you get your ass kicked and you take off. As soon as it heals up, you come back and you try it again. Eventually, you fall right in love with it.”) flew to NYC from L.A. on Tuesday night.

He kicked right into gear training people at Trinity, and not because he needs pocket change. "I'm a full-time fighter, all the time," he explained. He wants to make sure he doesn't get off track, keeps thinking about the ring 24/7. Quillin said he'll stay in touch with trainer Eric Brown in L.A., make sure he stays in top shape, because he wants to be ready at a moment's notice. Quillin, who fought smart against Wright, and knocked the defensive ace down in the fifth round, said that he isn't assuming his next date will come in October, at the boxing opening of the Brooklyn Barclays Center.

"I'm not ruling out any other venue," he said. He was watching tape of the Wright win right before we talked, and he said he passed the test "with flying colors" when I asked for a grade.

Wright would I think agree with the grade; the day after the UD10 loss, he announced his retirement from the ring. At 40, he knows it's time for younger guns to make their mark.
Michael Woods, a member of the board of the Boxing Writers Association of America, has been covering boxing since 1991. He writes about boxing for ESPN The Magazine and is the news editor for TheSweetScience.com.

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